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I'm working on a little text-based adventure in Python 3.2 as I learn it in order to practise and become more familiar with the language. Anyway, I want to make it so that when certain actions happen, the color of the print text changes. How do I do this.

For example, the first text I want this to occur for is:

if 'strength' in uniqueskill.lower():
time.sleep(3)
print('As you are a Warrior, I shall supply you with the most basic tools every Warrior needs.')
time.sleep(3)
print('A sword and shield.')
time.sleep(1)
print('You have gained A SWORD AND SHIELD!')
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marked as duplicate by Ophion, rds, Roman C, h22, David Levesque Sep 15 '13 at 19:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
You most likely need to output ANSI escape sequences, as mentioned in this answer. – samplebias May 4 '11 at 22:14

Colorama is a great fully cross platform module for printing to the terminal/command line in different colours.

Example:

import colorama
from colorama import Fore, Back, Style

colorama.init()

text = "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog"

print(Fore.RED + text)
print(Back.GREEN + text + Style.RESET_ALL)
print(text)

Gives you:

enter image description here

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Keep getting an AssertionError. – Jack May 4 '11 at 23:52
    
Edited to use Python3 print statements. Are you still getting the error? If so please paste the code you're running and full stacktrace somewhere. – Acorn May 5 '11 at 0:16
    
Still got an error, code is as follows: import colorama from colorama import Fore, Back, Style colorama.init() notedaction = "You have gained a SWORD AND SHIELD!" if 'strength' in uniqueskill.lower(): time.sleep(3) print('As you are a Warrior, I shall supply you with the most basic tools every Warrior needs.') time.sleep(3) print('A sword and shield.') time.sleep(1) print(Fore.RED + notedaction) – Jack May 5 '11 at 17:53
    
I see the problem was that you were using IDLE: stackoverflow.com/questions/5902233/… – Acorn May 5 '11 at 22:39

You didn't specify your platform, which is quite important here, since most methods for outputting color text to console are platform specific. The curses library which comes with Python, for instance, is UNIX-only, and ANSI codes, don't work on new versions of Windows anymore. The most cross platform solution I can think of, is to install the Windows version of curses on Windows machines and use it.

Here's an example for using color with curses:

import curses

# initialize curses
stdscr = curses.initscr()
curses.start_color()

# initialize color #1 to Blue with Cyan background
curses.init_pair(1, curses.COLOR_BLUE, curses.COLOR_CYAN)

stdscr.addstr('A sword and a shield.', curses.color_pair(1))
stdscr.refresh()

# finalize curses
curses.endwin()

Please note that curses is more complex than just having colors. You can use it to define several windows on the console screen, position text using absolute or relative coordinates, manipulate keyboard input and so on. You can find a tutorial here: http://docs.python.org/dev/howto/curses.html

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@Boaz Um, no example? – nchpmn May 4 '11 at 22:37
    
I'm on Windows 7 and eventually figured it out. I installed the Colorama library and used the code: print('\x1b[34m' + 'YOU HAVE GAINED A SWORD AND SHIELD!'). The problem is that the final product comes out as '34mYOU HAVE GAINED A SWORD AND SHIELD!' but it is the right color. Any way to hide the letter and numbers? – Jack May 4 '11 at 22:38
    
@Crashdown - example got cut while posting, read edit. – Boaz Yaniv May 4 '11 at 22:40
    
@Boaz sorry mate. – nchpmn May 4 '11 at 22:42
    
I would prefer using curses to plain ANSI codes for two reasons: they're ugly (especially when you mix with your test), and curses is more powerful. Anyway, I don't know how to make them work properly in python on Windows and I wouldn't bother. If I needed a Windows-only implementation I'd use something like WConio or console – Boaz Yaniv May 4 '11 at 22:45

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