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I'm struggling a bit to understand why this code snippet does not compile.

#include <cstdio>

class A {
public:
    virtual int potential()=0;
    virtual int potential(int arg, int arg2)=0;
};

class B : public A {
public:
    int potential() { return 1; }
    virtual int potential(int arg, int arg2) { return 2; }
};

class C : public B {
public:
    int potential(int arg, int arg2) { return 3; }
};


int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    C c;
    int value = c.potential();
    printf("Got %i\n", value);
    return 0;
}

I have two pure virtual methods, both named potential in the abstract superclass A. The subclass B then defines both, but a further subclass C only needs to redefine one of the methods.

However, on compilation, only the method defined in C is recognized, and potential() isn't seen (this should have been inherited from B):

In function 'int main(int, char**)':
Line 23: error: no matching function for call to 'C::potential()'
compilation terminated due to -Wfatal-errors.

If I rename A::potential(int, int) to something else all the way down the inheritance tree, such as A::somethingElse(int, int), then the code compiles fine, and the output is Got 1, as expected.

This has been verified using clang, g++ and MSVC's cl.

Any ideas on what is going on?

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3  
Use cstdio in C++ plzkthx. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 5 '11 at 11:27
    
Using <cstdio> as suggested. –  Dan May 5 '11 at 11:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 26 down vote accepted

However, on compilation, only the method defined in C is recognized, and potential() isn't seen (this should have been inherited from B).

C++ doesn’t work like this: because you implemented a different potential method (a method of the same name but with different parameters) in C, the other method is hidden as far as C is concerned.

Hiding happens because of the way that C++ resolves (overloaded) method names: when you call a method potential on an instance of a class (here c), C++ searches in the class whether a method of that name exists. If that isn’t the case it continues its search in the base classes. It goes further up in the hierarchy until at least one method of that name is found.

But in your case, C++ doesn’t have to search far: the method already exists in C, so it stops its search. Now C++ tries to match the method signature. Unfortunately, the method signature doesn’t match but at this time it’s too late: overload resolution fails; C++ doesn’t search for other methods that might match.

There are three solutions:

  1. Import it with using in C:

    class C : public B {
    public:
        using B::potential;
        int potential(int arg, int arg2) { return 3; }
    };
    
  2. Call the method from a base class instance in main:

    C c;
    B& b = c;
    int value = b.potential();
    
  3. Qualify the name explicitly in main:

    C c;
    int value = c.B::potential();
    
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting - I haven't seen the using keyword used like this, before. How come the other method is hidden? It has a different signature than the defined method, right? –  Dan May 5 '11 at 11:30
    
@Dan: That's just the way inheritance is in C++. Call it a quirk if you like. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 5 '11 at 11:31
    
@Dan I’ve added an explanation of overload resolution and hiding. –  Konrad Rudolph May 5 '11 at 11:34
2  
@Konrad: And it's a very good one. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 5 '11 at 11:36
1  
+1 Great answer, good to know how C++ performs its search. –  Kevin May 5 '11 at 11:39

The problem is name hiding.

Function overloads and function inheritance aren't best friends. Usually you either [hmm, what's "either" for three?]:

  • Overload a function within a single class. Everything works fine.
  • Inherit a non-overloaded function from a base class. Everything works fine.
  • Re-implement a non-overloaded function from a base class B in a derived class C. C::func hides B::func because it has the same name.

You're using inheritance and overloading, and your C::func is hiding B::func and every overload of it, even the ones that aren't re-implemented in C.

It's a bit of a quirky confusion of C++, but it's easily resolved.

In short, the solution is to bring B::potential() into scope for C with the using statement:

class C : public B {
public:
    using B::potential; // brings overloads from B into scope
    int potential(int arg, int arg2) { return 3; }
};

I have written an article here that demonstrates the issue in depth.

share|improve this answer
1  
You can use either for three options, also :) –  Dan May 5 '11 at 11:40
    
I accepted Konrad's as it was first to be posted... –  Dan May 5 '11 at 11:47
1  
@Dan: That's not really how it works, but you'll get no moaning from me! Whether you got your answer is what counts. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 5 '11 at 11:55
    
thefreedictionary.com/either ;) –  davka May 5 '11 at 13:24
    
@davka: I don't recognise "American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language" as an authority on English. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 5 '11 at 14:02

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