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I'm using a query which generally executes in under a second, but sometimes takes between 10-40 seconds to finish. I'm actually not totally clear on how the subquery works, I just know that it works, in that it gives me 15 rows for each faverprofileid.

I'm logging slow queries and it's telling me 5823244 rows were examined, which is odd because there aren't anywhere close to that many rows in any of the tables involved (the favorites table has the most at 50,000 rows).

Can anyone offer me some pointers? Is it an issue with the subquery and needing to use filesort?

EDIT: Running explain shows that the users table is not using an index (even though id is the primary key). Under extra it says: Using temporary; Using filesort.

SELECT F.id,F.created,U.username,U.fullname,U.id,I.*   
FROM favorites AS F  
INNER JOIN users AS U ON F.faver_profile_id = U.id  
INNER JOIN items AS I ON F.notice_id = I.id  
WHERE faver_profile_id IN (360,379,95,315,278,1)  
AND F.removed = 0  
AND I.removed = 0   
AND F.collection_id is null   
AND I.nudity = 0  
AND (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM favorites WHERE faver_profile_id = F.faver_profile_id  
AND created > F.created AND removed = 0 AND collection_id is null) < 15 
ORDER BY F.faver_profile_id, F.created DESC;
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You could get better syntax coloring if you write the "select", "from", "where", "and", "in" and "order by" keywords in small letters, and "inner", "join", "on" and "desc" with only a first capital letter. –  Hosam Aly Feb 26 '09 at 8:55
    
Are you trying to select first 15 items for each faver_profile_id ordered by created? –  Quassnoi Feb 26 '09 at 9:01
    
Have you run ANALYZE on the tables? –  vladr Feb 26 '09 at 15:31
    
The users table wasn't using an index and favorites was using the "removed" index instead of faver_profile_id. For some reason deleting the "removed" index (which I don't really need) fixed both these issues. I've also switched to GROUP BY and HAVING and the query now runs very fast. Thanks! –  makeee Feb 26 '09 at 23:04
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think with GROUP BY and HAVING it should be faster. Is that what you want?

SELECT F.id,F.created,U.username,U.fullname,U.id, I.field1, I.field2, count(*) as CNT
FROM favorites AS F  
INNER JOIN users AS U ON F.faver_profile_id = U.id  
INNER JOIN items AS I ON F.notice_id = I.id  
WHERE faver_profile_id IN (360,379,95,315,278,1)  
AND F.removed = 0  
AND I.removed = 0   
AND F.collection_id is null   
AND I.nudity = 0  
GROUP BY F.id,F.created,U.username,U.fullname,U.id,I.field1, I.field2
HAVING CNT < 15
ORDER BY F.faver_profile_id, F.created DESC;

Don't know which fields from items you need, so I've put placeholders.

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using group by and having is what popped into my head first when i read his problem... –  GordonB Feb 26 '09 at 8:40
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I suggest you use Mysql Explain Query to see how your mysql server handles the query. My bet is your indexes aren't optimal, but explain should do much better than my bet.

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Yeah, running explain shows that the users table is not using an index (even though id is the primary key). Under extra it says: Using temporary; Using filesort. Not sure why it wouldn't use the index.. –  makeee Feb 26 '09 at 8:40
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The number of rows examined represents is large because many rows have been examined more than once. You are getting this because of an incorrectly optimized query plan which results in table scans when index lookups should have been performed. In this case the number of rows examined is exponential, i.e. of an order of magnitude comparable to the product of the total number of rows in more than one table.

  • Make sure that you have run ANALYZE TABLE on your three tables.
  • Read on how to avoid table scans, and identify then create any missing indexes
  • Rerun ANALYZE and re-explain your queries
    • the number of examined rows must drop dramatically
    • if not, post the full explain plan
  • use query hints to force the use of indices (to see the index names for a table, use SHOW INDEX):

SELECT F.id,F.created,U.username,U.fullname,U.id,I.*
FROM favorites AS F FORCE INDEX (faver_profile_id_key)
INNER JOIN users AS U FORCE INDEX FOR JOIN (PRIMARY) ON F.faver_profile_id = U.id
INNER JOIN items AS I FORCE INDEX FOR JOIN (PRIMARY) ON F.notice_id = I.id
WHERE faver_profile_id IN (360,379,95,315,278,1)
AND F.removed = 0
AND I.removed = 0
AND F.collection_id is null
AND I.nudity = 0
AND (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM favorites FORCE INDEX (faver_profile_id_key) WHERE faver_profile_id = F.faver_profile_id
AND created > F.created AND removed = 0 AND collection_id is null) < 15
ORDER BY F.faver_profile_id, F.created DESC;

You may also change your query to use GROUP BY faver_profile_id/HAVING count > 15 instead of the nested SELECT COUNT(*) subquery, as suggested by vartec. The performance of both your original and vartec's query should be comparable if both are properly optimized e.g. using hints (your query would use nested index lookups, whereas vartec's query would use a hash-based strategy.)

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You could do a loop on each id and use limit instead of the count(*) subquery:

foreach $id in [123,456,789]:
    SELECT
     F.id,
     F.created,
     U.username,
     U.fullname,
     U.id,
     I.*
    FROM
     favorites AS F INNER JOIN
     users AS U ON F.faver_profile_id = U.id INNER JOIN
     items AS I ON F.notice_id = I.id
    WHERE
     F.faver_profile_id = {$id} AND
     I.removed = 0 AND
     I.nudity = 0 AND
     F.removed = 0 AND
     F.collection_id is null
    ORDER BY
     F.faver_profile_id,
     F.created DESC
    LIMIT
     15;
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I'll suppose the result of that query is intented to be shown as a paged list. In that case, perhaps you could consider to do a simpler "unjoined query" and do a second query for each row to read only the 15, 20 or 30 elements shown. Was not a JOIN a heavy operation? This would simplify the query and It wouldn't become slower when the joined tables grow.

Tell me if I'm wrong, please.

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