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I want a simple class that implements a fixed-size circular buffer. It should be efficient, easy on the eyes, generically typed.

EDIT: It need not be MT-capable, for now. I can always add a lock later, it won't be high-concurrency in any case.

Methods should be: .Add and I guess .List, where I retrieve all the entries. On second thought, Retrieval I think should be done via an indexer. At any moment I will want to be able to retrieve any element in the buffer by index. But keep in mind that from one moment to the next Element[n] may be different, as the Circular buffer fills up and rolls over.

This isn't a stack, it's a circular buffer. Regarding "overflow": I would expect internally there would be an array holding the items, and over time the head and tail of the buffer will rotate around that fixed array. But that should be invisible from the user. There should be no externally-detectable "overflow" event or behavior.

This is not a school assignment - it is most commonly going to be used for a MRU cache or a fixed-size transaction or event log.

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Should it be thread-safe? What operations are required, just enqueue and dequeue? Or do you also want: current length, random access reads, clear? Should overflow and underflow result in exceptions or should they use a "bool TryDequeue(out T item)" pattern? –  Weeble Feb 26 '09 at 11:29
1  
Example on Codeplex: circularbuffer.codeplex.com –  Nathan Ernst May 10 '10 at 19:20
    
see this answer here: stackoverflow.com/a/7266175/288875 (although org.apache.commons.collections.buffer.CircularFifoBuffer seems unfortunately not to use generics) –  Andre Holzner Apr 4 '12 at 8:34
1  
there seems now to be a version derived from the original Commons Collections which makes use of generics: sourceforge.net/projects/collections (it looks like the project was moved to github) –  Andre Holzner Apr 4 '12 at 8:46
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12 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I would use an array of T, a head and tail pointer, and add and get methods.

Like: (Bug hunting is left to the user)

// Hijack these for simplicity
import java.nio.BufferOverflowException;
import java.nio.BufferUnderflowException;

public class CircularBuffer<T> {

  private T[] buffer;

  private int tail;

  private int head;

  @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
  public CircularBuffer(int n) {
    buffer = (T[]) new Object[n];
    tail = 0;
    head = 0;
  }

  public void add(T toAdd) {
    if (head != (tail - 1)) {
        buffer[head++] = toAdd;
    } else {
        throw new BufferOverflowException();
    }
    head = head % buffer.length;
  }

  public T get() {
    T t = null;
    int adjTail = tail > head ? tail - buffer.length : tail;
    if (adjTail < head) {
        t = (T) buffer[tail++];
        tail = tail % buffer.length;
    } else {
        throw new BufferUnderflowException();
    }
    return t;
  }

  public String toString() {
    return "CircularBuffer(size=" + buffer.length + ", head=" + head + ", tail=" + tail + ")";
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    CircularBuffer<String> b = new CircularBuffer<String>(3);
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        System.out.println("Start: " + b);
        b.add("One");
        System.out.println("One: " + b);
        b.add("Two");
        System.out.println("Two: " + b);
        System.out.println("Got '" + b.get() + "', now " + b);

        b.add("Three");
        System.out.println("Three: " + b);
        // Test Overflow
        // b.add("Four");
        // System.out.println("Four: " + b);

        System.out.println("Got '" + b.get() + "', now " + b);
        System.out.println("Got '" + b.get() + "', now " + b);
        // Test Underflow
        // System.out.println("Got '" + b.get() + "', now " + b);

        // Back to start, let's shift on one
        b.add("Foo");
        b.get();
    }
  }
}
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1  
One bug found: The get() method does not set the elements of the internal array to null after the elements are removed from it, so there is a slight memory leak. –  Esko Luontola Feb 27 '09 at 0:21
1  
Yes, correct. :) I should have noticed that - my fault for not printing the elements in the list in the test code. Not as big as the bug of not using a standard API class or that in many use cases the thread-safe producer/consumer queue is more sensible ... –  JeeBee Feb 27 '09 at 0:49
    
Why write "buffer = (T[]) new Object[n];" and not simply "buffer = new T[n];"? The cast in "t = (T) buffer[tail++];" also looks unnecessary to me. Or is this some Java peculiarity that I'm overlooking...? –  Thomas Feb 27 '09 at 2:24
5  
Unless I am severely misunderstanding the spec, this code has significant flaws. It is possible to insert an infinite number of elements into the queue without getting BufferOverflowException if you do not attempt to retrieve an element. There is a much better implementation at cs.utsa.edu/~wagner/CS2213/queue/queue.html. –  user98166 Jul 9 '09 at 13:55
11  
I'm sure that someone who spent more than 5 minutes writing an answer on a web forum (where I say "bug hunting left to the user") will have a better implementation. –  JeeBee Jul 9 '09 at 17:45
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Check out http://www.cs.utsa.edu/~wagner/CS2213/queue/queue.html for a solid implementation that just needs to be genericized.

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nice! useful. Thanks. –  Cheeso Jul 9 '09 at 14:46
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I would use ArrayBlockingQueue or one of the other prebuilt Queue implementations, depending on what the needs are. Very rarely there is need to implement such a data structure yourself (unless it's a school assignment).

EDIT: Now that you have added the requirement "to retrieve any element in the buffer by index", I suppose that you need to implement your own class (unless google-collections or some other library provides one). A circular buffer is quite easy to implement, as JeeBee's example shows. You may also look at ArrayBlockingQueue's source code - its code is quite clean, just remove the locking and unneeded methods, and add methods for accessing it by index.

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1  
I thought so too - I thought a fixed-size circ buffer would be in the bag of tools, but for some reason I don't see them in the normal Java base class library or in the .NET base class lib. –  Cheeso Feb 26 '09 at 23:35
    
(This is not a school assignment!) –  Cheeso Feb 26 '09 at 23:37
    
I have need for a fixed-sized queue that implements a persistence mechanism when one of two conditions fire: 1 a periodic timer, to batch all unsaved messages, and a second buffer to hold expired messages that haven't been saved yet. I haven't tried, I'm using a persist-immediate queue at the moment, hoping I don't end up with performance issues when my message traffic scales from zero to 1000s/sec. –  Chris Kaminski Jul 14 '09 at 17:50
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This is how I would (or did) write an efficient circular buffer in Java. It's backed by a simple array. For my particular use case, I needed high concurrent throughput, so I used CAS for allocation of the index. I then created mechanisms for reliable copies including a CAS copy of the entire buffer. I used this in a case which is outlined in greater detail in short article.

import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicLong;
import java.lang.reflect.Array;

/**
 * A circular array buffer with a copy-and-swap cursor.
 *
 * <p>This class provides an list of T objects who's size is <em>unstable</em>.
 * It's intended for capturing data where the frequency of sampling greatly
 * outweighs the frequency of inspection (for instance, monitoring).</p>
 *
 * <p>This object keeps in memory a fixed size buffer which is used for
 * capturing objects.  It copies the objects to a snapshot array which may be
 * worked with.  The size of the snapshot array will vary based on the
 * stability of the array during the copy operation.</p>
 *
 * <p>Adding buffer to the buffer is <em>O(1)</em>, and lockless.  Taking a
 * stable copy of the sample is <em>O(n)</em>.</p>
 */
public class ConcurrentCircularBuffer <T> {
    private final AtomicLong cursor = new AtomicLong();
    private final T[]      buffer;
    private final Class<T> type;

    /**
     * Create a new concurrent circular buffer.
     *
     * @param type The type of the array.  This is captured for the same reason
     * it's required by {@link java.util.List.toArray()}.
     *
     * @param bufferSize The size of the buffer.
     *
     * @throws IllegalArgumentException if the bufferSize is a non-positive
     * value.
     */
    public ConcurrentCircularBuffer (final Class <T> type, 
                                     final int bufferSize) 
    {
        if (bufferSize < 1) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(
                "Buffer size must be a positive value"
                );
        }

        this.type    = type;
        this.buffer = (T[]) new Object [ bufferSize ];
    }

    /**
     * Add a new object to this buffer.
     *
     * <p>Add a new object to the cursor-point of the buffer.</p>
     *
     * @param sample The object to add.
     */
    public void add (T sample) {
        buffer[(int) (cursor.getAndIncrement() % buffer.length)] = sample;
    }

    /**
     * Return a stable snapshot of the buffer.
     *
     * <p>Capture a stable snapshot of the buffer as an array.  The snapshot
     * may not be the same length as the buffer, any objects which were
     * unstable during the copy will be factored out.</p>
     * 
     * @return An array snapshot of the buffer.
     */
    public T[] snapshot () {
        T[] snapshots = (T[]) new Object [ buffer.length ];

        /* Determine the size of the snapshot by the number of affected
         * records.  Trim the size of the snapshot by the number of records
         * which are considered to be unstable during the copy (the amount the
         * cursor may have moved while the copy took place).
         *
         * If the cursor eliminated the sample (if the sample size is so small
         * compared to the rate of mutation that it did a full-wrap during the
         * copy) then just treat the buffer as though the cursor is
         * buffer.length - 1 and it was not changed during copy (this is
         * unlikley, but it should typically provide fairly stable results).
         */
        long before = cursor.get();

        /* If the cursor hasn't yet moved, skip the copying and simply return a
         * zero-length array.
         */
        if (before == 0) {
            return (T[]) Array.newInstance(type, 0);
        }

        System.arraycopy(buffer, 0, snapshots, 0, buffer.length);

        long after          = cursor.get();
        int  size           = buffer.length - (int) (after - before);
        long snapshotCursor = before - 1;

        /* Highly unlikely, but the entire buffer was replaced while we
         * waited...so just return a zero length array, since we can't get a
         * stable snapshot...
         */
        if (size <= 0) {
            return (T[]) Array.newInstance(type, 0);
        }

        long start = snapshotCursor - (size - 1);
        long end   = snapshotCursor;

        if (snapshotCursor < snapshots.length) {
            size   = (int) snapshotCursor + 1;
            start  = 0;
        }

        /* Copy the sample snapshot to a new array the size of our stable
         * snapshot area.
         */
        T[] result = (T[]) Array.newInstance(type, size);

        int startOfCopy = (int) (start % snapshots.length);
        int endOfCopy   = (int) (end   % snapshots.length);

        /* If the buffer space wraps the physical end of the array, use two
         * copies to construct the new array.
         */
        if (startOfCopy > endOfCopy) {
            System.arraycopy(snapshots, startOfCopy,
                             result, 0, 
                             snapshots.length - startOfCopy);
            System.arraycopy(snapshots, 0,
                             result, (snapshots.length - startOfCopy),
                             endOfCopy + 1);
        }
        else {
            /* Otherwise it's a single continuous segment, copy the whole thing
             * into the result.
             */
            System.arraycopy(snapshots, startOfCopy,
                             result, 0, endOfCopy - startOfCopy + 1);
        }

        return (T[]) result;
    }

    /**
     * Get a stable snapshot of the complete buffer.
     *
     * <p>This operation fetches a snapshot of the buffer using the algorithm
     * defined in {@link snapshot()}.  If there was concurrent modification of
     * the buffer during the copy, however, it will retry until a full stable
     * snapshot of the buffer was acquired.</p>
     *
     * <p><em>Note, for very busy buffers on large symmetric multiprocessing
     * machines and supercomputers running data processing intensive
     * applications, this operation has the potential of being fairly
     * expensive.  In practice on commodity hardware, dualcore processors and
     * non-processing intensive systems (such as web services) it very rarely
     * retries.</em></p>
     *
     * @return A full copy of the internal buffer.
     */
    public T[] completeSnapshot () {
        T[] snapshot = snapshot();

        /* Try again until we get a snapshot that's the same size as the
         * buffer...  This is very often a single iteration, but it depends on
         * how busy the system is.
         */
        while (snapshot.length != buffer.length) {
            snapshot = snapshot();
        }

        return snapshot;
    }

    /**
     * The size of this buffer.
     */
    public int size () {
        return buffer.length;
    }
}
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1  
This code will fail spectacularly when your buffer has processed Integer.MAX_VALUE elements, as you will access buffer[] with a negative index –  nos Feb 27 '11 at 3:11
    
@nos — Yes, good catch, albeit any program running that long enough to put that many things through this buffer would be quite impressive, I've gone ahead and converted to a long for the cursor tracking. That should be enough values for all practical purposes... –  Scott S. McCoy Mar 2 '11 at 5:40
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Use Java's ArrayDeque

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"At any moment I will want to be able to retrieve any element in the buffer by index." ArrayDeque only offers getFirst() and getLast() –  tennenrishin Jul 26 '13 at 20:28
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Here is a ready-to-use CircularArrayList implementation for Java which I use in production code. By overriding AbstractList in the Java-recommended way, it supports all functionality you would expect from a standard List implementation in the Java Collections Framework (generic element type, subList, iteration etc.).

The following calls complete in O(1):

  • add(item) - adds at end of list
  • remove(0) - removes from beginning of list
  • get(i) - retrieves random element in list
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Just use someone else's implementation:

The Power Collections Deque<T> is implemented by a circular buffer.

The power collections library is patchy but the Deque is perfectly acceptable expanding circular buffer.

Since you indicate that you do not want expansion and instead desire overwrite you could fairly easily modify the code to overwrite. This would simply involve removing the check for the pointers being logically adjacent and just writing anyway. At the same time the private buffer could be made readonly.

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Expanding? Does that mean it gets larger without me being able to control it? –  Cheeso Feb 26 '09 at 23:31
    
yes, but modifying it to either refuse (Exception) or overwrite the last value is not hard... –  ShuggyCoUk Feb 26 '09 at 23:40
    
Throw an exception every time I add an item in the circbuffer after the first n items? Geez, that sounds like a bad practice. –  Cheeso Feb 27 '09 at 5:33
2  
depends on the semantics, if you don't want the buffer to expand then you have three options: 1) calling code is supposed to check if it is full and not add (so the add should throw). 2) atempts to add simply disappear into nothing 3) data already in the buffer is overwritten. –  ShuggyCoUk Feb 27 '09 at 8:03
    
if you don't want data in the buffer or data wanting to be in the buffer to be lost the only reasonable response is to throw if something screws up which would fore it (or get bigger to cope with more data) –  ShuggyCoUk Feb 27 '09 at 8:04
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System.Collections.Generic.Queue - is simple circular buffer inside (T[] with head and tail, just like in sample from JeeBee).

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Here is an implementation I've coded for my own use but that could be useful.

The buffer contains a maximum fixed set of items. The set is circular, old items are automatically removed. The caller can get items tail by an absolute incremental index (a long), but items may have been lost between calls too distant in time. This class is fully thread-safe.

public sealed class ConcurrentCircularBuffer<T> : ICollection<T>
{
    private T[] _items;
    private int _index;
    private bool _full;

    public ConcurrentCircularBuffer(int capacity)
    {
        if (capacity <= 1) // need at least two items
            throw new ArgumentException(null, "capacity");

        Capacity = capacity;
        _items = new T[capacity];
    }

    public int Capacity { get; private set; }
    public long TotalCount { get; private set; }

    public int Count
    {
        get
        {
            lock (SyncObject) // full & _index need to be in sync
            {
                return _full ? Capacity : _index;
            }
        }
    }

    public void AddRange(IEnumerable<T> items)
    {
        if (items == null)
            return;

        lock (SyncObject)
        {
            foreach (var item in items)
            {
                AddWithLock(item);
            }
        }
    }

    private void AddWithLock(T item)
    {
        _items[_index] = item;
        _index++;
        if (_index == Capacity)
        {
            _full = true;
            _index = 0;
        }
        TotalCount++;
    }

    public void Add(T item)
    {
        lock (SyncObject)
        {
            AddWithLock(item);
        }
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        lock (SyncObject)
        {
            _items = new T[Capacity];
            _index = 0;
            _full = false;
            TotalCount = 0;
        }
    }

    // this gives raw access to the underlying buffer. not sure I should keep that
    public T this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            return _items[index];
        }
    }

    public T[] GetTail(long startIndex)
    {
        long lostCount;
        return GetTail(startIndex, out lostCount);
    }

    public T[] GetTail(long startIndex, out long lostCount)
    {
        if (startIndex < 0 || startIndex >= TotalCount)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("startIndex");

        T[] array = ToArray();
        lostCount = (TotalCount - Count) - startIndex;
        if (lostCount >= 0)
            return array;

        lostCount = 0;

        // this maybe could optimized to not allocate the initial array
        // but in multi-threading environment, I suppose this is arguable (and more difficult).
        T[] chunk = new T[TotalCount - startIndex];
        Array.Copy(array, array.Length - (TotalCount - startIndex), chunk, 0, chunk.Length);
        return chunk;
    }

    public T[] ToArray()
    {
        lock (SyncObject)
        {
            T[] items = new T[_full ? Capacity : _index];
            if (_full)
            {
                if (_index == 0)
                {
                    Array.Copy(_items, items, Capacity);
                }
                else
                {
                    Array.Copy(_items, _index, items, 0, Capacity - _index);
                    Array.Copy(_items, 0, items, Capacity - _index, _index);
                }
            }
            else if (_index > 0)
            {
                Array.Copy(_items, items, _index);
            }
            return items;
        }
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return ToArray().AsEnumerable().GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

    bool ICollection<T>.Contains(T item)
    {
        return _items.Contains(item);
    }

    void ICollection<T>.CopyTo(T[] array, int arrayIndex)
    {
        if (array == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("array");

        if (array.Rank != 1)
            throw new ArgumentException(null, "array");

        if (arrayIndex < 0)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("arrayIndex");

        if ((array.Length - arrayIndex) < Count)
            throw new ArgumentException(null, "array");

        T[] thisArray = ToArray();
        Array.Copy(thisArray, 0, array, arrayIndex, thisArray.Length);
    }

    bool ICollection<T>.IsReadOnly
    {
        get
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    bool ICollection<T>.Remove(T item)
    {
        return false;
    }

    private static object _syncObject;
    private static object SyncObject
    {
        get
        {
            if (_syncObject == null)
            {
                object obj = new object();
                Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _syncObject, obj, null);
            }
            return _syncObject;
        }
    }
}
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Here is another implementation which uses Apache common collection's BoundedFifoBuffer . please use CircularFifoQueue if you are using latest JAR from Apache as below class is deprecated

    BoundedFifoBuffer apiCallHistory = new BoundedFifoBuffer(20);

    for(int i =1 ; i < 25; i++){

        if(apiCallHistory.isFull()){
          System.out.println("removing :: "+apiCallHistory.remove());
        }
        apiCallHistory.add(i);

}
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// The following is in C#

public class fqueue
{

  // The following code implements a circular queue of objects

  //private data:

    private bool empty;
    private bool full;

    private int begin, end;

    private object[] x;

  //public data:

    public fqueue()
    {
        empty = !(full = false);
        begin = end = 0xA2;

        x = new object[256];
        return;
    }

    public fqueue(int size)
    {
        if (1 > size) throw new Exception("fqueue: Size cannot be zero or negative");

        empty = !(full = false);
        begin = end = 0xA2;

        x = new object[size];
        return;
    }

    public object write
    {
        set
        {
            if(full) throw new Exception("Write error: Queue is full");

            end = empty ? end : (end + 1) % x.Length;

            full = ((end + 1) % x.Length) == begin;
            empty = false;

            x[end] = value;
        }
    }

    public object read
    {
        get
        {
            if(empty) throw new Exception("Read error: Queue is empty");
            full = false;

            object ret = x[begin];

            begin = (empty=end==begin) ?
                begin :
                (begin + 1) % x.Length;

            return ret;
        }
    }

    public int maxSize
    {
        get
        {
            return x.Length;
        }
    }

    public int queueSize
    {
        get
        {
            return end - begin + (empty ? 0 : 1 + ((end < begin) ? x.Length : 0));
        }
    }

    public bool isEmpty
    {
        get
        {
            return empty;
        }
    }

    public bool isFull
    {
        get
        {
            return full;
        }
    }

    public int start
    {
        get
        {
            return begin;
        }
    }        

    public int finish
    {
        get
        {
            return end;
        }
    }
}
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14  
Hate to say this, but this is some of the worst C# code I've ever seen. empty = !(full = false); wtf? begin = end = 0xA2; magic number FTL. Write-only properties are a wtf in themselves, write-only properties called write are doubly-so because imagine using it like this myqueue.write = someObj. Why on earth is read a property instead of vanilla function? And the queueSize function is beyond convoluted. This would make a cute entry in an obfuscated C# competition, but would likely get you fired if used in production. –  Juliet May 7 '11 at 23:31
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