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can anybody help me with an equation for this curve?

http://temp.electrobeat.dk/eq.gif

I need to make an equation for an acceleration..
x = time
y = velocity (pixel)

constants:
t = time in ms when to recalculate the equation
m = max speed in pixels (y)
a = acceleration (how fast the curve rises)

EDIT:

I have found an equation here which works, but I can't figure out what each parameter is for?

Tween.regularEaseOut = function(t,b,c,d){
    return -c *(t/=d)*(t-2) + b;
    }
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wolframalpha.com –  Andreas Rejbrand May 5 '11 at 11:10
    
This is inconsistent - is "y" representing "position", or "velocity"? –  Alnitak May 5 '11 at 11:24
    
velocity :) ... –  clarkk May 5 '11 at 11:25
    
edit again :) ... –  clarkk May 5 '11 at 11:37
1  
To match the original curve, just try y = m * (1 - exp(-t * n)). Choice of n (which will be proportional to a) is left as an exercise for the reader. –  Alnitak May 5 '11 at 13:43

2 Answers 2

It looks very much like a standard 1/CR style capacitor charging curve from electronics, which from memory has an equation of:

 (1 - e^(-t/RC))

The factor "RC" (resistance * capacitance) controls how quickly the slope approaches the asymptote.

See e.g. http://jcsu.jesus.cam.ac.uk/~rpc25/notes/physics/capacitors/index.html

The shape of the curve comes from the fact that the rate of charge (i.e. the first derivative) is proportional to the difference between the current value and the target value.

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yes, it could look like a 4-pole highpass filter.. if you know anything about music –  clarkk May 5 '11 at 10:39
    
@clarkk - I do, and it's not the right shape for a filter transfer curve. –  Alnitak May 5 '11 at 10:47
    
no, but it looks like.. but can you explain more specifik how to understand the equation? to me it's just #!& :) –  clarkk May 5 '11 at 10:50
    
I need it to make a acceleration equation.. –  clarkk May 5 '11 at 10:51
    
please add more detail to your question. –  Alnitak May 5 '11 at 11:06
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I got it :)

<div id="tst" style="position:absolute; top:200px; left:200px; height:100px; width:100px; background:#ff0000"></div>

<script type="text/javascript">
    function Tween(){
        this.time = 0;
        this.begin = 200;
        this.change = 1000;
        this.duration = 800

        this.regularEaseInOut = function(t,b,c,d){
            if((t/=d/2) < 1){
                return c/2*t*t + b;
            }
            else{
                return -c/2 * ((--t)*(t-2) - 1) + b;
            }
        };
    }
    var Tween = new Tween();

    var int = 10;
    var loop = setInterval(function(){
        Tween.time += int;
        if(Tween.time >= Tween.duration){
            clearInterval(loop);
        }
        else{
            document.getElementById('tst').style.left = Tween.regularEaseInOut(Tween.time, Tween.begin, Tween.change, Tween.duration)+'px';
        }
    }, int);
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
I'd like to see a plot of that function to see whether it's remotely like the one you asked for. –  Alnitak May 10 '11 at 17:56

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