Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the best way to properly deal with a default implementation of a interface when the interface doesn't inherit from IDisposable? For example, suppose I want to do

public class FooGetter : IDisposable {

    private IFooProvider fooProvider = MyContainer.GetDefault<IFooProvider>();
    ...
    public void Dispose(){
         ...
         if (fooProvider != null) fooProvider.Dispose(); // obviously has compile error here
    }
}

And it just so happens that the default implementation of IFooProvider is IDisposable, but IFooProvider interface does not inherit from IDisposable. How/where am I supposed to dispose of it?

The question isn't just for dependency injection containers; it would also apply to a tightly-coupled dependency:

private IFooProvider fooProvider = new PatrickProvider();

In this case, I could keep another reference so that I can later Dispose() it, but that seems really janky:

private PatrickProvider defaultFooProvider = new PatrickProvider();
private IFooProvider fooProvider = defaultFooProvider;

Looking for best (or good) practices here.

share|improve this question
    
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/987761/… –  Patrick Szalapski May 4 '11 at 21:54
    
Are you in control of IFooProvider? Of PatrickProvider? Are you looking for best practices in designing them or only in using them as they stand? –  David Ruttka May 5 '11 at 0:00
    
Using them as they stand--suppose that IFooProvider does not implement IDisposable, but PatrickProvider does. –  Patrick Szalapski May 5 '11 at 19:53
1  
That's not true at all. The new-er of the concrete implementation should take care of disposing, since that new-er (e.g. a DI container) knows how to map IFooProvider to a concrete implementation and furthermore has all the code specific to that particular implementation. –  Domenic May 5 '11 at 21:00
1  
Those are my thoughts, yeah :). Sometimes you also need the ability to notify the container that you are done with the object; most DI containers provide this (usually under the name Release). But it's still up to the container to decide whether it's time to dispose or not, e.g. if an object has singleton lifecycle then it will wait for all consumers to release before disposing. –  Domenic May 6 '11 at 0:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Best practices when using a DI container is to let your DI container handle the lifetime of the object for you. This is not possible if you use your DI container as a service locator (boo! anti-pattern!!), like you seem to be doing with MyContainer.GetDefault, but if you properly have your dependencies injected through constructor injection, then it would work well.

For tightly-coupled dependencies, you would have to do something stupid like

using(fooProvider as IDisposable)
{
    // Code that uses fooProvider
}

I think (but am not 100% sure) that using will do nothing if passed null, so this will work whether or not fooProvider implements IDisposable.

There is a good discussion of IDisposable as it relates to dependencies an DI in Mark Seemann's Dependency Injection in .NET chapter 8.

share|improve this answer
1  
You are correct - a using block will do nothing when given a null. –  adrianbanks May 4 '11 at 21:54
1  
I'm marking this as correct, but the discussion throughout these answers was very helpful. –  Patrick Szalapski May 6 '11 at 2:22

You could do a runtime check that the object implements IDisposable and if so, dispose of it:

public class FooGetter : IDisposable
{
    private IFooProvider fooProvider = MyContainer.GetDefault<IFooProvider>();
    ...
    public void Dispose()
    {
         IDisposable disposable = fooProvider as IDisposable;

         if (disposable != null)
         {
             fooProvider.Dispose();
         }
    }
}

You still need to have an inkling that the implementation of your interface may be disposable otherwise the code is a bit pointless, but for your case it will ensure that Dispose() is called on implementations that have it.

Ideally, your interface should derive from IDisposable to state that part of its contract is that you must dispose of it when finished, but I acknowledge that in reality this may not always be possible.

share|improve this answer
    
"Ideally, your interface should derive from IDisposable" -- that's what I want to avoid, since a class need not inherit from IDisposable in order to provide Foo. druttka has my thought in mind. –  Patrick Szalapski May 5 '11 at 20:02
    
@Patrick: As I said, "...I acknowledge that in reality this may not always be possible". –  adrianbanks May 5 '11 at 20:05

To me it seems that there are a few things to consider.

First, it is perfectly reasonable to imagine an interface IFoo where some implementations might have resources to dispose of or cleanup to perform while others might not; therefore, it is some consider it reasonable not to make IFoo inherit IDisposable.

public interface IFoo{
    // ...
}

// Has no cleanup or resources
public interface Foo1:IFoo{
    // ...
}

// Does have resources to release and cleanup to perform
public interface Foo2:IFoo,IDisposable{
    // ...
}

See this answer and this discussion for views of whether the choice to implement IDisposable should be up to concrete classes or up to abstract classes / interfaces. EDIT: Struck most of this paragraph because after reviewing the discussions, I see good points on the "have the interface define it" side and will be reevaluating my opinion. Plus, that decision isn't really relevant to the question being asked.

Now all that aside, if you have IFoo x, and some implementations implement IDisposable while others do not, you can check whether x implements IDisposable. In the case that it does, properly dispose of it. If not, then you should trust that whoever wrote x's implementation of IFooProvider did not implement IDisposable because you need not call it, and be secure in the knowledge that you've done all you can.

IFoo x; 
//x = whatever
if (x is IDisposable)
{
    ((IDisposable)x).Dispose();
} 
share|improve this answer
    
I dislike the latter code. Post #4 of your second linked discussion says it best. If the return type of a factory method or constructor implements IDisposable, that creates a strong inference that the caller needs to ensure that created objects get disposed. Conversely, if the return type of a factory method or constructor doesn't implement IDisposable, that creates a strong inference that it can safely be created and abandoned. –  supercat May 4 '11 at 22:33
    
I agree with that entirely and that's part of why I favor defining it on the abstraction more today than yesterday. In the case where you aren't in control of the existing interface and implementations, though, but happen to know that some but not all implementations also implement IDisposable, some kind of type check would be necessary? –  David Ruttka May 4 '11 at 23:55
    
Also the reason I can agree with it entirely is because it says "strong inference" and not "guarantee" –  David Ruttka May 4 '11 at 23:56
1  
@supercat The purpose of the bell, when operational, is to draw attention to the situation. The danger is relying only upon the bell and disregarding what is in plain sight. Using your example, failing to dispose of something when you should is like getting hit by the train. We agree that a method returning IDisposable is a strong inference that you should (a bell). In some cases (Patrick has one, I believe), a returned interface doesn't inherit IDisposable, but some implemenations of that interface do (the bell has failed). One needs to use one's own judgment to take the appropriate action. –  David Ruttka May 5 '11 at 14:40
1  
@druttka: ...may preclude such optimizations even if the Dispose method would do nothing). It's too bad Microsoft seems to have designed IDisposable as an afterthought, since there are some weaknesses in the design which we are by now unfortunately stuck with (e.g. if Dispose is called during the handling of an exception, and the Dispose itself fails with an exception, the best behavior would probably be for Dispose to wrap both exceptions in a CleanupException, but Dispose wouldn't have the information needed to do that). –  supercat May 5 '11 at 15:27

If you're defining IFooProvider, why not make it inherit IDispoable? If someone comes up with an implementation which doesn't need cleanup, it can simply implement an empty Dispose method.

share|improve this answer
    
Because this violates separation of concerns--IFooProvider is responsible for specifying what a class must be to provide foo. Being disposable is not always required. –  Patrick Szalapski May 5 '11 at 19:54
    
@Patrick Szalapski: The IDisposable interface is in a sense backward, in that the stronger promise applies to classes which don't implement it. The IDisposable interface doesn't imply that a class actually needs cleanup, so much as a lack of an IDisposable interface implies that it does not. IDisposable promises to do everything necessary for cleanup; if that "everything" is nothing, it's met its obligations. If a factory method might return an object which the caller should dispose, the return type should implement IDisposable. –  supercat May 5 '11 at 20:31
1  
@Patrick Szalapski: If an interface is expected to be used as the return type of a factory method which yields an object needing disposal, then it should implement IDisposable. This most common situation this applies is when the factory itself is an interface (e.g. if IFactory is supposed to have a MakeCar function that returns an ICar, and some MakeCar functions will return a IDisposable objects, then ICar should implement IDisposable). –  supercat May 5 '11 at 22:14
1  
@Patrick IDisposable should only be applied to interfaces when you want to communicate that disposal is part of the contract of the interface. This seems exceedingly rare to me, since disposal is (almost?) always an implementation detail. The only case I could think of where it makes sense is when you are trying to do something clever with using as an idiom, e.g. as is done in ASP.NET MVC with using(Html.BeginForm()). –  Domenic May 6 '11 at 0:38
1  
@supercat: still, I don't think ITileRenderer should be disposable! Disposability is an implementation detail, not part of the contract of being a tile renderer. If the user of an ITileRenderer needs to explicitly release an object, it should let the factory know via a much less confusing mechanism, like TileRendererFactory.Release. Then TileRendererFactory can decide whether to not dispose at all, dispose now, dispose when other consumers are done... at this point TileRendererFactory is a DI container of course, so you should probably be using one of those. –  Domenic May 6 '11 at 15:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.