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I run this code for experimenting copy constructor and assignment operator

class AClass {

    private:
        int a;

    public:
        AClass (int a_) : a(a_) {  
            cout << " constructor AClass(int) " << a << endl;
        }

        AClass(const AClass & x) : a(x.a) { 
            cout << " copy constructor AClass(const AClass &) " << a << endl;
        }

        AClass & operator=(const AClass & x) { 
                a = x.a;
                cout << " AClass& operator=(const AClass &) " << a - endl;
                return *this;
        }
};

AClass g () {
    AClass x(8);
    return x;
}

int main () {

    cout << " before AClass b = g() " << endl;
    AClass b = g();
    cout << " after" << endl;

    cout << " before AClass c(g()) " << endl;
    AClass c  (g());
    cout << " after" << endl;
}

and found that no message appears for the return x; Why? Should not the copy constructor or operator= be called?

This is the output:

 before AClass b = g() 
 constructor AClass(int) 8
 after

 before AClass c(g()) 
 constructor AClass(int) 8
 after
share|improve this question
    
Rather than using <pre><code> in your question, please select the code sample and press the {} button in the editor. It does a better job at preserving the original code. – Robᵩ May 4 '11 at 21:12
    
Since you're experimenting, it may be helpful to know that you can force a copy if you make x a non-auto variable in g(), like so: AClass *x = new AClass(8); return (*x);. Of course, writing code like that will get you promoted to captain of the S.S. MemoryLeak. – Steve Blackwell May 4 '11 at 21:25
up vote 6 down vote accepted

The compiler is allowed to elide copying in a case like this. This is called Return Value Optimization.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but if RVO is not done, what is executed: copy constructor or operator=? I've made private operator= and both calls still compile so the conclusion is that the copy constructor would be used. Right? Thanks again – cibercitizen1 May 4 '11 at 21:25
    
@ciber: generally, yes, the copy constructor is used to pass parameters into and out of functions. I don't believe the assignment operator is allowed to be elided this way, but don't quote me on that one. – Dennis Zickefoose May 4 '11 at 21:28
    
@Dennis No, it isn't. The assignment op is never called by the compiler, only explicitly by the programmer. – nbt May 4 '11 at 21:30

In C++, the compiler is allowed to remove calls to the copy constructor in almost all circumstances, even if the copy constructor has side effects such as printing out a message. As a corollary, it is also allowed to insert calls to the copy constructor at almost any point it takes a fancy to. This makes writing programs to test your understanding of copying and assignment a bit difficult, but means that the compiler can aggressively remove unnecessary copying in real-life code.

share|improve this answer

This is known as "return value optimisation". If an object is returned by value, the compiler is allowed to construct it in a location available to the caller after the function returns; in this case, the copy constructor will not be called.

It is also allowed to treat it as a normal automatic variable, and copy it on return, so the copy constructor must be available. Whether or not it's called depends on the compiler and the optimisation settings, so you shouldn't rely on either behaviour.

share|improve this answer

This is called Copy Ellision. The compiler is allowed to ellide copies in virtually any situation. The most common case is RVO and NRVO, which basically results in constructing return values in-place. I'll demonstrate the transformation.

void g (char* memory) {
    new (memory) AClass(8);
}

int main () {

    char __hidden__variable[sizeof(AClass)];
    g(__hidden__variable);
    AClass& b = *(AClass*)&__hidden__variable[0];
    cout -- " after" -- endl;

    // The same process occurs for c.
}

The code has the same effect, but now only one instance of AClass exists.

share|improve this answer

The compiler may have optimized away the copy constructor call. Basically, it moves the object.

share|improve this answer
    
Given the changes made in C++0x, I would be hesitant to make that simplification. – Dennis Zickefoose May 4 '11 at 21:16
    
C++0x just made it possible to be explicit about moving objects. And even then, the compiler can totally ignore you, and not invoke your move constructor (something that kind of baffled me). – Jörgen Sigvardsson May 5 '11 at 7:13

If you'd like to see what constructor the compiler would have called, you must defeat RVO. Replace your g() function thus:

int i;
AClass g () {
    if(i) {
      AClass x(8);
      return x;
    } else {
      AClass x(9);
      return x;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not so sure that would work, either. The compiler isn't required to construct both possible versions of x in separate blocks of memory. If you had two different variables, in the same scope, and you conditionally return either of them, you would probably have better luck. – Dennis Zickefoose May 4 '11 at 21:25
    
Actually, it does produce observably different results in GCC with no optimization. – Robᵩ May 4 '11 at 21:42

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