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By default, how will the CLR marshal a structure that contains only a single field, but defines multiple methods, properties, operators, etc., when calling an unmanaged function through P/Invoke?
A simplified version of the structure in question might look something like the following:

public struct SimpleStruct
{
    private IntPtr _value;

    public SimpleStruct(IntPtr value)
    {
       this._value = value;
    }

    public int MyMethod()
    {
       return 42;
    }
}

The specific unmanaged function being called here is irrelevant, so for the sake of discussion, just assume something simple from the Windows API, like this one:

[DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
public static extern bool IsWindow(SimpleStruct hWnd);

In particular, I'm interested in whether the structure gets marshaled as if it were an IntPtr type, or if the CLR attempts to marshal the structure as it would a more complex structure with multiple fields. I realize that "under the hood", all primitive types (including IntPtr and Int32) are implemented as structures. But I am not sure if there's some special-casing built in that handles these "known" structures representing primitive types differently than it would handle a custom-defined one.

I understand that only the fields within the type are accessible, and any methods, properties, or events are inaccessible from unmanaged code, and that's exactly what I want. I'd like to get the above structure marshaled to the unmanaged function exactly the same way as if the declaration were rewritten to specify a parameter of type IntPtr:

[DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
public static extern bool IsWindow(IntPtr hWnd);

Corollarily, does the behavior change when adding the following attributes to the structure's definition?

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
public struct OtherStruct
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    private IntPtr _value;

    public SimpleStruct(IntPtr value)
    {
       this._value = value;
    }

    public int MyMethod()
    {
       return 42;
    }
}

I've only ever used the FieldOffsetAttribute when simulating a union (i.e., multiple fields), but I've seen this done in some of Microsoft's own code, ostensibly to achieve the behavior I ask about above.

Is there any difference in the case where only a single field is defined? Or does this just make the default behavior more explicit?

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Since a struct with just one field is stored in memory the same as just that field would be, I can't imagine that the Interop system would do anything different with one vs. the other. –  Gabe May 5 '11 at 4:02
1  
@Gabe: That's my gut feeling, too. And everything "works" just fine. I'm more curious about the implementation details, and thus whether there's a potential performance or other hidden penalty I might have to pay for later. This site is partially what makes me question that assumption—see the section on "System Value Types" that indicates System.Int32 is marshaled as ELEMENT_TYPE_I4 "instead of as a structure containing a single member of type long". –  Cody Gray May 5 '11 at 4:08
    
The part of the passage that says "you marshal them in the same way ..." indicates to me that it's just saying that you can use System.Int32 to send data to a C function that expects a long; you don't have to write your C function to expect a struct { long }. –  Gabe May 5 '11 at 5:56
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1 Answer

With regards to your question about implicit/explicit:

This will result in the exact same thing. The default LayoutKind (for C#) is Sequential, and the first element in a struct with this layout is always at offset 0. (The following elements' positions will depend on the packing chosen, as described in the second link.)

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