Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using grails since a couple of month now and I think it's definitely the way web dev should be on java side. But there are 2 things That I'm concern for future project and I would like to know your thought about it and how you avoid this.

First, plugin are great, but there's one thing that I did'nt like or understand is how to handle dependencies properly. I mean, I can end in my project with a bunch of plugin and 2 or 3 of them use same jar with different version and it is a pain to find out witch one is causing the problem. Is there a simple way to avoid these kind of issue?

Second, groovy is nice, but I think it's easy to mismatch syntax. You can put a line with ";" at the end and write some java mix with groovy. Is there some tool to enforce groovy syntax since there still not that much of people using groovy outside in comparison to java dev?

thank!

share|improve this question
    
You should make your titles more subjective for people searching for the same questions. –  John Riselvato Aug 20 '12 at 15:08
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I can end in my project with a bunch of plugin and 2 or 3 of them use same jar with different version and it is a pain to find out witch one is causing the problem. Is there a simple way to avoid these kind of issue?

A fairly recent version of Grails introduced a dependency resolution DSL that should resolve these kinds of problems for you. If you're currently copying your JARs into the lib folder and specifying your plugin dependencies in application.properties then you're bypassing Grails' dependency resolution (which is based on Ivy). To use the Grails' dependency resolution, you should specify your dependencies in BuildConfig.groovy and remove any JARs in your lib folder.

share|improve this answer
add comment

For the second one.

Groovy is mostly a Java superset, so just removing ; will not make program much "groovier". Sometimes one has to work hard to reduce Java code into a 3 times smaller Groovy code.

I mean to illustrate that it's rarely a matter of automated analysis.

IntelliJ IDEA, though, does a very good job at finding unnecessary code. CodeNarc also looks OK.

Hm, probably I'm duplicating Groovy code analysis tool.

share|improve this answer
add comment

For number one, I've found the best way to use plugins in Grails was to not use them. Or rather, use those that are well-maintained (ie: Shiro, MailService) or created by either big groups (Apache) or Grails committers.

For other plugins, we used to download the plugin, open it up, and look at the source, and then just bring in the things we needed. Most plugins do a lot of extra things that are unnecessary because they need to support configurability. You can take the pieces you need and simply add them in. The benefit to this is you'll end up learning the internals of Grails as well.

For number two, Victor's right. Groovy is for the most part a superset of Java. Writing Groovy-ish code involves things like using closures, understanding the benefits of dynamic typing, and fulling loading objects via its special constructors. That's just a preliminary level, Groovy does so much more that you'll learn over time.

I wouldn't worry so much about trying to enforce Groovy syntax. Just write what you know, and learn the Groovy ways of doing things. The extension of the file should identify to a developer that it's not straight Java code. If you use closures, that too will identify it pretty quickly.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.