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I'm currently trying to port a code from parsing a file using a C-style FILE* to a C++-style istringstream. My program runs in parallel and I would like to 1) read in the file only on the first CPU, 2) broadcast the contents in string-form to all other CPUs and 3) have each CPU parse the string.

The old version of the parser essentially does the following:

while (!done) {
    int c = fgetc(infile);
    if (EOF == c) {
        if (ferror(infile)) {
            // throw some error
        }
        return;
    }
    // continue parsing
}

infile is a FILE*. My attempt to convert the code is now the following:

while (!done) {
    char cchar = iss.get(); int c = int(cchar);
    if (EOF == c) {
        if ((iss.rdstate() & ifstream::failbit ) != 0 ) {
            // throw some error
        }
        return;
    }
    // continue parsing
}

iss is an istringstream. The problem is that currently an error is always thrown in the C++ version when EOF is reached. So I don't have the correct analogogn to ferror. Can anyone help me with that?

Sebastian

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char cchar = iss.get(); int c = int(cchar); may never set c to EOF, depending on the signedness of char. –  larsmans May 4 '11 at 18:18
    
In my example EOF was reached - but maybe it's not bulletproof. Does that mean I can replace if (EOF==c) with if (iss.eof()) and skip the second test altogether to achieve the same as in the C-version? –  steigers May 4 '11 at 18:37

2 Answers 2

The failbit will always be set when you try to read something but have reached the end of the file. It will also be set if you try to read something, and haven't reached the end of the file, but the data in the file couldn't be converted to the target type (e.g., you try to read an int, but the file contains "K").

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If the stream has failed, and you might be expecting an EOF, simply test for it:

// read stuff here
if ( iss.eof() ) {
    // failed, but eof is ok
}
else {
    // a real error
}

the eof bit is only set by end of file, not by other problems.

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