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I need to validate a Vat number.

xxxx.xxx.xxx --> 0123.456.789 is a valid number.

I found a regex

^(BE)[0-1]{1}[0-9]{9}$|^((BE)|(BE ))[0-1]{1}(\d{3})([.]{1})(\d{3})([.]{1})(\d{3})

This validate the following entry: BE 0123.456.789.

But what i need is to validate only xxxx.xxx.xxx ( nothing else is valid , only this )

So 4 digits , a point , 3 digits , a point , 3 digits.

Also it needs to begin with 0 or 1 ( first x --> 0 or 1 )

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

This should work:

^[01]\d{3}\.\d{3}\.\d{3}$
share|improve this answer
    
Somebody care to say why they downvoted my answer? – manojlds May 4 '11 at 20:40
    
Every answer here have been down voted at least once. I think someone was just on the warpath. – Abe Miessler May 4 '11 at 21:11
    
I downvoted your answer because you just give the regex w/o explaining it. Compare with Oded's answer, which I in turn upvoted. I don't give rep for being the first, only for being the best. – Marc Mutz - mmutz May 5 '11 at 6:04
    
@mmutz - you don't downvote for that. Add comment asking for explanation. If you downvote for a valid answer just because it is not detailed, then what is the difference between upvote and downvote? Just don't upvote my answer if you thought it needed more detail! – manojlds May 5 '11 at 6:14
    
the tooltip over the downvote button says "This answer is not useful", not "This answer is not valid". And your answer was correct, but I felt it wasn't useful. Others think differently, including OP. That's fine. That said, I should have left a comment, yes. I apologize. – Marc Mutz - mmutz May 5 '11 at 6:21

Here you go:

^[01]\d{3}\.\d{3}\.\d{3}$

Breakdown:

^      - Start of string
[01]   - Followed by a 0 or 1
\d{3}  - Followed by three numerals
\.     - Followed by a .
\d{3}  - Followed by three numerals
\.     - Followed by a .
\d{3}  - Followed by three numerals
$      - Followed by end of string
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Doesn't check that the first character is 0 or 1 – aNoble May 4 '11 at 20:23
3  
this question is a blood bath – Abe Miessler May 4 '11 at 20:24
2  
@Abe haha totally agree – BrunoLM May 4 '11 at 20:27

This is the expression

^[0-1]\d{3}[.]\d{3}[.]\d{3}$

^     // start of the input
\d{#} // numbers repeated # times
[.]   // literal . (same as  \.  )
$     // end of the input
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You're missing your second set of 3 numbers. And will that literal for a . work? I had always seen it done as \. but perhaps the grouping brackets makes it a literal character on its own? – Charlie Kilian May 4 '11 at 20:20
    
@Charlie no, I'm not missing. And yes [.] is equivalent to \. – BrunoLM May 4 '11 at 20:22
1  
Ahh, I see it now. Perhaps I read it wrong; I see it now regardless. You might want to edit your explanation notes to include the group twice -- I suspect that is the source of your downvotes. And cool tip for the [.], I didn't know that one. +1 for teaching me something new! – Charlie Kilian May 4 '11 at 20:24

If the patter you need to match really is: 4 digits , a point , 3 digits , a point , 3 digits. and begin with 0 or 1

then try this:

^[01]\d{3}\.\d{3}\.\d{3}$
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you missed the ^ and $ – Galilyou May 4 '11 at 20:20

You want:

^[01]\d{3}\.\d{3}\.\d{3}$
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Looks like @manojlds beat you by five seconds – aNoble May 4 '11 at 20:24

As others have pointed out, one way is

^[01]\d{3}\.\d{3}\.\d{3}$

This is the correct regex if you want to allow any digits (incl. non-Arabic ones), as \d is the same as [:digit:], which matches any character marked as a digit in Unicode.

If you only want to allow Arabic digits (and it sounds like you do), you should use [0-9] instead of \d:

^[01][0-9]{3}\.[0-9]{3}\.[0-9]{3}$
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If that is exactly what you want to validate, you only need this:

^[01]\d{3}\.\d{3}\.\d{3}$

This does exactly what you said in the question: 0 or 1, 3 digits, point, 3 digits, point, 3 digits. Be aware that your regex in your question is more different from what you want than just the BE, however, if you found it in reference to VAT numbers then it also might be more correct or accept more common forms of VAT numbers.

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2  
the 2nd . isn't escaped – Marc Mutz - mmutz May 4 '11 at 20:24
    
@mmutz - Thanks (fixed). But you have edit privileges - I wouldn't be offended if you used them (clearly a typo). – NickC May 4 '11 at 20:33
    
you're right, of course. I apologize. – Marc Mutz - mmutz May 4 '11 at 20:37

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