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Iv'e coded a ObjectLoader that takes a .obj file and it gives me what i want. My problem is that when handling big files(not even that big, about 80kb) i eventually end up with not getting all information because it stops reading after a while.

I get this in my LogCat before im done and debuger simply moves on to next method:

DEBUG/dalvikvm(25743): GC_FOR_MALLOC freed 2076 objects / 124280 bytes in 50ms
DEBUG/dalvikvm(25743): GC_FOR_MALLOC freed 4 objects / 232 bytes in 52ms
DEBUG/dalvikvm(25743): GC_FOR_MALLOC freed 142 objects / 46728 bytes in 49ms
DEBUG/dalvikvm(25743): GC_FOR_MALLOC freed 0 objects / 0 bytes in 53ms DEBUG/dalvikvm(25743): GC_FOR_MALLOC freed 533 objects / 63504 bytes in 39ms
DEBUG/dalvikvm(25743): GC_FOR_MALLOC freed 4 objects / 216 bytes in 50ms
DEBUG/dalvikvm(25743): GC_EXTERNAL_ALLOC freed 132 objects / 26768 bytes in 40ms

In other words, alot of Garbage Collection i guess. Is it simply because i allocate to much memory in my code? And if so, is there any basics I need to read into or do you have any other suggestions? I'm using 4 Vectors each ending up holding about 2K-3K objects. Edit: There's acctually 7 vectors, 3 extra for carrying indexes, but still i don't think it's that much.

    private void readObj(InputStreamReader in) throws IOException
{
    BufferedReader reader = null;
    String line = null;

    reader = new BufferedReader(in);

    while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null)
    {
        Log.v(TAG, line);
        if (line.startsWith("f"))
        {
            faces++;
            processFLine(line);
        } else if (line.startsWith("vn"))
        {
            normals++;
            processVNLine(line);
        } else if (line.startsWith("vt"))
        {
            UVCoords++;
            processVTLine(line);
        } else if (line.startsWith("v"))
        {
            vertices++;
            processVLine(line);
        }
    }

}

private void processVNLine(String line)
{
    String[] tokens = line.split("[ ]+");
    int c = tokens.length;
    for (int i = 1; i < c; i++)
    {
        _vn.add(Float.valueOf(tokens[i]));
    }
}

private void processFLine(String line)
{
    String[] tokens = line.split("[ ]+");
    int c = tokens.length;

    if (tokens[1].matches("[0-9]+"))
    {
        caseFEqOne(tokens, c);
    }
    if (tokens[1].matches("[0-9]+/[0-9]+"))
    {
        caseFEqTwo(tokens, c);
    }
    if (tokens[1].matches("[0-9]+//[0-9]+"))
    {
        caseFEqOneAndThree(tokens, c);
    }
    if (tokens[1].matches("[0-9]+/[0-9]+/[0-9]+"))
    {
        caseFEqThree(tokens, c);
    }

}

private void caseFEqThree(String[] tokens, int c)
{
    for (int i = 1; i < c; i++)
    {
        Short s = Short.valueOf(tokens[i].split("/")[0]);
        s--;
        _vPointer.add(s);

        s = Short.valueOf(tokens[i].split("/")[1]);
        s--;
        _vtPointer.add(s);

        s = Short.valueOf(tokens[i].split("/")[2]);
        s--;
        _vnPointer.add(s);
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
That doesn't sound like a lot of memory. There's a problem somewhere else besides those vectors. –  Ted Hopp May 5 '11 at 6:43
    
I don't think anyone can offer a useful answer without looking at the code ... or at least the data structures. –  Stephen C May 5 '11 at 6:48
    
Allright, I will post some code from the class. Maybe there's something really stupid i've made. Never really cared for memory allocation. –  Henrik May 5 '11 at 6:48
    
99.9% garbage collection is not your problem, because it simply can't cause that kind of problem. It can only slow down your program, but not cause it to malfunction (except if you use up all available memory, but that would cause the process to suddenly terminate, not return incomplete result). –  Jan Hudec May 5 '11 at 7:03
    
mmmh, are you closing the streams after using them? –  Danilo Tommasina May 5 '11 at 7:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well I got the answer now, and it's embarrassing... As you all said, it wasn't the garbage collectors fault. It was the LogCat's fault. And not the fact that it printed out thoose line about the garbage collecting, it's about the fact that it didn't print out my Log.i(tag, string) that i used when the loop was finished. (During the loop i used Log.v(). So it did infact not give me incomplete result, i just wasn't able to see the full result or that it acctually finished. Well anyway, im sorry for taking up your'e time with this and i would like to thanks, to thoose of you that tried to help.

If any Moderator see this you can close the question. Otherwise i will delete it soon.

share|improve this answer

I can see one systematic mistake that you are making, though I don't know if it is the cause of your problems.

For example:

String[] tokens = line.split("[ ]+");
int c = tokens.length;
for (int i = 1; i < c; i++)
{
    _vn.add(Float.valueOf(tokens[i]));
}

In Java, array indexes start at zero, and go up to array.length - 1. Your code seems to be skipping the zeroth token, here and in other places. And in processFLine where you use tokens[1] to chose between different formats, you could get an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException as a result.

share|improve this answer
    
Well that is because i'm not intrested in the first (index 0), simply because iv'e got several lines built up like this in my file: v 0.000 1.000 0.000 (for example) so i want to skip the 'v' –  Henrik May 5 '11 at 7:19

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