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I'm doing these comparisons to see what options are enabled but the PHP is returning wrong values. I'm exactly checking what banks were enabled by the user.

Próprio = 1
Itaú = 2
Bradesco = 4
Santander = 8
Caixa Econômica Federal = 16
HSBC = 32

When I load the data from MySQL, I've get 16, so only Caixa is turned on, but PHP says that Próprio and HSBC it turned on too. I've made other tests and I received the following results:

1 & 1 = true
1 & 2 = false
1 & 4 = false
1 & 8 = false
1 & 16 = true
1 & 32 = true

2 & 1 = false
2 & 2 = true
2 & 4 = false
2 & 8 = false
2 & 16 = false
2 & 32 = true

4 & 1 = false
4 & 2 = false
4 & 4 = true
4 & 8 = false
4 & 16 = false
4 & 32 = false

8 & 1 = false
8 & 2 = false
8 & 4 = false
8 & 8 = true
8 & 16 = false
8 & 32 = false

16 & 1 = true
16 & 2 = false
16 & 4 = false
16 & 8 = false
16 & 16 = true
16 & 32 = true

32 & 1 = true
32 & 2 = true
32 & 4 = false
32 & 8 = false
32 & 16 = true
32 & 32 = true

Thanks in advance for any help.

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2  
You must be doing something else wrong: codepad.org/Lr9TTAJe In which format do you save the data in the DB? –  Felix Kling May 4 '11 at 18:53
3  
Please show us the actual code you are using. –  Gumbo May 4 '11 at 18:54
1  
Cant reproduce: var_dump(1 & 32); int(0). Whats the exact code you use? –  KingCrunch May 4 '11 at 18:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try casting both values to int before the bitwise operator. It seems that "1" & "16" = 1 while "1" & "2" = 0.

EDIT: The reason for this is that "If both the left-hand and right-hand parameters are strings, the bitwise operator will operate on the characters' ASCII values" as described in the manual.

EDIT 2: A quick test running bitwise operations against values cast to strings seems to yield results consistent with yours:

"1" & "1" == true
"1" & "2" == false
"1" & "4" == false
"1" & "8" == false
"1" & "16" == true
"1" & "32" == true

"2" & "1" == false
"2" & "2" == true
"2" & "4" == false
"2" & "8" == false
"2" & "16" == false
"2" & "32" == true

"4" & "1" == false
"4" & "2" == false
"4" & "4" == true
"4" & "8" == false
"4" & "16" == false
"4" & "32" == false
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Yeah, thanks! I had to cast both to integer. Thank you. –  Danniel Magno May 4 '11 at 20:54

As others have already commented, what you present in your question is hard to reproduce and the results are to be questioned because following the rules/definition of bitwise comparison in PHP (PHP bitwise comparison operators) there must/should be other results.

Keep in mind that there is a operator precedence. Put the bitwise operation into parenthesis to get your desired result:

(32 & 1)

As you did not shown any code I'm not totally sure if that is your problem.

Edit

As Kaivosukeltaja pointed out: The bitwise operator works on integers. You might want to cast you variables / values to integers first to be on the safe side:

( (int) 32 & (int) 1 )

This example is superfluos just to make visible what I'm writing about.

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PHP acts strangely over what is true and false.

Try using 2 & 2 === 2 (=== not ==) and see if that works better.

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3  
Where is it acting strange? Every number different from zero will be true and 0 will be false. –  Felix Kling May 4 '11 at 18:57
1  
With bit operators the loose comparison acts exactly, like its usually expected: if ($bitmask & pow(2,$i)) { echo "$i-th Bit set"; } –  KingCrunch May 4 '11 at 18:59

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