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I have a function that need to analyze packet after packet and decide what to do. For each packet the code must:

  1. Read a packet, on timeout return an error code.
  2. Check for corruption, if positive log it and and go to 1.
  3. Check for an abort packet, if positive log it and return and aborted code.
  4. Check for illegality of the parameters of the packet, if positive log it, respond with an invalid parameters packet and go to 1.
  5. Run the action of the packet, if failed log it, respond with an failure packet and go to 1.
  6. If the packet is an end packet, return success.

My code look like this:

Packet p;
for (;;) {  
    int ret = receive(&p, time);
    if (ret == TIMEOUT) {
        log("timeout");
        return TIMEOUT;
    }
    if (ret != 0) {
        log("corrupted %d", ret);
        continue;
    }

    if (p.type == ABORT) {
        log("abort");
        return ABORT;
    }

    ret = check(&p);
    if (ret != 0) {
        log("invalid %d", ret);
        respond(&p, INVALID);
        continue;
    }

    ret = execute(&p);
    if (ret != 0) {
        log("failure %d", ret);
        respond(&p, FAILURE);
        continue;
    }

    if (is_last(&p)) {
        finalize(&p);
        return 0;
    }
}

Are there a better structured way for this code that is not unnecessary nested or long?

share|improve this question
2  
It's definitely a personal choice but what you have looks good to me! –  Nick May 5 '11 at 7:47
    
As a rule, the best way to structure your code is whatever way is easiest for you to maintain. Don't choose a pattern that doesn't make sense to you just because someone tells you it's better. –  tylerl Jun 5 '11 at 5:42

6 Answers 6

Instead of having multiple returns in the loop you could use break and do a final return:

Packet p;
int ret;
for (;;) {  
    ret = receive(&p, time);
    if (ret == TIMEOUT) {
        log("timeout");
        break;
    }
    if (ret != 0) {
        log("corrupted %d", ret);
        continue;
    }

    if (p.type == ABORT) {
        log("abort");
        break;
    }

    .
    .
    .

    if (is_last(&p)) {
        finalize(&p);
        ret = 0;
        break;
    }
}
return ret;
share|improve this answer
2  
It is commonly recommended to have only one return statement in a function. As a general rule, I wholeheartedly disagree with this rule. Often, a function is clearer if you have explicit return statements when the function is intended to return, rather than having to follow the code trickling down the the end of the function. In addition, if you really must do something at the end of a function, it much clearer to model this using two function, where the outer function do whatever had to be done at the end, and the inner use early returns. –  Lindydancer May 5 '11 at 10:06
    
@Lindydancer: I totally agree to you that banning multiple returns is overrated. That's why I wrote "you could" and not "you should/have to". In this given case, however, using the breaks doesn't make it less clear AND it still gives the benefit of having one single return, without the need of using another function (which I would try to avoid). –  Curd May 8 '11 at 20:21

I think it looks good. It definitely has no unnecessary nesting and even though it seems "long" it's quite brief - unless you want to move the logging inside the receive(), check() and execute() functions.

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I would try to avoid returning from inside the loop. Instead break and have a single return at the end of the function. Looks ok apart from that.

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Can you explain why? There's really no compelling reason to stay inside a method once you are done with it, and a return statement is a clean way to exit, no matter where it is, or how many there are. –  Robert Harvey May 5 '11 at 14:40
    
It makes debugging more difficult if you return from more than one place. It's also more scalable in the event you want to add a function call before returning because you'll only have to add it once. –  Craig May 5 '11 at 15:12
    
Totally disagree that it makes debugging more difficult, and your second sentence is a hypothetical (YAGNI). Use the single return statement if your architecture requires it, but otherwise it's just a lot of ceremony for no additional benefit. –  Robert Harvey May 5 '11 at 15:22

It's personal preference but I personally do not like infinite loops or the continue keyword. I'd do it something like:

Packet p = { /* some dummy init that doesn't flag islast() true */};
int ret = 0;
while (ret != TIMEOUT && p.type != ABORT && !islast(&p)) 
{  
    int ret = receive(&p, time);
    if (ret != TIMEOUT) 
    {
        if (ret != 0) 
        {
            log("corrupted %d", ret);
        }
        else if (p.type != ABORT)
        {
            ret = check(&p);
            if (ret != 0) 
            {
                log("invalid %d", ret);
                respond(&p, INVALID);
            }
            else
            {
                ret = execute(&p);
                if (ret != 0) 
                {
                    log("failure %d", ret);
                    respond(&p, FAILURE);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

if (ret == TIMEOUT)
{
    log("timeout");
}
else if (p.type == ABORT)
{
    log("abort");
    ret = ABORT;
}
else
{
    finalise(&p);
}
return ret;

My version looks more complicated than yours but that is because it more accurately reflects the structure of the algorithm. In my opinion (and it is only an opinion), keywords like continue and break obfuscate the structure and should not be used.

Other than this, the other main advantage is that, in my version, you can clearly see the conditions that cause loop exit by just looking in one place i.e. the loop condition. Also, conditions that cause the loop to quite are handled outside the loop - conceptually the right place. There's also only one exit point for the function.

share|improve this answer
    
My real code has 7 if (cond) continue/return, eight level of nesting are too many. –  user586237 May 5 '11 at 9:57
1  
@user586237 I would strongly recommend against this style of code, which is hard to read, error prone, redundant, artificial, and requires knowing internals of the Packet structure. I honestly wouldn't hire someone who submitted this. –  Jim Balter May 5 '11 at 10:52
    
@user586237: Incorrect, eight levels is not too many. You have eight levels of structure. You therefore should have eight levels of nesting to reflect this - or you should refactor e.g. factor out the inside of the loop into a separate funtion. Using continue is no better than just deleting leading tab characters to remove indentation. –  JeremyP May 5 '11 at 10:53

A lot of people don't like assignments nested in if statements, but I don't think there's any rational basis for that. Using them allows compact code like the following (which I don't claim is "best"; that is highly subjective):

for( ;; ){
    Packet p;
    int ret;

    if( (ret = receive(&p, time)) == TIMEOUT ){
        log("timeout");
        return TIMEOUT;
    }else if( ret != 0 ){
        log("corrupted %d", ret);
    }else if( p.type == ABORT ){
        log("abort");
        return ABORT;
    }else if( (ret = check(&p)) != 0 ){
        log("invalid %d", ret);
        respond(&p, INVALID);
    }else if( (ret = execute(&p)) != 0 ){
        log("failure %d", ret);
        respond(&p, FAILURE);
    }else if( is_last(&p) ){
        finalize(&p);
        return 0;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

A rule of thumb is avoid reusing the same variable over and over again. If it's used for something new, create a new one instead. For example, when I read your code I missed the fact that ret was redefined along the way. Another advantage is that if a value is defined and immediately used, you can often define it in a smaller scope.

For example:

ret = execute(&p);
if (ret != 0) {
    log("failure %d", ret);
    respond(&p, FAILURE);
    continue;
}

You can rewrite this into:

{
  int ret_exe = execute(&p);
  if (ret_exe != 0) {
      log("failure %d", ret_exe);
      respond(&p, FAILURE);
      continue;
  }
}

Or, if you are using C99 or C++:

if (int ret_exe = execute(&p)) {
  log("failure %d", ret_exe);
  respond(&p, FAILURE);
  continue;
}
share|improve this answer
    
if (int ret_exe = execute(&p)) is not legal C (99 or otherwise). –  Jim Balter May 5 '11 at 10:39
    
That's not been a "rule of thumb" anywhere in my experience, and I don't think it's a particularly good one. Reuse of generic temp names like i, rc, ret, etc. is common and quite readable. –  Jim Balter May 5 '11 at 10:47
    
@Jim: You are, of course, correct. I've updated the answer. –  Lindydancer May 5 '11 at 11:22

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