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e.g. The inverse color from black should be white.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

iOS5+

-(UIColor*) inverseColor
{
    CGFloat r,g,b,a;
    [self getRed:&r green:&g blue:&b alpha:&a];
    return [UIColor colorWithRed:1.-r green:1.-g blue:1.-b alpha:a];
}
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What does "1." meaning? –  iwill Jan 9 '13 at 9:23
    
It's the same as "1.0"(double) or "1f"(float). It just informs the compiler that we'll be using a float instead of an integer. –  mindw0rk Jan 23 '13 at 9:49

This should work:

// oldColor is the UIColor to invert
const CGFloat *componentColors = CGColorGetComponents(oldColor.CGColor);

UIColor *newColor = [[UIColor alloc] initWithRed:(1.0 - componentColors[0])
                                           green:(1.0 - componentColors[1])
                                            blue:(1.0 - componentColors[2])
                                           alpha:componentColors[3]];

Source: Check if UIColor is dark or bright?

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Thanks, your answer is very good. But if the oldColor is [UIColor colorWithWhite:1 alpha:1], the newColor will be transparent. –  iwill May 5 '11 at 16:35
    
Perfect answer. Thanks for this, Sir. –  Sid Apr 30 '13 at 14:56
1  
This does only work with RGB colors. The answer by iwill below is better. –  Christian Beer Aug 27 '13 at 7:45

Based on @grc's answer, I create a UIColor category with this method:

- (UIColor *)inverseColor {

    CGColorRef oldCGColor = self.CGColor;

    int numberOfComponents = CGColorGetNumberOfComponents(oldCGColor);

    // can not invert - the only component is the alpha
    // e.g. self == [UIColor groupTableViewBackgroundColor]
    if (numberOfComponents == 1) {
        return [UIColor colorWithCGColor:oldCGColor];
    }

    const CGFloat *oldComponentColors = CGColorGetComponents(oldCGColor);
    CGFloat newComponentColors[numberOfComponents];

    int i = numberOfComponents - 1;
    newComponentColors[i] = oldComponentColors[i]; // alpha
    while (--i >= 0) {
        newComponentColors[i] = 1 - oldComponentColors[i];
    }

    CGColorRef newCGColor = CGColorCreate(CGColorGetColorSpace(oldCGColor), newComponentColors);
    UIColor *newColor = [UIColor colorWithCGColor:newCGColor];
    CGColorRelease(newCGColor);

    return newColor;
}

Is it OK? Hope this is helpful.

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The solution from GRC has an issue: CGColorGetComponents returns in a scale of 0.0-1.0, and not from 2-255. So you should use

UIColor *newColor = [[UIColor alloc] initWithRed:(1.0 - componentColors[0])
                                           green:(1.0 - componentColors[1])
                                            blue:(1.0 - componentColors[2])
                                           alpha:componentColors[3]];

instead. Else everything will be white (1.0 and lager)

kind of the same thing as amleszk used, there it's also 1.-color, instead of 255. Btw that 1. represents the float 1.0, you should rather type 1.0 in stead of 1., to avoid confusion

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You did not get inverse colors for Gray.. So effects when you use gray back ground and its inverse color as text color

THIS Works even for gray color, i just added some additional code to @iWills code.

//====== TO GET THE OPPOSIT COLORS =====
-(UIColor *)reverseColorOf :(UIColor *)oldColor
{
    CGColorRef oldCGColor = oldColor.CGColor;

    int numberOfComponents = CGColorGetNumberOfComponents(oldCGColor);
    // can not invert - the only component is the alpha
    if (numberOfComponents == 1) {
        return [UIColor colorWithCGColor:oldCGColor];
    }

    const CGFloat *oldComponentColors = CGColorGetComponents(oldCGColor);
    CGFloat newComponentColors[numberOfComponents];

    int i = numberOfComponents - 1;
    newComponentColors[i] = oldComponentColors[i]; // alpha
    while (--i >= 0) {
        newComponentColors[i] = 1 - oldComponentColors[i];
    }

    CGColorRef newCGColor = CGColorCreate(CGColorGetColorSpace(oldCGColor), newComponentColors);
    UIColor *newColor = [UIColor colorWithCGColor:newCGColor];
    CGColorRelease(newCGColor);

    //=====For the GRAY colors 'Middle level colors'
    CGFloat white = 0;
    [oldColor getWhite:&white alpha:nil];

    if(white>0.3 && white < 0.67)
    {
        if(white >= 0.5)
            newColor = [UIColor darkGrayColor];
        else if (white < 0.5)
            newColor = [UIColor blackColor];

    }
    return newColor;
}
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Swift way is to extend UIColor:

extension UIColor {
    func inverse () -> UIColor {
        var r:CGFloat = 0.0; var g:CGFloat = 0.0; var b:CGFloat = 0.0; var a:CGFloat = 0.0;
        if self.getRed(&r, green: &g, blue: &b, alpha: &a) {
            return UIColor(red: 1.0-r, green: 1.0 - g, blue: 1.0 - b, alpha: a)
        }
        return self
    }
}
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So to be helpful for all swifters came here looking for the answer - this is how it should look like in swift:

func inverseColor(color: UIColor) -> UIColor{
    var a: CGFloat = 0.0; var r: CGFloat = 0.0; var g: CGFloat = 0.0; var b: CGFloat = 0.0;
    color.getRed(&r, green: &g, blue: &b, alpha: &a);
    return UIColor(red: -r, green: -g, blue: -b, alpha: a);
}
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