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i'm using Jquery. This if-statement works:

if ($(this).siblings(".numOfMatchedKeywords").text() == 1) {
                    $(this).siblings(".numOfMatchedKeywords").css({'color':'#0099ff'})
               }

But when i tried to turn it into a switch case, I can't get it to work:

var numWord = $(this).siblings(".numOfMatchedKeywords").text();
                switch (numWord){
                    case 1: 
                        numWord.css({'color':'#0099ff'})
                    break;
                    case 2: 
                        numWord.css({'color':'#33cc33'})
                    break;
                    case 3: 
                        numWord.css({'color':'#ff0099'})
                    break;
                }

what am I doing wrong?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Compacted version:

var numWord = parseInt($(this).siblings(".numOfMatchedKeywords").text());
var colors = ['', '#0099ff', '#33cc33', '#ff0099'];
$(this).siblings(".numOfMatchedKeywords").css('color', colors[numWord]);
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Wow, nicely done. I don't even understand how this works, but it's 157 characters less than the answer below. Could you explain how this works, to help me and anyone else who stumbles upon it to understand? –  android.nick May 5 '11 at 2:30
    
Glad to see it could help you. Well, I created an array for the colors, and numWord is used as index for selecting the right color. I added an empty first item for the index 0, as your count begin with 1. You can also remove that empty element and use numWord - 1 as index. Tell me if you need more details. –  morgar May 5 '11 at 3:08

use parseInt()

parseInt($(this).siblings(".numOfMatchedKeywords").text(), 10);

Also, numWord is text and not a jQuery object.

var numWord = parseInt($(this).siblings(".numOfMatchedKeywords").text(), 10);
var $sib =$(this).siblings(".numOfMatchedKeywords");
switch (numWord) {
case 1:
    $sib.css({
        'color': '#0099ff'
    })
    break;
case 2:
    $sib.css({
        'color': '#33cc33'
    })
    break;
case 3:
    $sib.css({
        'color': '#ff0099'
    })
    break;
}
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curious, what does the 10 mean at the end of parseInt? –  android.nick May 5 '11 at 2:23
    
parseInt's second parameter is the base you want it to use, and although it is an optional parameter that defaults to base 10 you should always specify it explicitly because otherwise parseInt assumes that text with a leading '0' will be octal and a leading '0x' means hexadecimal. –  nnnnnn May 5 '11 at 2:43

I'm guessing the if statement performs some auto-conversion on .text() and 1 and equates the string and the integer, whereas the switch statement does teh equivalent of ===. Not guaranteeing that above, but i'd recommend trying: 'case "1":instead ofcase 1:`

Also, you're applying your css to numWord which you set equal to the text of the element, not the element itself.

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