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How to use standard template library std::sort() to sort an array declared as int v[2000];

Does C++ provide some function that can get the begin and end index of an array?

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2  
why I can just ask 6 questions in 24 hours? two days before I can ask 24 questions in 24 hours – user707549 May 5 '11 at 12:26
30  
Didn't realise there was a limit, but that seems pretty reasonable to me. If one person is asking so many questions, maybe they would be better served by reading some reference material. – j_random_hacker May 5 '11 at 13:01
up vote 62 down vote accepted

In C++0x/11 we get std::begin and std::end which are overloaded for arrays:

#include <algorithm>

int main(){
  int v[2000];
  std::sort(std::begin(v), std::end(v));
}

If you don't have access to C++0x, it isn't hard to write them yourself:

// for container with nested typedefs, non-const version
template<class Cont>
typename Cont::iterator begin(Cont& c){
  return c.begin();
}

template<class Cont>
typename Cont::iterator end(Cont& c){
  return c.end();
}

// const version
template<class Cont>
typename Cont::const_iterator begin(Cont const& c){
  return c.begin();
}

template<class Cont>
typename Cont::const_iterator end(Cont const& c){
  return c.end();
}

// overloads for C style arrays
template<class T, std::size_t N>
T* begin(T (&arr)[N]){
  return &arr[0];
}

template<class T, std::size_t N>
T* end(T (&arr)[N]){
  return arr + N;
}
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8  
Are std::begin() and std::end() C++1x additions? They're very nice -- should have been this way from the outset, it would have made a lot of algorithms more generic! – j_random_hacker May 5 '11 at 12:08
8  
std::begin() and std::end() aren't a part of the current C++ Standard, but you can use boost::begin() and boost::end(). – Kirill V. Lyadvinsky May 5 '11 at 12:12
1  
Edited accordingly to the comments. – Xeo May 5 '11 at 12:24
2  
Just a reminder: long before they were to proposed for C++11, most of us had such a begin and end function in our personal tool kits. Before C++11, however, they had a serios disadvantage: they didn't result in an integral constant expression. So depending on the specific needs, we'd use them, or a macro which did the division of the two sizeof. – James Kanze May 5 '11 at 12:56
1  
@Xeo I'm not sure I understand what you're saying. decltype certainly simplifies certain uses, but I don't see what it has to do with the free begin and end functions. (And you really should have two each of them, one for C style arrays, and another for containers, with automatic discrimination, so you can use them in templates, without knowing whether the type is a container or a C style array.) – James Kanze May 5 '11 at 13:27
#include <algorithm>
static const size_t v_size = 2000;
int v[v_size];
// Fill the array by values
std::sort(v,v+v_size); 

In C++11:

#include <algorithm>
#include <array>
std::array<int, 2000> v;
// Fill the array by values
std::sort(v.begin(),v.end()); 
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2  
+1: Correct but very brittle. If the sort is not near the declaration this can easily be broken during maintenance. – Loki Astari May 5 '11 at 15:16
1  
@Martin: true. That's why I prefer to use std::vector. My code would be: std::vector<int> v(2000); std::sort( v.begin(), v.end() ); – Naszta May 5 '11 at 15:19
2  
Of course, using literal array sizes is always dangerous, as in the example. But there is nothing wrong with putting the array size into a 'const int'. – Kai Petzke Sep 19 '13 at 18:39
    
True, updated. :) – Naszta Sep 19 '13 at 20:17

If you don't know the size, you can use:

std::sort(v, v + sizeof v / sizeof v[0]);

Even if you do know the size, it's a good idea to code it this way as it will reduce the possibility of a bug if the array size is changed later.

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2  
If it is statically allocated, he should know the size, because the compiler knows. But this is better coding practice. – Benoit May 5 '11 at 12:11
6  
Since you are writting future proof code, instead of using the sizeof x/sizeof *x trick you should use a safer template: template <typename T, int N> int array_size( T (&)[N] ) { return N; }, as that will fail if instead of an array you pass a pointer. It can be converted into a compile time constant if needed, but it becomes a little too hard to read in a comment. – David Rodríguez - dribeas May 5 '11 at 12:16
1  
@David: Good idea, but an even better (and dare I say The Right) way is to define begin() and end() function templates that are specialised for all common container types, including arrays, and use them instead. Xeo's answer made me think these had already been added to C++, now it seems they haven't... I'll see what else people have to say and then update. – j_random_hacker May 5 '11 at 12:21
1  
:) I have a small utility header that has a few bits like this, including begin, end, size, STATIC_SIZE (macro that returns a compile time constant with the size), but to be honest, I hardly ever use that outside of small code samples. – David Rodríguez - dribeas May 5 '11 at 14:39
1  
The size of an array can be received by std::extent<decltype(v)>::value in C++11 – xis Jul 29 '13 at 20:36

You can sort it std::sort(v, v + 2000)

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3  
+1: Correct but very brittle. If the sort is not near the declaration this can easily be broken during maintenance. – Loki Astari May 5 '11 at 15:16
//It is working
#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
void main()
{
    int a[5];
    int temp=0;
    cout<<"Enter Values"<<endl;
    for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
    {
        cin>>a[i];
    }
    for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
    {
        for(int j=0;j<5;j++)
        {
            if(a[i]>a[j])
            {
                temp=a[i];
                a[i]=a[j];
                a[j]=temp;
            }
        }
    }
    cout<<"Asending Series"<<endl;
    for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
    {
        cout<<endl;
        cout<<a[i]<<endl;
    }


    for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
    {
        for(int j=0;j<5;j++)
        {
            if(a[i]<a[j])
            {
                temp=a[i];
                a[i]=a[j];
                a[j]=temp;
            }
        }
    }
    cout<<"Desnding Series"<<endl;
    for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
    {
        cout<<endl;
        cout<<a[i]<<endl;
    }


}
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you can use,

 std::sort(v.begin(),v.end());
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Hi, this question already seems to have a an broadly accepted answer. Can you explain how this is different? – Stefan Feb 2 at 9:06

sorting method without std::sort:

// sorting myArray ascending
int iTemp = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < ARRAYSIZE; i++)
{
    for (int j = i + 1; j <= ARRAYSIZE; j++)
    {
        // for descending sort change '<' with '>'
        if (myArray[j] < myArray[i])
        {
            iTemp = myArray[i];
            myArray[i] = myArray[j];
            myArray[j] = iTemp;
        }
    }
}

Run complete example:

#include <iostream> // std::cout, std::endl /* http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/header/iostream */
#include <cstdlib>  // srand(), rand()      /* http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/header/cstdlib */
#include <ctime>    // time()               /* http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/header/ctime */


int main()
{
    const int ARRAYSIZE = 10;
    int myArray[ARRAYSIZE];

    // populate myArray with random numbers from 1 to 1000
    srand(time(0));
    for (int i = 0; i < ARRAYSIZE; i++)
    {
        myArray[i] = rand()% 1000 + 1;
    }

    // print unsorted myArray
    std::cout << "unsorted myArray: " << std::endl;
    for (int i = 0; i < ARRAYSIZE; i++)
    {
        std::cout << "[" << i << "] -> " << myArray[i] << std::endl;
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;

    // sorting myArray ascending
    int iTemp = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < ARRAYSIZE; i++)
    {
        for (int j = i + 1; j <= ARRAYSIZE; j++)
        {
            // for descending sort change '<' with '>'
            if (myArray[j] < myArray[i])
            {
                iTemp = myArray[i];
                myArray[i] = myArray[j];
                myArray[j] = iTemp;
            }
        }
    }

    // print sorted myArray
    std::cout << "sorted myArray: " << std::endl;
    for (int i = 0; i < ARRAYSIZE; i++)
    {
        std::cout << "[" << i << "] -> " << myArray[i] << std::endl;
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
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