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Is there any method to check if array A contains all the elements of array B?

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Show an example of arrays you want to compare. Do you mean that Array A can contain the same elements with the same number of elements, or just the same elements and different count of them –  fl00r May 4 '11 at 22:55
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Do you care about repetition? For example, let a be [1,2,3,4] and b be [1,1,2]. What should the return value be? –  Serabe May 5 '11 at 7:33
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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should work for what you need:

(a & b) == b
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this won't work as a rule. a = [1,2,2,1,3]; b = [3,2,1]; (a & b) == b => false –  fl00r May 4 '11 at 22:53
    
Yes, but a = [1,2,2,1,3]; b = [3,2,1]; (a & b).sort == b.sort => true –  the Tin Man May 4 '11 at 23:30
    
@the Tin Man, Yes, but a = [1,2,2,1,3]; b = [3,2,2,1]; (a & b).sort == b.sort => false –  fl00r May 17 '11 at 11:24
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no need to sort just reverse the order of the binary AND –  Will Jan 29 '12 at 19:34
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You can try this

a.sort.uniq == b.sort.uniq

or

(a-b).empty?

And if [1,2,2] != [1,2] in your case you can:

a.group_by{|i| i} == b.group_by{|i| i}
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+1 for (a-b).empty? –  Ryan Bigg May 4 '11 at 22:59
    
Just in case someone ends up here: these are all wrong. The correct answer is (b-a).empty?, not the other way around. Others are just plain wrong. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/7387937/… –  oseiskar May 19 at 13:05
    
@oseiskar no, they are not wrong. It depends on the task. –  fl00r May 19 at 15:26
    
I don't think so. If the task is to answer the question does array A contain all elements of array B, which quite literally translates to Ruby as B.map{|e|A.include?(e)}.all?, then none of these give the correct answer in the generic case (or, e.g., the first example I came up with: A = [1,2,3], B = [1,2]). –  oseiskar May 19 at 19:32
    
@oseiskar yes, this sounds reasonable. In generic case they all wrong. –  fl00r May 20 at 10:04
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You could use Ruby's Set class:

>> require 'set' #=> true
>> a = [*1..5] #=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>> b = [*1..3] #=> [1, 2, 3]
>> a.to_set.superset? b.to_set #=> true

For small arrays I usually do the same as what fl00r suggested:

>> (b-a).empty? #=> true
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There's also the Set class (part of the standard library) which would allow you to just check to see if B is a subset of A, e.g.

>> a = [1,2,3,4,5]       => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>> b = [3,4,5]           => [3, 4, 5]
>> require 'set'         => true 
>> set_a = a.to_set      => #<Set: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}> 
>> set_b = b.to_set      => #<Set: {3, 4, 5}> 

>> set_b.subset? set_a   => true

http://www.ruby-doc.org/stdlib/libdoc/set/rdoc/index.html

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I prefer to do this via: (b - a).blank? # tells that b is contained in a

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You may want to check out the Set class in the Ruby Standard library. The proper_subset? method will probably do what you want.

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