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I'm aware that GPUs generally have high memory access times. However, performance isn't greatly hampered as the access time is 'hidden' by executing other instructions whilst waiting for the memory access.

I was just wondering, if you have a wavefront with 64 work items, and 16 processor cores, each processor core will have 64/16 = 4 work items. Also, all the cores must execute all the work-items in parallel.

So if the work-item requires a memory access, what happens? Surely as all the instructions are the same, you would have 16 memory accesses to compute (or just 1?). Is it then the case that another one of the 4 work-items on each core is then substituted in to begin execution? Does this mean all 16 processor cores are now executing the same new work-item.

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2 Answers 2

You question is rather AMD centric, and that is an architecture I am less fluent in, but the NVIDIA architecture uses a memory controller design which can fuse DRAM access requests into a single transaction ("memory coalescing" in NVIDIA speak).

The basic idea is that the memory controller will fuse requests that lie within a smallish address range I to a single load or store to service every thread in the SIMD group executing the load. The most recent hardware supports 32,64,128 and 256 byte transaction sizes, and the memory controller also is smart enough to add additional single word sized ansaction onto a large transaction in cases where the memory region accessed doesn't align to a transaction sized boundary.

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Your question is rather hard to answer because you mix things. There are theoretical (abstract) entities such as work-items and wavefronts(as far as I'm aware "Wavefront" = "Warp" in NVIDIA's terminology) and the physical ones such as processors and multiprocessors(nvidia).

The theoretical abstractions are invented to make your programs independent of underlying hardware configuration. So that you wouldn't bother computing indexes of a processor that will do the job for a 16-processor GPU and then do new computations for 32-processor GPUs, you just think in terms of wavefronts(warps), which have constant sizes.

Let's get back to your question:

"I'm aware that GPUs generally have high memory access times. However, performance isn't greatly hampered as the access time is 'hidden' by executing other instructions whilst waiting for the memory access."

Example (it is not technically correct, but serves as an illustration):

Suppose we are doing 100 arithmetical instructions and then encounter memory request. At physical level instruction execution done by the warp/wavefront is done in several hardware cycles. Here's how memory operation is issued:

Requested address   : a, b, c, d, -, -, -, -, -, -,  -,  -,  -,  -,  -,  -
Abstract WorkItems  : 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15
SIMD Hardware cores : 0, 1, 2, 3, -, -, -, -, -, -,  -,  -,  -,  -,  -,  -

NVIDIA's warp takes 4 cycles to compute:

Requested address   : a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, -, -,  -,  -,  -,  -,  -,  -
Abstract WorkItems  : 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15
SIMD Hardware cores : *, *, *, *, 0, 1, 2, 3, -, -,  -,  -,  -,  -,  -,  -

Lets skip the 3-rd cycle.

Requested address   : a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j,  k,  l,  m,  n,  o,  p
Abstract WorkItems  : 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15
SIMD Hardware cores : *, *, *, *, *, *, *, *, *, *,  *,  *,  0,  1,  2,  3

During these 4 cycles memory requests are accumulated.

Depending on what addresses are requested and how smart the hardware is these requests are served coalesced according to hardware specs. Suppose a..p are ordered sequentially within range 0xFFF0..0xFFFF then all of the requests will be served in one coalesced memory operation. If hardware encounters addresses that it doesn't like(according to specs) it will brake down memory access in to several memory operations.

Since current warp requested memory operation, it suspends and hardware switches physical processor to the next warp. New warp starts by doing its 100 instructions the same as this was done by the previos warp/wavefront. After encountering and issuing memory operation the second warp/wavefront also suspends. At this point depending on your work-group-size and other parameters the hardware may resume the previous warp or continue with the next ones.

The amount of warps is constant during kernel execution and is computed on host before execution starts, this means if you don't have these 100 useful instructions prior memory request, you will end up having all of your warps in a suspended state which will lead to hardware suspension and performance loss.

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