Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Suppose I have a table called Companies that has a DepartmentID column. There's also a Departaments table that has as EmployeeID column. Of course I have an Employee table as well. The problem is that I want to delete a company, so first i have to delete all the employees for every departament and then all the departaments in the company. Cascade Delete is not an option, therefore i wish to use nested transactions. I'm new to SQL so I would appreciate your help.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'm not sure why you need nested transactions here. You only need one actual transaction:

BEGIN TRAN

DELETE FROM Employee
    FROM Employee
    INNER JOIN Department ON Employee.DepartmentID = Department.DepartmentID
    INNER JOIN Company ON Department.CompanyID = Company.CompanyID
    WHERE Company.CompanyID = @CompanyID

DELETE FROM Department
    FROM Department
    INNER JOIN Company ON Department.CompanyID = Company.CompanyID
    WHERE Company.CompanyID = @CompanyID

DELETE FROM Company
    WHERE Company.CompanyID = @CompanyID

COMMIT TRAN

Note the double FROM, that is not a typo, it's the correct SQL syntax for performing a JOIN in a DELETE.

Each statement is atomic, either the entire DELETE will succeed or fail, which isn't that important in this case because the entire batch will either succeed or fail.

BTW- I think you had your relationships backwards. The Department would not have an EmployeeID, the Employee would have a DepartmentID.

share|improve this answer
    
Your queries can be optimized to remove the INNER JOINs on Company. Or would this be something SQL Server would do automatically? –  rpetrich Sep 12 '08 at 14:11
    
You're right. I just added them to be explicit, but you could change your WHERE clause to: WHERE Department.CompanyID = @CompanyID –  Brannon Sep 12 '08 at 16:05

I'm not answering your question, but foreign Keys is the way to go, why is it not an option?

As for nested transactions they are:

BEGIN
  delete from Employee where departmentId = 1;
  BEGIN
     delete from Department where companyId = 2;
     BEGIN
        delete from Company where companyId = 2;
     END
  END
END

Programmatically it looks different of course, but that'd depend on the platform you are using

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.