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What I want to do is exactly the same like in this article

http://css-tricks.com/css3-multiple-backgrounds-obsoletes-sliding-doors/

But in my case the left and right image is transparent. so repeated background is repeating in whole element. Is there any way to give right and left space?

HTML

<ul>
    <li class="expanding">Went To The Market</li>
</ul>

CSS

li.expanding {
    background: url('left.jpg') top left no-repeat,
        url('right.jpg') top right no-repeat,
        url('middle.jpg') top center repeat-x;
    height: 40px;
    padding-top: 12px;
    padding-left: 12px;
    padding-right: 20px;
    float: left;
}

See live example here: http://css-tricks.com/examples/CSS3-Expanding-Menu/

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1  
show some code mate. The HTML as well as the CSS. Better to use jsfiddle –  Jawad May 5 '11 at 13:18
    
One of these properties can possibly help you: w3.org/TR/css3-background/#backgrounds - but I don't really understand your problem at the moment. Maybe if you showed a broken test case (jsFiddle) I could figure it out. –  thirtydot May 6 '11 at 10:02
    
I have same problem, how did you solve it ? –  Muflix Oct 12 '13 at 17:23
    
You can center the image and set right and left padding. –  user3061252 Dec 3 '13 at 11:40

2 Answers 2

Take a look at this:

<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">
li {
    background: url(http://www.w3schools.com/images/w3css.gif) repeat-x;
    padding:0px 20px;
    outline:1px solid red;
    background-clip:content-box;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<ul>
        <li>Went To The Market</li>
</ul>
</body>
</html>

If you don't want use padding, you could also use an left-right border with rgba(0,0,0,0).

To understand how it work, visit: http://www.css3.info/preview/background-origin-and-background-clip/

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With multiple backgrounds, the backgrounds are layered, so technically, each background takes up the whole element as dictated by the repeat value. If you have transparent parts in one of your backgrounds, then backgrounds under it will show through.

Depending on the look you're going for, if you're using CSS3 techniques anyway, why not play around with things like border-radius? Other than that, I suggest giving us an image of what you're trying to accomplish, and give us a jsfiddle, or live demo, of what's actually happening.

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