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I've bound enums to radio buttons before, and I generally understand how it works. I used the alternate implementation from this question: WPF: How to bind RadioButtons to an enum?

Instead of enumerations, I'd like to generate a runtime-enumerated set of a custom type and present those as a set of radio buttons. I have gotten a view working against a runtime-enumerated set with a ListView, binding to the ItemsSource and SelectedItem properties, so my ViewModel is hooked up correctly. Now I am trying to switch from a ListView to a ItemsControl with radio buttons.

Here's as far as I've gotten:

<Window.Resources>
    <vm:InstanceToBooleanConverter x:Key="InstanceToBooleanConverter" />
</Window.Resources>

<!-- ... -->

<ItemsControl ItemsSource="{Binding ItemSelections}">
    <ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
        <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type vm:ISomeType}">
            <RadioButton Content="{Binding Name}"
                         IsChecked="{Binding Path=SelectedItem, Converter={StaticResource InstanceToBooleanConverter}, ConverterParameter={Binding}}"
                         Grid.Column="0" />
        </DataTemplate>
    </ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
</ItemsControl>

InstanceToBooleanConverter has the same implementation as EnumToBooleanConverter from that other question. This seems right, since it seems like it just invokes the Equals method:

public class InstanceToBooleanConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return value.Equals(parameter);
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return value.Equals(true) ? parameter : Binding.DoNothing;
    }
}

The problem I am getting now is that I can't figure out how to send a runtime value as the ConverterParameter. When I try (with the code above), I get this error:

A 'Binding' cannot be set on the 'ConverterParameter' property of type 'Binding'. A 'Binding' can only be set on a DependencyProperty of a DependencyObject.

Is there a way to bind to the item instance, and pass it to the IValueConverter?

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4 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It turns out that it is much simpler to abandon using ItemsControl and instead go with ListBox.

It may be more heavy-weight, but that's mostly because it is doing the heavy lifting for you. It is really easy to do a two-way binding between RadioButton.IsChecked and ListBoxItem.IsSelected. With the proper control template for the ListBoxItem, you can easily get rid of all the selection visual.

<Window.Resources>
    <!-- Style to get rid of the selection visual -->
    <Style TargetType="{x:Type ListBoxItem}">
        <Setter Property="Template">
            <Setter.Value>
                <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type ListBoxItem}">
                    <ContentPresenter />
                </ControlTemplate>
            </Setter.Value>
        </Setter>
    </Style>
</Window.Resources>
<ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding Properties}" SelectedItem="{Binding SelectedItem}">
    <ListBox.ItemTemplate>
        <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type local:SomeClass}">
            <RadioButton Content="{Binding Name}" GroupName="Properties">
                <!-- Binding IsChecked to IsSelected requires no support code -->
                <RadioButton.IsChecked>
                    <Binding Path="IsSelected"
                             RelativeSource="{RelativeSource AncestorType=ListBoxItem}"
                             Mode="TwoWay" />
                </RadioButton.IsChecked>
            </RadioButton>
        </DataTemplate>
    </ListBox.ItemTemplate>
</ListBox>
share|improve this answer
    
The reason I originally went with ItemsControl is because I thought it would be more bug-prone to try to reuse ListBox, and I only knew the IValueConverter approach to converting radio button items to a selection. It turns out it is much easier (and seems much cleaner) to adapt a ListBox. Please let me know if there are issues or potential bugs with this approach. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham May 6 '11 at 1:08
    
But how do you get rid of the white background that a ListBox normally has? –  Qwertie Apr 29 '13 at 22:46
1  
I've got it! Just add these attributes to the <ListBox>: BorderBrush="Transparent" Background="Transparent" –  Qwertie Apr 30 '13 at 21:49
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As far as I know, there's no good way to do this with a MultiBinding, although you initially think there would be. Since you can't bind the ConverterParameter, your ConvertBack implementation doesn't have the information it needs.

What I have done is created a separate EnumModel class solely for the purpose of binding an enum to radio buttons. Use a converter on the ItemsSource property and then you're binding to an EnumModel. The EnumModel is just a forwarder object to make binding possible. It holds one possible value of the enum and a reference to the viewmodel so it can translate a property on the viewmodel to and from a boolean.

Here's an untested but generic version:

<ItemsControl ItemsSource="{Binding Converter={StaticResource theConverter} ConverterParameter="SomeEnumProperty"}">
    <ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
        <DataTemplate>
            <RadioButton IsChecked="{Binding IsChecked}">
                <TextBlock Text="{Binding Name}" />
            </RadioButton>
        </DataTemplate>
    </ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
</ItemsControl>

The converter:

public class ToEnumModelsConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        var viewmodel = value;
        var prop = viewmodel.GetType().GetProperty(parameter as string);

        List<EnumModel> enumModels = new List<EnumModel>();

        foreach(var enumValue in Enum.GetValues(prop.PropertyType))
        {
            var enumModel = new EnumModel(enumValue, viewmodel, prop);
            enumModels.Add(enumModel);
        }

        return enumModels;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

The EnumModel:

public class EnumModel : INPC
{
    object enumValue;
    INotifyPropertyChanged viewmodel;
    PropertyInfo property;

    public EnumModel(object enumValue, object viewmodel, PropertyInfo property)
    {
        this.enumValue = enumValue;
        this.viewmodel = viewmodel as INotifyPropertyChanged;
        this.property = property;

        this.viewmodel.PropertyChanged += new PropertyChangedEventHandler(viewmodel_PropertyChanged);
    }

    void viewmodel_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.PropertyName == property.Name)
        {
            OnPropertyChanged("IsChecked");
        }
    }

    public bool IsChecked
    {
        get
        {
            return property.GetValue(viewmodel, null).Equals(enumValue);
        }
        set
        {
            if (value)
            {
                property.SetValue(viewmodel, enumValue, null);
            }
        }
    }
}

For a code sample that I know works (but it's still quite unpolished - WIP!), you can see http://code.google.com/p/pdx/source/browse/trunk/PDX/PDX/Toolkit/EnumControl.xaml.cs. This only works within the context of my library, but it demonstrates setting the Name of the EnumModel based on the DescriptionAttribute, which might be useful to you.

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This isn't a bad option. I opened another question before I fully understood this. If I get an answer to that question, it will allow you to essentially combine the converter and EnumValue classes, and will avoid doing manual reflections in your code - the binding would look up and set the appropriate properties. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham May 5 '11 at 20:18
    
The other problem is that I have two fields on my View Model: ItemSelections and SelectedItem. I'm not actually using an enum, so Enum.GetValues won't work. I know I could parse the parameter and pull two properties names out of it, but that feels kludgy. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham May 5 '11 at 21:21
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You are so close. When you are need two bindings for one converter you need a MultiBinding and a IMultiValueConverter! The syntax is a little more verbose but no more difficult.

Edit:

Here's a little code to get you started.

The binding:

<RadioButton Content="{Binding Name}"
        Grid.Column="0">
    <RadioButton.IsChecked>
        <MultiBinding Converter="{StaticResource EqualsConverter}">
            <Binding Path="SelectedItem"/>
            <Binding Path="Name"/>
        </MultiBinding>
    </RadioButton.IsChecked>
</RadioButton>

and the converter:

public class EqualsConverter : IMultiValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object[] values, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return values[0].Equals(values[1]);
    }

    public object[] ConvertBack(object value, Type[] targetTypes, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

Second Edit:

The above approach is not useful to implement two-way binding using the technique linked in the question because the necessary information is not available when converting back.

The correct solution I believe is straight-up MVVM: code the view-model to match the needs of the view. The amount of code is quite small and obviates the need for any converters or funny bindings or tricks.

Here is the XAML;

<Grid>
    <ItemsControl ItemsSource="{Binding}">
        <ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
            <DataTemplate>
                <RadioButton
                    GroupName="Value"
                    Content="{Binding Description}"
                    IsChecked="{Binding IsChecked, Mode=TwoWay}"/>
            </DataTemplate>
        </ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
    </ItemsControl>
</Grid>

and code-behind to simulate the view-model:

        DataContext = new CheckBoxValueCollection(new[] { "Foo", "Bar", "Baz" });

and some view-model infrastructure:

    public class CheckBoxValue : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        private string description;
        private bool isChecked;

        public string Description
        {
            get { return description; }
            set { description = value; OnPropertyChanged("Description"); }
        }
        public bool IsChecked
        {
            get { return isChecked; }
            set { isChecked = value; OnPropertyChanged("IsChecked"); }
        }

        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

        protected void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
        {
            if (PropertyChanged != null) PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }

    public class CheckBoxValueCollection : ObservableCollection<CheckBoxValue>
    {
        public CheckBoxValueCollection(IEnumerable<string> values)
        {
            foreach (var value in values)
                this.Add(new CheckBoxValue { Description = value });
            this[0].IsChecked = true;
        }

        public string SelectedItem
        {
            get { return this.First(item => item.IsChecked).Description; }
        }
    }
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1  
Actually been playing with that since I posted the question. MultiValueConverter seems to convert from one value to two, and vice-versa. If I convert from { theSelectedInstance, thisInstance } to a boolean, that's easy. The tricky part is how do I convert from a boolean to the instance. When I set IsChecked to true or manually check it, how do I get the instance to set SelectedItem with? I think I'd still end up having to bind to the converter parameter for that to work... –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham May 5 '11 at 2:44
1  
This approach is doomed for two-way binding with a dynamic enumeration because a converter parameter cannot use databinding. You'll have to switch to a SelectedIndex approach and then the radio buttons can use integers. –  Rick Sladkey May 5 '11 at 3:32
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Now that I know about x:Shared (thanks to your other question), I renounce my previous answer and say that a MultiBinding is the way to go after all.

The XAML:

<StackPanel>
    <TextBlock Text="{Binding SelectedChoice}" />

    <ItemsControl ItemsSource="{Binding Choices}">
        <ItemsControl.Resources>
            <local:MyConverter x:Key="myConverter" x:Shared="false" />
        </ItemsControl.Resources>
        <ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
            <DataTemplate>
                <RadioButton>
                    <RadioButton.IsChecked>
                        <MultiBinding Converter="{StaticResource myConverter}" >
                            <Binding Path="DataContext.SelectedChoice" RelativeSource="{RelativeSource AncestorType=UserControl}" />
                            <Binding Path="DataContext" RelativeSource="{RelativeSource Mode=Self}" />
                        </MultiBinding>
                    </RadioButton.IsChecked>
                    <TextBlock Text="{Binding}" />
                </RadioButton>
            </DataTemplate>
        </ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
    </ItemsControl>
</StackPanel>

The viewmodel:

class Viewmodel : INPC
{
    public Viewmodel()
    {
        Choices = new List<string>() { "one", "two", "three" };
        SelectedChoice = Choices[0];
    }

    public List<string> Choices { get; set; }

    string selectedChoice;
    public string SelectedChoice
    {
        get { return selectedChoice; }
        set
        {
            if (selectedChoice != value)
            {
                selectedChoice = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("SelectedChoice");
            }
        }
    }
}

The converter:

public class MyConverter : IMultiValueConverter
{
    object selectedValue;
    object myValue;

    public object Convert(object[] values, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        selectedValue = values[0];
        myValue = values[1];

        return selectedValue == myValue;
    }

    public object[] ConvertBack(object value, Type[] targetTypes, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        if ((bool)value)
        {
            return new object[] { myValue, Binding.DoNothing };
        }
        else
        {
            return new object[] { Binding.DoNothing, Binding.DoNothing };
        }

    }
}
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