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I want append two string. I used the following command:

new_str = strcat(str1, str2);

This command changes the value of str1. I want new_str to be the concatanation of str1 and str2 and at the same time str1 is not to be changed.

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2  
You're right, that's what it does. –  Charlie Martin May 5 '11 at 16:35
1  
For various reasons, you might want to keep track of the sizes of str1, str2, and new_str, and use strncat instead of just strcat). It'll help avoid some buffer overflow errors. –  Brendan Long May 5 '11 at 16:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You need to allocate new space as well. Consider this code fragment:

char * new_str ;
if((new_str = malloc(strlen(str1)+strlen(str2)+1)) != NULL){
    new_str[0] = '\0';   // ensures the memory is an empty string
    strcat(new_str,str1);
    strcat(new_str,str2);
} else {
    fprintf(STDERR,"malloc failed!\n");
    // exit?
}

You might want to consider strnlen(3) which is slightly safer.

Updated, see above. In some versions of the C runtime, the memory returned by malloc isn't initialized to 0. I believe the newer C spec actually requires malloc to do so, but just in case, setting the first byte of new_str to zero ensures that it looks like an empty string to strcat.

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4  
malloc can always return rubbish, and it does even on modern systems. calloc gives you zeroed memory. –  porneL Dec 22 '12 at 23:32
    
And calloc also often takes sizeof(space) time to do it. If you're doing lots of strings and you're careful with your pointers, you can save a lot of redundant instructions. –  Charlie Martin Dec 24 '12 at 4:01

do the following:
strcat(new_str,str1);
strcat(new_str,str2);

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2  
With the caveat that new_str has to be initialized to an empty string. –  indiv May 5 '11 at 16:38
2  
And of the proper size!! –  Bo Persson May 5 '11 at 18:49

You'll have to strncpy str1 into new_string first then.

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strcpy(str1+strlen(str1), str2);

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You could use asprintf to concatenate both into a new string:

char *new_str;
asprintf(&new_str,"%s%s",str1,str2);
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You can try something like this:

strncpy(new_str, str1, strlen(str1));
strcat(new_str, str2);

More info on strncpy: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstring/strncpy/

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1  
That's just horrible, there's no point in doing strlen(str1) here and using strncpy(), a plain strcpy() does the same thing. If you used sizeof new_str there would be a point. –  unwind May 5 '11 at 16:40
1  
I don't know if it's a typo or a gross misunderstanding of the n parameter of strncpy, but you need to provide the buffer size of new_str, not the length of str1. What happens here if new_str holds 5 characters but str1 is 1000 characters long? –  indiv May 5 '11 at 16:49
    
@indiv no misunderstanding. strncpy reference - num - Copies the first num characters of source to destination. Of course the length of the source buffer should be checked prior to this operation –  Ulterior Jun 12 '13 at 4:11

man page of strcat says that arg1 and arg2 are appended to arg1.. and returns the pointer of s1. If you dont want disturb str1,str2 then you have write your own function.

char * my_strcat(const char * str1, const char * str2)
{
   char * ret = malloc(strlen(str1)+strlen(str2));

   if(ret!=NULL)
   {
     sprintf(ret, "%s%s", str1, str2);
     return ret;
   }
   return NULL;    
}

Hope this solves your purpose

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1  
I don't like the usage of printf for string concatenation. It can be easyly done using strcpy, strcat or even memcpy –  eyalm May 5 '11 at 16:43
    
ya you are write.. but i thought to give u in a single statement.. or you can do strcpy(ret, str1) and then strcat(ret, str2). or as you said it will be faster with memcpy. –  maheshgupta024 May 5 '11 at 16:52
1  
How much space do you have go allocate for a copied string? Hint: It's not strlen(str). –  Bo Persson May 5 '11 at 18:51
    
I feel its strlen only, its not sizeof(). –  maheshgupta024 May 5 '11 at 20:13
    
I thrown upon any code doing mallocs inside functions like that! –  Ulterior Jun 12 '13 at 4:11

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