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I have a multi dimensional String array process[100][2] like following :

Y B

C D

A B

B C

F E

E Y

F D

Y X

E G

I want to sort it on the first column letter so that the final result will look so :

A B

B C

C D

E Y

E G

F E

F D

Y B

Y X I've tried using the below code but that does not do the trick :

Arrays.sort(process, new Comparator<String[]>() {
        @Override

        public int compare(final String[] entry1, final String[] entry2) {
                final String time1 = entry1[0];
                final String time2 = entry2[0];
                return time1.compareTo(time2);

        }
});

The output I get is :

A B

B C

C D

E Y

F E

Y B

E G

F D

Y X

share|improve this question
4  
In what way does it "not do the trick"? Is the array not sorted at all? – Ted Hopp May 4 '11 at 20:20
    
Can you show us definition of process array and how you check the results after calling Arrays.sort() method in your code? – Yasin Bahtiyar May 4 '11 at 20:36
    
See Peter's answer below. There's nothing wrong with your comparator. – Brian Roach May 4 '11 at 20:51
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The following unit test demonstrates a working Comparator implementation. The test prints out the result as well.

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Comparator;

import junit.framework.TestCase;

public class ArrayTest extends TestCase {

    public class Sorter implements Comparator {
        public int compare(Object o1, Object o2){
            String[] arrayOne = (String[])o1;
            String[] arrayTwo = (String[])o2;
            return arrayOne[0].compareTo(arrayTwo[0]);
        }
    }

    public void testSort() {
        String[][] testData = {
                {"Y", "B"},
                {"C", "D"},
                {"A", "B"},
                {"B", "C"},
                {"F", "E"},
                {"E", "Y"},
        };

        Arrays.sort(testData, new Sorter());

        String[][] expectedOutput = {
                {"A", "B"},
                {"B", "C"},
                {"C", "D"},
                {"E", "Y"},
                {"F", "E"},
                {"Y", "B"},
        };

        for(int i = 0; i < testData.length; ++i) {            
            System.out.println(testData[i][0] + " " + testData[i][1]);
            assertEquals(expectedOutput[i][0], testData[i][0]);
            assertEquals(expectedOutput[i][1], testData[i][1]);            
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The only real difference between your Comparator and his is that you're using the old, non-generic type and casting... which you shouldn't do in new code. There is in fact, nothing wrong with his comparator, it works fine. – Brian Roach May 4 '11 at 20:47
    
Bear in mind this is intended to be a simple test case to demonstrate how to solve the questioners problem. That said, I'd still argue that there's nothing wrong with using 'vanilla' Java code as I've done. – Olly May 4 '11 at 21:59
    
It's not "vanilla" Java, it's "legacy" Java. Raw types should not be used in new code, plain and simple. As the warnings clearly tell you. – Mark Peters May 5 '11 at 13:16
    
@Mark I take your fair point. – Olly May 6 '11 at 9:10

This code (identical comparator) works as expected:

    String[][] arr = {{"B","L"},{"C","M"},{"Z","N"}};

    Arrays.sort(arr, new Comparator<String[]>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(final String[] entry1, final String[] entry2) {
            final String time1 = entry1[0];
            final String time2 = entry2[0];
            return time1.compareTo(time2);
        }
    });

Your problem must be somewhere else.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 ... though I almost think it should be a comment. – Brian Roach May 4 '11 at 20:49
    
You're probably right. Anyhow, thanks for +1. – Peter Knego May 4 '11 at 20:52

You would probably be best off putting both of the characters in the same element for each row. Then, when you needed the separate characters, use

String firstCharacter = myString.charAt(0);
String secondCharacter = myString.charAt(1);

and you can sort your one-dimensional array however you like.

share|improve this answer

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