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Trying to check input against a regular expression.

The field should only allow alphanumeric characters, dashes and underscores and should NOT allow spaces.

However, the code below allows spaces.

What am I missing?

var regexp = /^[a-zA-Z0-9\-\_]$/;
var check = "checkme";
if (check.search(regexp) == -1)
    { alert('invalid'); }
else
    { alert('valid'); }

Thanks in advance.

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2  
I like Andy E's answer below. Also, you might want to checkout gskinner.com/RegExr for quick regex editing. It's... pretty sweet. –  pixelbobby May 4 '11 at 17:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 38 down vote accepted

However, the code below allows spaces.

No, it doesn't. However, it will only match on input with a length of 1. For inputs with a length greater than or equal to 1, you need a + following the character class:

var regexp = /^[a-zA-Z0-9-_]+$/;
var check = "checkme";
if (check.search(regexp) == -1)
    { alert('invalid'); }
else
    { alert('valid'); }

Note that neither the - (in this instance) nor the _ need escaping.

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Ah, that did it. Thanks. –  Tom May 4 '11 at 18:17

Don't escape the underscore. Might be causing some whackness.

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1  
Why do you say that? I know the underscore doesn't need to be escaped, but I've never heard of \_ causing problems, in JavaScript or any other regex flavor. –  Alan Moore May 4 '11 at 18:22
    
Pure speculation. The expression looked fine otherwise and should not be matching spaces in any case, but I just threw it out there. Probably shoulda been a comment not an answer. –  David Fells May 4 '11 at 18:32

You should use String.match() instead of String.search() if you're only interested in a boolean value. You also need to repeat your character class as explained in the answer by Andy E:

var regexp = /^[a-zA-Z0-9-_]+$/;
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2  
Actually, you should use the RegExp.prototype.test method if you're only interested in a boolean. –  Andy E May 4 '11 at 19:19

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