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I know how to do this the long way (create a byte array of the necessary size, then used a for loop and casting every element from the int array), but was wondering if there was a faster way. seems the way above would break if the int was bigger than an sbyte.

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byte array and "bigger than short" mismatch. –  Henk Holterman May 5 '11 at 12:15
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A tiny bit of code would have eliminated so much guessing. –  Henk Holterman May 5 '11 at 12:16
    
I meant that int is not one to one with a byte in terms of size. –  soandos May 5 '11 at 12:30
    
And short/ushort are not one to one with byte. –  Henk Holterman May 5 '11 at 12:32
    
my bad, meant sbyte –  soandos May 5 '11 at 12:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 36 down vote accepted

If you want a bitwise copy, i.e. get 4 bytes out of one int, then use Buffer.BlockCopy:

byte[] result = new byte[intArray.Length * sizeof(int)];
Buffer.BlockCopy(intArray, 0, result, 0, result.Length);

Don't use Array.Copy, because it will try to convert and not just copy. See the remarks on the MSDN page for more info.

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how does it know to get 4 bytes per int? –  soandos May 5 '11 at 12:32
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It just copies the memory. It doesn't know about int or byte. The memory representation of result will be exactly the same as that of intArray. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 5 '11 at 12:35
    
How would you do the reverse? Take a byte[] and copy it to a int[]? –  Moop Nov 15 '13 at 16:46
    
@Moop int[] result = new int[byteArray.Length / sizeof(int)]; Buffer.BlockCopy(byteArray, 0, result, 0, result.Length); –  Daniel Hilgarth Nov 17 '13 at 12:19
int[] ints = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 };
byte[] bytes = ints.Select(x => (byte)x).ToArray();
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-1: This is just plain wrong: (1) You are missing ToArray(), so it won't even compile. (2) After you fixed that, you will get an exception, because Cast is only unboxing the value. More info: stackoverflow.com/questions/445471/… –  Daniel Hilgarth May 5 '11 at 13:31
    
@Daniel: Woops, coded that up without testing it. Thanks for pointing that out. –  Charlie Somerville May 6 '11 at 10:21
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new[] {1, 2, 3}.Select(n => (byte)n).ToArray() works –  JackNova Dec 24 '12 at 17:07
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and what happens if you have { 1,2,3,4,5,6,257 } as your input... –  gbjbaanb Aug 21 '13 at 12:54

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