Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For example I have a user input a phone number.

cout << "Enter phone number: ";
INPUT: (555) 555-5555
cin >> phone;

I want to remove the "(", ")", and "-" characters from the string. I've looked at the string remove, find and replace functions however I only see that they operate based on position.

Is there a string function that I can use to pass a character, "(" for example, and have it remove all instances within a string?

Thank you for your time.

share|improve this question

13 Answers 13

up vote 51 down vote accepted
   string str("(555) 555-5555");

   char chars[] = "()-";

   for (unsigned int i = 0; i < strlen(chars); ++i)
   {
      // you need include <algorithm> to use general algorithms like std::remove()
      str.erase (std::remove(str.begin(), str.end(), chars[i]), str.end());
   }

   // output: 555 5555555
   cout << str << endl;
share|improve this answer
    
I found this implementation the easiest for my case. Thank you. –  SD. May 5 '11 at 17:32
2  
sizeof(chars) is 4. You probably don't want to iterate for the NUL character so you might want to use strnlen instead. –  Ken Smith Mar 16 '12 at 20:39
    
@Ken, right. Updated. –  Eric Z Oct 28 '12 at 9:09
    
How does this work? Is it not a double negative to use erase and remove? To me this reads: "erase the characters that are in positions where ()- aren't." And since each one is done at a time, shouldn't it remove ALL characters? I've read the documentation on both functions, and this makes no sense to me. cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/remove cplusplus.com/reference/string/string/erase –  Brent Apr 10 '13 at 0:35
    
@Brent std::remove() will NOT remove any valid characters from the string, it just moves valid characters together. –  lk_vc Apr 11 '13 at 12:04

I want to remove the "(", ")", and "-" characters from the string.

You can use the std::remove_if() algorithm to remove only the characters you specify:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <string>

bool IsParenthesesOrDash(char c)
{
    switch(c)
    {
    case '(':
    case ')':
    case '-':
        return true;
    default:
        return false;
    }
}

int main()
{
    std::string str("(555) 555-5555");
    str.erase(std::remove_if(str.begin(), str.end(), &IsParenthesesOrDash), str.end());
    std::cout << str << std::endl; // Expected output: 555 5555555
}

The std::remove_if() algorithm requires something called a predicate, which can be a function pointer like the snippet above.

You can also pass a function object (an object that overloads the function call () operator). This allows us to create an even more general solution:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <string>

class IsChars
{
public:
    IsChars(const char* charsToRemove) : chars(charsToRemove) {};

    bool operator()(char c)
    {
        for(const char* testChar = chars; *testChar != 0; ++testChar)
        {
            if(*testChar == c) { return true; }
        }
        return false;
    }

private:
    const char* chars;
};

int main()
{
    std::string str("(555) 555-5555");
    str.erase(std::remove_if(str.begin(), str.end(), IsChars("()- ")), str.end());
    std::cout << str << std::endl; // Expected output: 5555555555
}

You can specify what characters to remove with the "()- " string. In the example above I added a space so that spaces are removed as well as parentheses and dashes.

share|improve this answer
    
You could also use ispunct(int c) –  MSalters May 5 '11 at 7:21
    
Excellent implementation. This method worked flawlessly and has a lot of room for further dynamics. Thank you for the response. MSalters, I will also look up the ispunct(int c) function and report back on my workings. –  SD. May 5 '11 at 17:28

I'm afraid there is no such a member for std::string, but you can easily program that kind of functions. It may not be the fastest solution but this would suffice:

std::string RemoveChars(const std::string& source, const std::string& chars) {
   std::string result="";
   for (unsigned int i=0; i<source.length(); i++) {
      bool foundany=false;
      for (unsigned int j=0; j<chars.length() && !foundany; j++) {
         foundany=(source[i]==chars[j]);
      }
      if (!foundany) {
         result+=source[i];
      }
   }
   return result;
}

EDIT: Reading the answer below, I understood it to be more general, not only to detect digit. The above solution will omit every character passed in the second argument string. For example:

std::string result=RemoveChars("(999)99-8765-43.87", "()-");

Will result in

99999876543.87
share|improve this answer

Here is a different solution for anyone interested. It uses the new For range in c++11

string str("(555) 555-5555");
string str2="";

for (const auto c: str){

    if(!ispunct(c)){

        str2.push_back(c);
    }
}

str = str2;
//output: 555 5555555
cout<<str<<endl;
share|improve this answer

Yes, you can use the isdigit() function to check for a digits :)

Here you go:

#include <iostream>
#include <cctype>

using namespace std;

int main(){

  char *str = "(555) 555-5555";
  int len = strlen(str);

  for (int i=0; i<len; i++){
      if (isdigit(*(str+i))){
        cout << *(str+i);
      }
  }

  cout << endl;


return 0;   
}

Hope it helps :)

share|improve this answer
    
This can be modified to remove the element which returns false. Thank you. –  SD. May 5 '11 at 17:35

remove_if() has already been mentioned. But, with C++0x, you can specify the predicate for it with a lambda instead.

Below is an example of that with 3 different ways of doing the filtering. "copy" versions of the functions are included too for cases when you're working with a const or don't want to modify the original.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <cctype>
using namespace std;

string& remove_chars(string& s, const string& chars) {
    s.erase(remove_if(s.begin(), s.end(), [&chars](const char& c) {
        return chars.find(c) != string::npos;
    }), s.end());
    return s;
}
string remove_chars_copy(string s, const string& chars) {
    return remove_chars(s, chars);
}

string& remove_nondigit(string& s) {
    s.erase(remove_if(s.begin(), s.end(), [](const char& c) {
        return !isdigit(c);
    }), s.end());
    return s;
}
string remove_nondigit_copy(string s) {
    return remove_nondigit(s);
}

string& remove_chars_if_not(string& s, const string& allowed) {
    s.erase(remove_if(s.begin(), s.end(), [&allowed](const char& c) {
        return allowed.find(c) == string::npos;
    }), s.end());
    return s;
}
string remove_chars_if_not_copy(string s, const string& allowed) {
    return remove_chars_if_not(s, allowed);
}

int main() {
    const string test1("(555) 555-5555");
    string test2(test1);
    string test3(test1);
    string test4(test1);
    cout << remove_chars_copy(test1, "()- ") << endl;
    cout << remove_chars(test2, "()- ") << endl;
    cout << remove_nondigit_copy(test1) << endl;
    cout << remove_nondigit(test3) << endl;
    cout << remove_chars_if_not_copy(test1, "0123456789") << endl;
    cout << remove_chars_if_not(test4, "0123456789") << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Instead of const char& c, I should have really used const string::value_type&. But, it's not a big deal in this case. –  Shadow2531 May 5 '11 at 9:29
    
This is a very thorough implementation. I appreciate it and will use this implementation as well. –  SD. May 5 '11 at 17:37

If you have access to a compiler that supports variadic templates, you can use this:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>

template<char ... CharacterList>
inline bool check_characters(char c) {
    char match_characters[sizeof...(CharacterList)] = { CharacterList... };
    for(int i = 0; i < sizeof...(CharacterList); ++i) {
        if(c == match_characters[i]) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

template<char ... CharacterList>
inline void strip_characters(std::string & str) {
    str.erase(std::remove_if(str.begin(), str.end(), &check_characters<CharacterList...>), str.end());
}

int main()
{
    std::string str("(555) 555-5555");
    strip_characters< '(',')','-' >(str);
    std::cout << str << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
using namespace std;


// c++03
string s = "(555) 555-5555";
s.erase(remove_if(s.begin(), s.end(), not1(ptr_fun(::isdigit))), s.end());

// c++11
s.erase(remove_if(s.begin(), s.end(), ptr_fun(::ispunct)), s.end());

Note: It's posible you need write ptr_fun<int, int> rather than simple ptr_fun

share|improve this answer

Here's yet another alternative:

template<typename T>
void Remove( std::basic_string<T> & Str, const T * CharsToRemove )
{
    std::basic_string<T>::size_type pos = 0;
    while (( pos = Str.find_first_of( CharsToRemove, pos )) != std::basic_string<T>::npos )
    {
        Str.erase( pos, 1 ); 
    }
}

std::string a ("(555) 555-5555");
Remove( a, "()-");

Works with std::string and std::wstring

share|improve this answer

I'm new, but some of the answers above are insanely complicated, so here's an alternative.

NOTE: As long as 0-9 are contiguous (which they should be according to the standard), this should filter out all other characters but numbers and ' '. Knowing 0-9 should be contiguous and a char is really an int, we can do the below.

EDIT: I didn't notice the poster wanted spaces too, so I altered it...

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstring>

void numfilter(char * buff, const char * string)
{
  do
  { // According to standard, 0-9 should be contiguous in system int value.
    if ( (*string >= '0' && *string <= '9') || *string == ' ')
      *buff++ = *string;
  } while ( *++string );
  *buff++ = '\0'; // Null terminate
}

int main()
{
  const char *string = "(555) 555-5555";
  char buff[ strlen(string) + 1 ];

  numfilter(buff, string);
  printf("%s\n", buff);

return 0;
}

Below is to filter supplied characters.

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstring>

void cfilter(char * buff, const char * string, const char * toks)
{
  const char * tmp;  // So we can keep toks pointer addr.
  do
  {
    tmp = toks;
    *buff++ = *string; // Assume it's correct and place it.
    do                 // I can't think of a faster way.
    {
      if (*string == *tmp)
      {
        buff--;  // Not correct, pull back and move on.
        break;
      }
    }while (*++tmp);
  }while (*++string);

  *buff++ = '\0';  // Null terminate
}

int main()
{
  char * string = "(555) 555-5555";
  char * toks = "()-";
  char buff[ strlen(string) + 1 ];

  cfilter(buff, string, toks);
  printf("%s\n", buff);

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That does not do what the OP wanted; it deletes the spaces, too. –  Andrew Barber Feb 12 '13 at 6:07

Using std::wstring and wchar_t (requires the Unicode header):

//#include <tchar.h>
std::wstring phone(L"(555) 555-5555");

...fancy static range initializer next; not necessary to setup badChars2 this exact same way. It's overkill; more academic than anything else:

const wchar_t *tmp = L"()-"; 
const std::set<wchar_t> badChars2(tmp,tmp + sizeof(tmp)-1);

Simple, concise lambda:

  1. Uses phone in the lambda capture list.
  2. Uses Erase-remove idiom
  3. Removes all bad characters from phone

    for_each(badChars2.begin(), badChars2.end(), [&phone](wchar_t n){
         phone.erase(std::remove(phone.begin(), phone.end(), n), phone.end());
    });
    wcout << phone << endl;
    

Output: "555 5555555"

share|improve this answer

For those of you that prefer a more concise, easier to read lambda coding style...

This example removes all non-alphanumeric and white space characters from a wide string. You can mix it up with any of the other ctype.h helper functions to remove complex-looking character-based tests.

(I'm not sure how these functions would handle CJK languages, so walk softly there.)

    // Boring C loops: 'for(int i=0;i<str.size();i++)' 
    // Boring C++ eqivalent: 'for(iterator iter=c.begin; iter != c.end; ++iter)'

See if you don't find this easier to understand than noisy C/C++ for/iterator loops:

TSTRING label = _T("1.   Replen & Move  RPMV");
TSTRING newLabel = label;
set<TCHAR> badChars; // Use ispunct, isalpha, isdigit, et.al. (lambda version, with capture list parameter(s) example; handiest thing since sliced bread)
for_each(label.begin(), label.end(), [&badChars](TCHAR n){
    if (!isalpha(n) && !isdigit(n))
        badChars.insert(n);
});

for_each(badChars.begin(), badChars.end(), [&newLabel](TCHAR n){
    newLabel.erase(std::remove(newLabel.begin(), newLabel.end(), n), newLabel.end());
});

newLabel results after running this code: "1ReplenMoveRPMV"

This is just academic, since it would clearly be more precise, concise and efficient to combine the 'if' logic from lambda0 (first for_each) into the single lambda1 (second for_each), if you have already established which characters are the "badChars".

share|improve this answer
    
Credit to @Eric Z's answer for mentioning and using the handy Erase-remove idiom. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erase-remove_idiom –  Darrin Jan 9 at 8:00

Boost is_any_of one liner to strip for all character from a given string:

#include <boost/range/algorithm/remove_if.hpp>
#include <boost/algorithm/string/classification.hpp>

std::string str = "a_bc0_d";
str.erase(boost::remove_if(str, boost::is_any_of("_0")), str.end());
assert((str == "abcd"));
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.