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I am trying to handle an exception caused by this following code:

begin
  reader = CSV.open(ARGV[0],col_sep=";") 
rescue
  puts "exception: " + $!
  exit
end

Unfortunately I cannot display correctly the message, Ruby does not interpret $! as string and neither seems to be able to convert it correctly:

$ ruby.exe fixcsv.rb csvfile
fixcsv.rb:11:in `+': can't convert ArgumentError into String (TypeError)
        from fixcsv.rb:11:in `rescue in <main>'
        from fixcsv.rb:8:in `<main>'

I really cannot understand why this happens; the following tutorial displays similar code that obviously takes into account a correct string conversion of $!: http://ruby.activeventure.com/programmingruby/book/tut_exceptions.html

Has this anything to do with the fact that I did not explicitly set the exception class?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

While I would recommend doing what fl00r did (Exception => e), you can still use $! if you really want to:

begin
  reader = CSV.open(ARGV[0],col_sep=";") 
rescue
  puts "exception: " + $!.message
  exit
end
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This is unvirtuous, in that you're not being lazy enough. –  Andrew Grimm May 5 '11 at 23:34
begin
  reader = CSV.open(ARGV[0],col_sep=";") 
rescue Exception => e  
  puts "exception: #{e.message}"
end
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You don't need to do .message in your answer. –  Andrew Grimm May 5 '11 at 23:33

You don't even need to add .message to e, from @fl00r's example:

begin
  reader = CSV.open(ARGV[0],col_sep=";") 
rescue Exception => e  
  puts "exception: #{e}"
end

What happens is that Ruby calls .to_s on the exception e. Exceptions implement to_s, they merely don't implement to_str, which is what "exception: " + $! tried to do.

The difference between to_s and to_str is that the former means "You can change me into a string, but I'm not like a string at all", whereas the latter means "Not only can you change me into a string, but I'm very much like a string". Jorg W Mittag's discussion on to_s versus to_str is well worth reading.

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