Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I came across a piece of code today that looks like this:

class ClassName(object):
     def __init__(self):
         self._vocabulary = None

     def vocabulary(self):
         self._vocabulary = self._vocabulary or self.keys()
         return self._vocabulary

What exactly is the line self._vocabulary = self._vocabulary or self.keys() doing?

share|improve this question
1  
The first part of your code snippet is invalid Python syntax. –  Sven Marnach May 4 '11 at 19:25
    
Thanks! fixed now –  dave May 4 '11 at 19:27
1  
not quite; I've corrected the class declaration for you. –  Martijn Pieters May 4 '11 at 19:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A line like this:

self._vocabulary = self._vocabulary or self.keys()

Is what's called lazy initialization, when you are retrieving the value for the first time it initializes. So if it has never been initialized self._vocabulary will be None (because the __init__ method had set this value) resulting in the evaluation of the second element of the or so self.keys() will be executed, assigning the returning value to self._vocabulary, thus initializing it for future requests.

When a second time vocabulary is called self._vocabulary won't be None and it will keep that value.

share|improve this answer
    
Upvoted, but it would be good to clarify that it is the explicit line in __init__ that sets self._vocabulary to None, it doesn't happen automatically. –  ncoghlan May 5 '11 at 6:26
    
@ncoghlan Thanks for the vote and for the advice. I edited the post, is it clear now? –  SanSS May 5 '11 at 10:56

In a nutshell, if self._vocabulary evaluates to a logical false (e.g. if it's None, 0, False, etc), then it will be replaced with self.keys().

The or operator in this case, returns whichever value evaluates to a logical true.

Also, your code should look more like this:

class Example(object):
     def __init__(self):
         self._vocabulary = None

     def vocabulary(self):
         self._vocabulary = self._vocabulary or self.keys()
         return self._vocabulary

     def keys(self):
         return ['a', 'b']

ex = Example()
print ex.vocabulary()
ex._vocabulary = 'Hi there'
print ex.vocabulary()
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, makes sense. Is this something that is unique to python? –  dave May 4 '11 at 19:28
    
The or operator in this case, returns whichever value evaluates to a logical true. - This is a little misleading. If self._vocabulary evaluates to False then self.keys() is executed and used for the assignment, whether or not it evaluates as True or False. See stackoverflow.com/questions/1452489/… for explanation of how things evaluate in boolean expressions. –  MattH May 4 '11 at 19:37
    
@dave - No, lots of other languages have similar operators. For example, the || operator does the same thing in ruby. The equivalent would be vocabulary ||= keys() or vocabulary = (vocabulary || keys()) in ruby. It's common of plenty of other languages besides ruby and python, as well. –  Joe Kington May 4 '11 at 19:39
    
@MattH - I used slightly poor phrasing, but that's exactly what I was saying. I.e. logical testing, not identity testing whether it is False. (Thus the lowercase "logical false" and not the object False) Edit: whoops, I misread your comment. Good point... –  Joe Kington May 4 '11 at 19:41

Hard to say, the code will not run for a number of reasons. To guess though, I'd say it looks like it would be evaluated as a logical expression, self._vocabulary would be evaluated False by python as type None, and self.keys() is a method that would (hopefully) return something to be evaluated as well. Then it's just a logical OR between the two and the result gets put into self._vocabulary.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.