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I have a struct that I'd like to export to a file, and then mmap() that file. One issue is that the struct has a member variable that is a string, and I'm not sure how mmap would handle that. In this case all of these strings are of identical size, 8 characters. I'm working on Windows, although I'm using an mmap() function I found online which is supposed to replicate the Linux mmap() function.

The struct itself is defined as:

struct testStruct
{
    string testString;
    unsigned int testInt;
    unsigned int tsetArr[9];
};

Is it possible to define the return value of sizeof() for an object?

Would mmapping a file which contains struct data be possible?

What code would I have to use to export the struct to a file, and then mmap it?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The representation of std::string is not guaranteed by the C++ standard, so this won't work. std::string may (and commonly will) allocate its contents anywhere on the heap, so you'll be storing a pointer and a size member, rather than the string itself.

A char array with compile-time constant size, such as tsetArr, should work, though.

Is it possible to define the return value of sizeof() for an object?

No. sizeof is not a function, so you can't overload it (and strictly, it has a value, but not a return value since it doesn't return from anywhere; it's expanded to a constant by the compiler).

Would mmapping a file which contains struct data be possible?

Possible, yes, but I advise against it; your code will not be portable, perhaps not even to different compilers on the same platform, and your struct is cast in stone. If you want to do so anyway, only mmap POD (plain old data) with no pointer members and put an unsigned version member in your struct that you increment every time its definition is changed.

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Thanks. Would it be possible to memory map a vector of strings then, assuming all strings have the same number of characters (8)? –  Tristan May 4 '11 at 20:18
    
@Tristan: std::vector has the same problem as std::string: it allocates its contents on the heap (and may change the location if necessary for growth). A 2-d array (char[N][8] for some compile-time constant N) should work. –  larsmans May 4 '11 at 21:05
    
Thanks again. After I read the mmap the file of 8 character strings to the 2-d array, what would be the fastest way to then access each of those N items as a string? I will be dealing with hundreds of thousands of items so speed is important. –  Tristan May 4 '11 at 21:28
    
You mean as an std::string? Don't; you'd have to do hundreds of thousands of constructions, each involving a memory allocation. Use them as char* instead. –  larsmans May 4 '11 at 21:32
    
I'm a bit confused. Can you give an example of the declaration of this array that would be mapped? And how do you mmap to a 2-d array? –  Tristan May 4 '11 at 21:45
struct testStruct
{
    char testString[9];
    unsigned int testInt;
    unsigned int tsetArr[9];
};
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