Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose you have a sorted range (x to y) of values in an array.

x = 3;
y = 11;

array == 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

But it is possible that some values are duplicated and some are missing, so you might have:

array == 4, 5, 5, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 10

What's the best way in your language to find all duplicates and missing values so you get:

resultMissingValuesArray == 3, 6, 11
resultDuplicatesArray == 5, 5, 10

Here's some C++ code to get you started:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

const int kLastNumber = 50000; // last number expected in array
const int kFirstNumber = 3; // first number expected in array

int main()
{
    vector<int> myVector;

    // fill up vector, skip values at the beginning and end to check edge cases
    for(int x = kFirstNumber + 5; x < kLastNumber - 5; x++)
    {	
    	if(x % 12 != 0 &&  x % 13 != 0 && x % 17 != 0)
    		myVector.push_back(x);	// skip some values

    	else if(x % 9 == 0)
    	{
    		myVector.push_back(x);	// add duplicates
    		myVector.push_back(x);	
    	}

    	else if(x % 16 == 0)
    	{
    		myVector.push_back(x);	// add multiple duplicates
    		myVector.push_back(x);	
    		myVector.push_back(x);	
    		myVector.push_back(x);	
    	}
    }

    // put the results in here
    vector<int> missingValues;
    vector<int> duplicates;

    //  YOUR CODE GOES HERE         

    // validate missingValues for false positives
    for(int x = 0; x < (int) missingValues.size(); ++x)
    {
    	if(binary_search(myVector.begin(), myVector.end(), missingValues.at(x)))
    		cout << "Oh noes! You missed an unmissed value. Something went horribly, horribly wrong.";
    }

    // validate duplicates (I think... errr)
    vector<int>::iterator vecItr = myVector.begin();
    vector<int>::iterator dupItr = duplicates.begin();

    while(dupItr < duplicates.end())
    {
    	vecItr = adjacent_find(vecItr, myVector.end());		

    	if(*vecItr != *dupItr)
    		cout << "Oh noes! Something went horribly, horribly wrong.";

        // oh god
    	while(++dupItr != duplicates.end() && *(--dupItr) == *(++dupItr) && *vecItr == *(++vecItr));			

    	++vecItr;
    }

    return 0;
}

I didn't test the validation parts much, so there may be be something wrong with them (especially with the duplicates one).

I will post my own solution as an answer.

share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since you've marked it language-agnostic, here's the algorithm I'd use.

# Get numbers and sort them in ascending order.

input x,y;
input number[1..n];
sort number[1..n];

# Set dups and missing to empty sets.

dups = [];
missing = [];

# Get edge cases.

if number[1] > x:
    foreach i x .. number[1] - 1:
        missing.add(i)
if number[n] < y:
    foreach i number[n] + 1 .. y:
        missing.add(i)

# Process all numbers starting at second one.

foreach i 2 .. n:
    # If number same as last and not already in dups set, add it.

    if number[i] == number[i-1] and not dups.contains(number[i]):
        if number[i] >= x and number[i] <= y:
            dups.add(number[i])

    # If number not last number plus one, add all between the two
    #   to missing set.

    if number[i] != number[i-1] + 1:
        foreach j number[i-1] + 1 .. number[i] - 1:
            if j >= x and j <= y:
                missing.add(j)
share|improve this answer
    
Sigh. That's much nicer. I tried doing it as a for loop at first, but I somehow got on the wrong track and ended up with that while abomination. Thanks for this answer. (last line should be missing.add(j) though, I think) –  drby Feb 26 '09 at 12:14
    
Good catch (and the if-statement as well). The check for x and y were added later once I read the question properly :-) and I thought I'd take care of the possibility where x and y weren't necessarily the end points of the data. –  paxdiablo Feb 27 '09 at 12:28
add comment

my favourite - Python, very simple:

x = 3
y = 11
array = [ 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 ]
test  = [ 4, 5, 5, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 10 ]

resultMissingValuesArray = set(range(x,y+1)).difference(test)        
resultDuplicatesArray = reduce(lambda i,j: i+j, [[n]*(test.count(n)-1) for n in set(test) if test.count(n)>1], [])

duplicates can be more easily found by this line:

resultDuplicatesArray = [n for n in set(test) if test.count(n)>1]
# [5, 10] - just numbers, that have duplicates
# you can use test.count(5) for number of duplicates
share|improve this answer
add comment

Ruby:

x = 3
y = 11
array  = [ 4, 5, 5, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 10 ]

resultMissingValuesArray = (x..y).to_a - array
resultDuplicatesArray = array.delete_if { |e| array.index(e) == array.rindex(e) }.uniq
share|improve this answer
add comment

I think that you can do this fast in C++ by setting up a second array that acts as a check to see which elements have been found and then incrementing its elements by one each time an element is found. So:

int array = [3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11];
unsigned array_size = 9;
int test = [4,5,5,5,7,8,9,10,10];

// Find the maximum element in array
// This might not be necessary if it's given somewhere
unsigned max = 0;
unsigned min = -1;
for(unsigned i = 0; i < array_size; i++){
    if(array[i] > max)    max = array[i];
    if(array[i] < min)    min = array[i];
}

// Go make a counts vector to store how many examples of each value there are
vector< unsigned > counts(max+1, 0);
for(unsigned i = 0; i < array_size; i++)
    counts[test[i]]++;

// Gather the unique elements, duplicates and missing elements
vector< unsigned > unique;
vector< unsigned > duplicates;
vector< unsigned > missing;
for(unsigned i = min; i < max + 1; i++){
    switch(counts[i]){
        case 0 : missing.push_back(i);    break;
        case 1 : unique.push_back(i);     break;
        default: duplicates.push_back(i);
    }
}

This only works if you have numbers bigger than 0 in your array, which is often the case. The bonus is that it scales linearly in the number of elements, which is useful :-)

share|improve this answer
add comment
if(myVector.front() > kFirstNumber)
	for(int x = kFirstNumber; x < myVector.at(0); ++x)
		if(x >= kFirstNumber && x <= kLastNumber)
			missingValues.push_back(x);

for(int x = 1; x < (int) myVector.size(); ++x)
{
	if(myVector.at(x) == myVector.at(x - 1))
		if(x >= kFirstNumber && x <= kLastNumber)
			duplicates.push_back(myVector.at(x));

	if(myVector.at(x) != myVector.at(x - 1) + 1)
		for(int y = myVector.at(x - 1) + 1; y <= myVector[x] - 1; y++)
			if(y >= kFirstNumber && y <= kLastNumber)
				missingValues.push_back(y);
}	

if(myVector.back() < kLastNumber)
	for(int x = myVector.back() + 1; x <= kLastNumber; ++x)
		if(x >= kFirstNumber && x <= kLastNumber)
			missingValues.push_back(x);

(My solution was pretty ugly, so I replaced it with a C++ implementation of Pax's algorithm.)

share|improve this answer
    
The final loop for adding missing values at the end can be simplified to "while (itr <= kLastNumbers) { missingValues.push_back(itr++); }". You don't need missingAtEnd or the if statement. –  j_random_hacker Feb 26 '09 at 11:30
add comment

in python

consecutive=zip(l[0:-1],l[1:])
duplicate=[ a for (a,b) in consecutive if a==b]
missing=reduce(lambda u,v:u+v, [range(a+1,b) for (a,b) in consecutive])
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.