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Take a look at this:

template<class T>
struct X
{
private:
    T value_;
public:
    X():value_(T()) {}
    X(T value):value_(value) {}

    T getValue() const
    {
        return value_;
    }

    static const T value = 0; //this is dummy

    template<class D, class U>
    friend decltype(X<D>::value + X<U>::value) operator + (X<D> lhs, X<U> rhs);
};

template<class T, class U>
decltype(X<T>::value + X<U>::value) operator + (X<T> lhs, X<U> rhs)
{
    return lhs.getValue() + rhs.getValue();
    /* THIS COMPILES WITH VS2010 but line below doesn't which is incorrect
     * behaviour in my opinion because: friendship has been declared and
     * access to private data should be granted.*/
    return lhs.value_ + rhs.value_; //THIS COMPILES WITH GCC 4.6
}

And after example like this there must come the question (by the way the whole example compiles and works as intended), anyway here is the question:

Do we really have to have the pug ugly syntax with late return type? As I proved in this example it can be done "the normal way".

Edited (now without this dreaded static dummy - all singing all dancing)

template<class T>
struct X
{
private:
    T value_;
public:
    typedef T value_type;

    X():value_(T()) {}
    X(T value):value_(value) {}
    T getValue()const { return value_; }

    template<class D, class U>
    friend X<decltype(typename X<D>::value_type() + typename X<U>::value_type())> operator + (X<D> lhs, X<U> rhs);
};

template<class T, class U>
X<decltype(typename X<T>::value_type() + typename X<U>::value_type())> operator + (X<T> lhs, X<U> rhs)
{
    return lhs.getValue() + rhs.getValue();
    //return lhs.value_ + rhs.value_; //VS is __wrong__ not allowing this code to compile
}
share|improve this question
    
What's the compilation error on VS2010? –  Nathan Ernst May 5 '11 at 20:52

5 Answers 5

Sometimes it just doesn't work without trailing return type, because the compiler has no way of knowing what the programmer asks it to do or what the involved types are.

Take this simple forwarding-wrapper template function (that's not a made up example, but taken from some real code I wrote not long ago):

template<typename T, typename... A> auto fwd(T fp, A...a) -> decltype(fp(a...))
{
    // some other code
    return fp(a...);
};

This function can be called with any kind of unknown function pointer that has any kind of unknown return type. It will work, it will return the correct type, and it doesn't confuse the compiler.

Without the trailing return type, the compiler would have no way of figuring out what's going on.

You could get a similar effect with a #define and abusing the comma operator, but eugh... at what price.

share|improve this answer
    
But why did the language architects not choose decltype(fp(a...)) fwd(T fp, A...a) instead. It's just syntax. I guess there's a syntactic issue? –  user2023370 Jan 21 '12 at 11:19
    
That's something I can't answer, only someone in the committee would know. My guess is that it would require two passes over the source, one pass only to gather the type information, and the second one with decltype filled in (and possibly recursion, ouch). The way the parser gets to see the source, this won't work in one pass, because at the time decltype() is seen, it has no clue what the stuff in parenthese refers to (even if it becomes clear later in the same line). They probably didn't want to make parsing that convoluted. –  Damon Jan 21 '12 at 14:36

All this is missing the better readability it adds, without needing to use typedefs or alias templates

auto f() -> void(*)();

Compare that to the equivalent

void (*f())();

You can also access this in a late specified return type, but not in the early return type

class A {
  std::vector<int> a;
public:
  auto getVector() -> decltype((a));
  auto getVector() const -> decltype((a));
};

If you had it the other way around, it wouldn't work, because this would not be in scope, and decltype((a)) would have the same type both time (no implicit this would be added, so the type of this could not influence the type of (a)).

share|improve this answer
    
@Johann thanks for your answer, one issue though it doesn't compile with VS2010 sp1 (but that's their problem not yours). Using gcc 4.6 I was able to compile following fnc of A class: decltype((a)) get_vector(); Would you mind and explain to me why this is worst to your version with trailing return type? Undoubtedly my version is more readable, would you agree with me on that? –  There is nothing we can do May 5 '11 at 10:59
    
@There, it will give decltype((a)) always the type std::vector<int>&, no matter whether or not you put that for a const or non-const member function. If you put it in a late specified return type, then it will be std::vector<int> const& when the member function is const. Also, calling functions isn't possible at all if you put the decltype(...) at the early return type (unless you use those ugly workarounds you presented or using declval etc). For calling member functions of A, you have to put it at the end, so this is in scope. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 5 '11 at 11:02
    
@There - VS2010 has the problem that the rules were changed after it was released. I belive the decision to allow decltype((a)) here (a meaning this->a) was made in 2011. –  Bo Persson May 5 '11 at 11:06
    
@Johann which ugly workaround you reffer to? And this whole business with decltype etc came from here: social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/vcgeneral/thread/… where I've tried unsuccessfully declare friend ;) –  There is nothing we can do May 5 '11 at 11:07
    
@There I think you know what I mean. For example, to make @Damon's code work with early return type, you would have to do declval<T>()(declval<A>()...). And then you will some time notice in a few corner cases it's still not equivalent, and start writing declval<T>()(declval<typename std::remove_extent<A>::type*>()...), and then notice how ugly it became, compared to simply writing decltype(fp(a...)). –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 5 '11 at 11:18

It can be done without decltype, but this has some drawbacks. You either need an additional template parameter or you need to rely on the convention that adding two items of type T produces an item of type T.

share|improve this answer
    
but the only point I'm trying to make here is that auto is unnecessary and we can have normal return type position. That's all. –  There is nothing we can do May 5 '11 at 9:45

If I understand you correctly, by "late return type", you mean what C++11 calls the trailing return type. In the case you present, there's no problem, and if you don't want to use the trailing return type, there's no reason to do so. If the return type depends on the argument types, however, it can be extremely verbose to have to repeat them in the decltype:

template <typename T1, typename T2>
auto add( T1 lhs, T2 rhs ) -> decltype( lhs + rhs );

To avoid using the trailing return type, you'd have to write something like:

template <typename T1, typename T2>
decltype( (*(T1*)0 + *(T2*)0 ) add( T1 lhs, T2 rhs );

It's a lot clearer what the return type is in the first example, and if the parameter types are more complicated (e.g. something like std::vector<T1>), it's also a lot more succinct:

template <typename T>
auto findInVector( std::vector<T> const& v ) -> decltype( v.begin() );

vs.

template <typename T>
typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator
        findInVector( std::vector<T> const& v );
share|improve this answer
    
@James as I've shown in my example I don't have to write pug ugly syntax in form ((T1)0 + (T2)0). –  There is nothing we can do May 5 '11 at 10:10
1  
@There is nothing we can do: What you have shown in the example is that you can change the syntax that @James has used if you add a dummy static member to the class, which in my opinion is much worse than @James approach, since you are changing the class design to provide for a particular usage in a function. I.e. the class itself is not driven by the design of what it is modelling, but rather by the awkward need of avoiding the *(T*)0 syntax. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 5 '11 at 10:19
    
@David you are the only (except James) person who thinks that this: ((T1)0 + (T2)0 is better to this: (X<T>::value + X<U>::value). Get serious and if you don't believe me ask around. –  There is nothing we can do May 5 '11 at 10:25
1  
@There is nothing we can do: No, the problem is not with X<T>::value but with the comment in the definition of that static member: //this is dummy, which means that you have changed the class to add something spurious and unneeded in the design just to demonstrate that you can get away without the conversions. You are only looking at the low level C++ quirks and forgetting that when you program you are not exercising the language, but rather solving a problem, and if in the domain of the problem X does not need a value static member, adding it to avoid *(T*)0 is wrong. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 5 '11 at 10:32
3  
@There is nothing we can do: The expression wasn't ((T1)0 +(T2)0), but (*(T1*)0 + *(T2*)0). And my example is taken directly from an example in the standard, so clearly, the majority of the committee members thought it was more likely to be used that introducing unnecessary static variables (which is so horrible that most committee members didn't even think anyone could consider it). –  James Kanze May 5 '11 at 12:53

I don't get this question, are you asking why the language allows you to do:

template <typename T, typename U>
auto foo( X<T> lhs, X<U> rhs ) -> decltype( lhs + rhs );

Instead of forcing you to artificially add a static dummy member to the X template so that you can type:

template <typename T, typename U>
decltype( X<T>::unneeded_artificial_static_member +
          X<U>::unneeded_artificial_static_member )
foo( X<T> lhs, X<U> rhs ) -> decltype( lhs + rhs );

Seriously? I mean, you can use other less burdensome constructs if you want, like:

template <typename T>
T& lvalue_of();

template <typename T, typename U>
decltype( lvalue_of< X<T> > + lvalue_of< X<U> > )
foo( X<T> lhs, X<U> rhs );

And then be forced to use specific variants of the lvalue_of when needed:

template <typename T, typename U>
decltype( lvalue_of< X<T> > + lvalue_of< X<U> const > )
foo( X<T> lhs, X<U> const & rhs );

And then create extra variants for rvalue_ref... for each potential use case that you might come around, but why on earth would you prefer the standard to force you to those weird error prone (will you remember to update the decltype if you change the argument?) constructs to define the type, when after the argument declaration the compiler can so easily do it itself in a safe simple safe way?

With that line of reasoning, you should also drop lambdas from the language altogether, they are not an enabling feature at all. The enabling feature was being able to use a local class in a template:

std::function< void () > f = [](){ std::cout << "Hi"; };

can be easily implemented as:

struct lambda {
   void operator()() {
      std::cout << "Hi";
   }
};
std::function< void () > f = lambda();

And then you can probably think of a good amount of other features that can be as easily dropped from the language, since there are workarounds.

share|improve this answer
    
@David yes I do see that you don't get this question. Let me slowly explain once again: The only thing I'm questioning here (and forget my artificial demo example) is that we don't really need auto keyword (I've proved this, you've proved this) and if commitee would worked bit better we could have avoid completely trailing-return-type. That's all what I'm saying here. –  There is nothing we can do May 5 '11 at 10:28
1  
@There is nothing we can do: I can prove that you don't need const or mutable, or lambdas in the language, among other features. The question is not whether it is strictly necessary (heck, there are no features in C++0x that we have not been coding without in the last few years, so they are not needed!), the actual question is whether the features make the development better, safer, faster or easier. It is not that I did not understand your question, but rather that you failed to understand my answer, not having the trailing return type would make code more awkward and error prone. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 5 '11 at 10:34
    
Would you really prefer not to have that feature? Don't use it, it is as simple as that. But for me, and the committee, it seems like a nice little thing to have. In the same way that it is nice to have type deduction in function template arguments instead of forcing you to provide the type (another feature that was discussed when added to the language, and some felt it was not needed), it is nice that the compiler can do it's magic and help me in solving my real problem. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 5 '11 at 10:38
2  
[...] for which the authors of the proposal suggest uses of typeof as a way of resolving the unknown type. Because of the burden that it can impose in complex expressions, they propose the addition of a keyword auto such that auto var = expr; would be similar to typeof( expr ) var = expr; but not the same, for some issues that are mentioned later in the document. Feel free to read the document, as it also adds quite some insight into the discussion we have already had for trailing return types. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 6 '11 at 11:15
1  
Note that there is a difference between Bjarne suggestion to revisit auto and the actual proposals that lead into the current state of the language. The motivation to actually add auto stem not only from Bjarne's point of view but rather from the motivations stated in the different proposals that were discussed. The C++ committee is not ruled by Bjarne, and a proposal with only his motivation example might have been rejected (I don't actually think it would, but it could). Please don't cry on this :P –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 6 '11 at 11:18

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