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In a c# threading app, if I were to lock an object, let us say a queue, and if an exception occurs, will the object stay locked? Here is the pseudo-code:

int ii;
lock(MyQueue)
{
   MyClass LclClass = (MyClass)MyQueue.Dequeue();
   try
   {
      ii = int.parse(LclClass.SomeString);
   }
   catch
   {
     MessageBox.Show("Error parsing string");
   }
}

As I understand it, code after the catch doesn't execute - but I have been wondering if the lock will be freed.

share|improve this question
1  
As a final thought (see updates) - you should probably only hold the lock for the duration of the dequeue... do the processing outside of the lock. – Marc Gravell Feb 26 '09 at 11:38
    
Code after catch does execute because the exception is handled – cjk Feb 26 '09 at 12:02
    
Thanks I must have missed that one, should I delete this question? – Vort3x Feb 27 '12 at 15:11
2  
It seems that the sample code is not good for this question, but the question is pretty valid. – SalvadorGomez Apr 11 '12 at 19:55
up vote 52 down vote accepted

First; have you considered TryParse?

in li;
if(int.TryParse(LclClass.SomeString, out li)) {
    // li is now assigned
} else {
    // input string is dodgy
}

The lock will be released for 2 reasons; first, lock is essentially:

Monitor.Enter(lockObj);
try {
  // ...
} finally {
    Monitor.Exit(lockObj);
}

Second; you catch and don't re-throw the inner exception, so the lock never actually sees an exception. Of course, you are holding the lock for the duration of a MessageBox, which might be a problem.

So it will be released in all but the most fatal catastrophic unrecoverable exceptions.

share|improve this answer
9  
I am aware of the tryparse, but it is not truly relevant to my question. This was simple code to explain the question - not a true concern regarding the parse. Please replace the parse with any code that will force the catch and makes you comfortable. – Khadaji Feb 26 '09 at 13:01
7  
How about throw new Exception("for illustrative purposes"); ;-p – Marc Gravell Feb 26 '09 at 13:54
1  
Except if a TheadAbortException occurs between the Monitor.Enter and try: blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2009/03/06/… – Igal Tabachnik Oct 1 '09 at 8:26

I note that no one has mentioned in their answers to this old question that releasing a lock upon an exception is an incredibly dangerous thing to do. Yes, lock statements in C# have "finally" semantics; when control exits the lock normally or abnormally, the lock is released. You're all talking about this like it is a good thing, but it is a bad thing! The right thing to do if you have a locked region that throws an unhandled exception is to terminate the diseased process immediately before it destroys more user data, not free the lock and keep on going.

Look at it this way: suppose you have a bathroom with a lock on the door and a line of people waiting outside. A bomb in the bathroom goes off, killing the person in there. Your question is "in that situation will the lock be automatically unlocked so the next person can get into the bathroom?" Yes, it will. That is not a good thing. A bomb just went off in there and killed someone! The plumbing is probably destroyed, the house is no longer structurally sound, and there might be another bomb in there. The right thing to do is get everyone out as quickly as possible and demolish the entire house.

I mean, think it through: if you locked a region of code in order to read from a data structure without it being mutated on another thread, and something in that data structure threw an exception, odds are good that it is because the data structure is corrupt. User data is now messed up; you don't want to try to save user data at this point because you are then saving corrupt data. Just terminate the process.

If you locked a region of code in order to perform a mutation without another thread reading the state at the same time, and the mutation throws, then if the data was not corrupt before, it sure is now. Which is exactly the scenario that the lock is supposed to protect against. Now code that is waiting to read that state will immediately be given access to corrupt state, and probably itself crash. Again, the right thing to do is to terminate the process.

No matter how you slice it, an exception inside a lock is bad news. The right question to ask is not "will my lock be cleaned up in the event of an exception?" The right question to ask is "how do I ensure that there is never an exception inside a lock? And if there is, then how do I structure my program so that mutations are rolled back to previous good states?"

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7  
That issue is pretty orthogonal to locking IMO. If you get an expected exception, you want to clean up everything, including locks. And if you get an unexpected exception, you have a problem, with or without locks. – CodesInChaos Feb 28 '12 at 12:12
5  
I think that the situation described above is a generalism. Sometimes exceptions describe catastrophic events. Sometimes they do not. Each one uses them differently in the code. It is perfectly valid that an exception is a signal of an exceptional but non catastrophic event - assuming exceptions=catastrophic, process terminating case is too specific. The fact that is might be a catastrophic event does not remove from the validity of the question - the same train of thought could lead you to never handle any exception, in which case the process will be exited... – Gerasimos R Oct 31 '12 at 10:29
1  
@GerasimosR: Indeed. Two points to emphasize. First, exceptions should be assumed to be catastrophic until determined to be benign. Second, if you are getting a benign exception thrown out of a locked region then the locked region is probably badly designed; it is probably doing too much work inside the lock. – Eric Lippert Nov 19 '12 at 17:08
    
I would posit that the proper thing to do in your scenario would be to have the code that stack-walks out of the bathroom after the bomb goes off put an "out of order" sign there. Simply leaving the bathroom locked might be "safe", but would be needlessly unhelpful. It may make sense to shut everything down if there's anyone that needs to use the bathroom and can't cope with its being unavailable, but if everyone who was in line for the bathroom has a strategy to deal with its being unavailable [perhaps go to another one] there's no reason life shouldn't go on. – supercat Apr 1 '13 at 17:22

yes, that will release properly; lock acts as try/finally, with the Monitor.Exit(myLock) in the finally, so no matter how you exit it will be released. As a side-note, catch(... e) {throw e;} is best avoided, as that damages the stack-trace on e; it is better not to catch it at all, or alternatively: use throw; rather than throw e; which does a re-throw.

If you really want to know, a lock in C#4 / .NET 4 is:

{
    bool haveLock = false;
    try {
       Monitor.Enter(myLock, ref haveLock);
    } finally {
       if(haveLock) Monitor.Exit(myLock);
    }
} 
share|improve this answer

"A lock statement is compiled to a call to Monitor.Enter, and then a try…finally block. In the finally block, Monitor.Exit is called.

The JIT code generation for both x86 and x64 ensures that a thread abort cannot occur between a Monitor.Enter call and a try block that immediately follows it."

Taken from: This site

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There is at least one case where this isn't true: Thread abortion in debug mode on .net versions before 4. The reason is that the C# compiler inserts a NOP between the Monitor.Enter and the try, so that the "immediately follows" condition of the JIT is violated. – CodesInChaos Feb 28 '12 at 12:13

Just to add a little to Marc's excellent answer.

Situations like this are the very reason for the existence of the lock keyword. It helps developers make sure the lock is released in the finally block.

If you're forced to use Monitor.Enter/Exit e.g. to support a timeout, you must make sure to place the call to Monitor.Exit in the finally block to ensure proper release of the lock in case of an exception.

share|improve this answer

Your lock will be released properly. A lock acts like this:

try {
    Monitor.Enter(myLock);
    // ...
} finally {
    Monitor.Exit(myLock);
}

And finally blocks are guaranteed to execute, no matter how you leave the try block.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, no code is "guaranteed" to execute (you could pull the power cable, for example), and that is not quite what a lock looks like in 4.0 - see here – Marc Gravell Feb 27 '12 at 14:52
    
@MarcGravell: I thought about putting two footnotes about those exact two points. And then I figured it wouldn't matter much :) – Ryan O'Hara Feb 27 '12 at 14:53
    
@MarcGravel: I think everyone assumes always one is not talking about a 'pull the plug' situation, as it is not something a programmer has any control over :) – Vort3x Feb 27 '12 at 15:14

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