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I want to execute java commands interactively from shell: is there a way to do so?

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closed as not a real question by Daniel DiPaolo, Jeremy Heiler, ataylor, phooji, Graviton May 5 '11 at 0:57

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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uhuh? "Write the method itself in cmd"? Do you mean you want an interactive interpreter? –  akappa May 4 '11 at 22:37
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In a way similar to the REPL of Python of Lisp? –  Davidann May 4 '11 at 22:39
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I think this person would like to be able to do something like the following hypothetical example java --cmd 'int x=5; System.out.print(x);' –  ninjagecko May 4 '11 at 22:43
    
@ninjagecko: yeah, but it doesn't make even the slightest sense to do such thing in Java, given its verbosity... –  akappa May 4 '11 at 22:46
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@Isaac Truett: huhu? I love Java, I'd just hate to write a bunch of "class X { public static void main(...) { ... } } in an interactive shell just to evaluate a command. –  akappa May 4 '11 at 23:06

7 Answers 7

The closest thing I'm aware of is BeanShell.

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Not an interactive interpreter or a shell, but consider Eclipse scrapbook pages a possible option.

The Java development toolkit (JDT) contributes a scrapbook facility that can be used to experiment and evaluate Java code snippets before building a complete Java program. Snippets are edited and evaluated in the Scrapbook page editor, with resultant problems reported in the editor.

From a Java scrapbook editor, you can select a code snippet, evaluate it, and display the result as a string. You can also show the object that results from evaluating a code snippet in the debuggers' Expressions View.

Bonus: the scrapbook is an Eclipse default feature, so it's not required to install anything you don't already have.

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I would recommend using DrJava http://drjava.org/. It could serve your purpose

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Handy tool. You do have to stub out a basic console app, though. –  Precipitous May 10 '12 at 16:11
    
The Interactions pane is a little useful, actually what I want is something just like SnippetCompiler for C# and LinqPad for LINQ. The interactions pane is not very handy to write a chunk of code. –  zhaorufei May 18 '13 at 9:13

No, it isn't possible (as far as I have found) to write and run arbitrary java snippets interactively from the command line.

I was looking for something similar a few years ago. There's BeanShell, and JDistro which have some elements of a pure-Java shell. The closest I ever found was jsh which was somebody's university project, as I recall, never met with any popularity, and was abandoned.

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I think this person would like to be able to do something like the following hypothetical example java --cmd 'int x=5; System.out.print(x);'

You can write your own program, let's call it java-snippet, which has a single command-line argument string called code. Insert the code snippet into the of temporary file.

...main(...) {
    //vvv your program inserts code here vvv
    //INSERT_CODE_MARKER
    //^^^                                ^^^
}

Then your java-snippet program compiles the temporary file and immediately runs it.

[edit: it seems the original poster did not in fact want this, but wants an interactive java interpreter -- leaving this answer here for posterity]

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Probably you are looking for this

edit : as Guandalino point - javac is only for files. So you can`t compile and run from string.

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Check out this article. Does something similar I think. http://davidwinterfeldt.blogspot.com/2009/02/genearting-bytecode.html

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