Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have an array which contains the starting 2 characters of postcode areas in perl like so:

@acceptedPostcodes = ("CV", "LE", "CM", "CB", "EN", "SG", "NN", "MK", "LU", "PE", "ST", "TF", "DE", "WS");

I have a search box where a user will type in part or a full post code. I need to check if the post code they entered started with one of the elements of the array so for example if they entered 'CV2 1DH' it would evaluate to true and if they entered something like 'YO1 8WE' it would evalute to false as it doesn't start with one of the array values.

Now this would be easy to do in PHP for me but Perl isnt something im too good at and so far my efforts havn't been very fruitful.

Any idea peeps?

share|improve this question
    
just to add its a .cgi script not sure if this makes any difference. –  SubstanceD May 5 '11 at 9:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If your list of accepted postcodes is large enough that performance in the matching code is an actual concern (it probably isn't), you'd probably be better off using a hash lookup instead of an array anyhow:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my %accepted_postcodes = ("CV" => 1, "LE" => 1, "CM" => 1, "CB" => 1, "EN" => 1, "SG" => 1, "NN" => 1, "MK" => 1, "LU" => 1, "PE" => 1, "ST" => 1, "TF" => 1, "DE" => 1, "WS" => 1);
# Or, to be more terse:
# my %accepted_postcodes = map { $_ => 1 } qw(CV LE CM CB EN SG NN MK LU PE ST TF DE WS);

my $postcode = "CV21 1AA";

if (exists $accepted_postcodes{substr $postcode, 0, 2}) {
    print "$postcode is OK\n" ;
} else {
    print "$postcode is not OK\n";
}

This method will work fine with 5.8.8.

share|improve this answer
    
Good one, and is indeed fastest so far even with the small data set. –  user159335 May 5 '11 at 11:02
    
Even though the other solutions look great I went with this one simply because it worked without too much playing around. The good thing is my data set of postcode areas is only about 12-15 so I shouldn't have any speed issues to worry about. Thanks to eveyone for there answers. –  SubstanceD May 5 '11 at 11:32

Smart Match (~~) is your friend here (after you use substr to get the first two letters from the entered string.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use v5.10;

my @acceptedPostcodes = ("CV", "LE", "CM", "CB", "EN", "SG", "NN", "MK", "LU", "PE", "ST", "TF", "DE", "WS");

my $postcode = "CV21 1AA";

if ((substr $postcode, 0, 2) ~~ @acceptedPostcodes) {
    say "$postcode is OK" ;
} else {
    say "$postcode is not OK";
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is available only from Perl 5.10. –  Colin Fine May 5 '11 at 9:42
    
Versions of Perl 5 older than 5.10 have been EOLed, and 5.10 has been superseded by 5.12. I really wouldn't do new development against 5.8 today. –  Quentin May 5 '11 at 9:45
    
im sure this is a very silly question but whats the easiest way to find out which version im using? –  SubstanceD May 5 '11 at 10:00
    
Type perl --version at the command line. –  Quentin May 5 '11 at 10:01
1  
Smart match isn't very performant, having to iterate through the whole list each time. Since it's a static list, and you're going to do the work a lot, you're better off turning it into a hash. –  Schwern May 5 '11 at 14:34

Ok, an old fashioned foreach version, note that it does a case sensitive match. Benchmarked about the same as the ~~ version interestingly.

sub validatePostcode($)
{
  my ($testPostcode) = @_;
  my @acceptedPostcodes = ("CV", "LE", "CM", "CB", "EN", "SG", "NN", "MK", "LU", "PE", "ST", "TF", "DE", "WS");

  $testPostcode = substr($testPostcode, 0, 2);
  foreach my $postcode (@acceptedPostcodes)
  {
   if($postcode eq $testPostcode)
   {
    return 1;
   }
  }

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

You can use List::Util's first, or the grep builtin:

use List::Util 'first';

my $postcode = substr $input, 0, 2;    
my $status = (first {$_ eq $postcode} @acceptedPostcodes) ? 1 : 0;
share|improve this answer
    
Marked it up cos it's right, but it benchmarks substantially slower than both foreach and ~~ solutions. –  user159335 May 5 '11 at 10:17
    
@JonB: List::Util is written in C for speed, so it will not be much slower than grep/foreach/~~. –  eugene y May 5 '11 at 10:24
    
I just tried them. It's a minimal benchmark but on 2000000 iterations I got approx 35 seconds for foreach and ~~ but List::Util hit around 60. –  user159335 May 5 '11 at 10:41
    
@JonB If I had to guess why smart match is faster, List::Util still has to run a Perl subroutine on each element. Smart match can stay entirely inside C. They both will stop when they hit the first element. Smart match is so fast, the size of the array does not have a significant impact, 40 elements or 4 million, whereas List::Util slows down worse than linearly and must undergo the overhead of passing in the array. If you have 5.10, use smart match. –  Schwern May 5 '11 at 14:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.