Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Im designing a simple dealership site that involves several features. Users can sign on and make posts for cars.

Posts can either be for New Cars/ Used Cars:

`new_posts` database has the following fields
- id
- title
- price_from
- price_to
- date_submitted

`used_posts` database has the following
- id
- title
- price_from
- price_to
- year_from
- year_to
- date_submitted

Notice how there is duplication of the attributes. I run into issues like this often and wanted to know what is the best way to deal with this. I have average knowledge of database normalization but i can use any help i can get.

Thanks

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are many options, but two core ideas:

  1. Merge the tables into one and have the fields for the used car be optional.
  2. Extract the fields which make up a vehicle and that's your base table. Then you could create other tables - truck, van, SUV, new, used - that contain fields. You'd then need bridge tables to join them back to your base vehicle table.

The first option is easy to implement, but difficult to scale. The second is more complex, but scales easier.

Personally, I'd merge the two tables. It may not impress any DBAs, but it's practical from an application perspective.

share|improve this answer
    
This was the solution i had in mind because i need it to scale, but basically what you are saying is take out all the fields that are generic to all 'vehicles' and put them in one database. Then take out all discrepancies using other tables that you can later JOIN onto the main one? –  1337holiday May 5 '11 at 2:54
1  
You should look up object relational mismatch and specifically look for mapping inheritance based structures. The idea is similar to what Jason is suggesting in step 2. –  PhD May 5 '11 at 3:04

How about something like this?

posts
- id
- title
- price_from
- price_to
- year_from (nullable)
- year_to (nullable)
- date_submitted
- is_used (yes/no)
share|improve this answer
    
I have thought about using this but my concern was that if the differences gets larger which they will in the future, would this still be the best approach? eg. if i added the field images to used_posts only. –  1337holiday May 5 '11 at 2:51
1  
Heard of YAGNI? You ain't gonna need it. How much in the future are you talking about? Would it be okay to just have nullable foreign keys for the images table? Wouldn't images of new cars also be worthwhile? You could just have a type column for new/used instead of Boolean. Just an enum. This WILL have better performance in the long run. Nullable data is acceptable and your difference is only 2 columns! Do the simplest thing that works and don't over design too much up front. Factor in some future directions which have a high probability of occurring... –  PhD May 5 '11 at 3:02
    
Yea you are Right (YAGIN nice!). Im thinking this is the way i need to go because the other method comes with a learning curve. Thanks! –  1337holiday May 5 '11 at 3:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.