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I am starting Internet Explorer programatically with code that looks like this:

ProcessStartInfo startInfo = new ProcessStartInfo("iexplore.exe");
startInfo.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
startInfo.Arguments = "http://www.google.com";
Process ieProcess = Process.Start(startInfo);

This generates 2 processes visible in the Windows Task Manager. Then, I attempt to kill the process with:

ieProcess.Kill();

This results in one of the processes in Task Manager being shut down, and the other remains. I tried checking for any properties that would have children processes, but found none. How can I kill the other process also? More generally, how do you kill all the processes associated with a process that you start with Process.Start?

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1  
Maybe I'm missing something, but how come this starts two processes? – Etienne de Martel May 5 '11 at 17:20
    
@Etienne I don't know, I thought the same thing. But when I launch IE normally it also starts 2 processes. I don't know if this is of note, but I'm using 32-bit IE on a 64 bit machine. – robr May 5 '11 at 17:23
1  
@Etienne de Martel: IE uses several processes for its UI, basically 1 main process + 1 child process per open tab. – Dirk Vollmar May 5 '11 at 17:30
    
@0xA3 Interesting, I assumed it simply worked like Firefox and had one process and a bunch of constantly hanging threads. – Etienne de Martel May 5 '11 at 17:30
    
thanks for your modified snippet/class – binball May 7 '11 at 0:03
up vote 24 down vote accepted

This worked very nicely for me:

    /// <summary>
    /// Kill a process, and all of its children, grandchildren, etc.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="pid">Process ID.</param>
    private static void KillProcessAndChildren(int pid)
    {
        ManagementObjectSearcher searcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher
          ("Select * From Win32_Process Where ParentProcessID=" + pid);
        ManagementObjectCollection moc = searcher.Get();
        foreach (ManagementObject mo in moc)
        {
            KillProcessAndChildren(Convert.ToInt32(mo["ProcessID"]));
        }
        try
        {
            Process proc = Process.GetProcessById(pid);
            proc.Kill();
        }
        catch (ArgumentException)
        {
            // Process already exited.
        }
    }

Update 2016-04-26

Tested on Visual Studio 2015 Update 2 on Win7 x64. Still works as well now as it did 3 years ago.

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What about grandchildren? Methinks this should be a recursive method. – kerem Jul 17 '13 at 14:31
5  
@kerem erm I think it is – daveL Feb 21 '14 at 11:01
1  
@daveL - brain melt – kerem Feb 21 '14 at 12:49

You should call Process.CloseMainWindow() which will send a message to the main window of the process. Think of it as having the user click the "X" close button or File | Exit menu item.

It is safer to send a message to Internet Explorer to close itself down, than go and kill all its processes. Those processes could be doing anything and you need to let IE do its thing and finish before just killing it in the middle of doing something that may be important for future runs. This goes true for any program you kill.

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4  
I think this is the preferred way...for processes that have UIs. – robr Dec 3 '12 at 20:35

If anyone is interested, I took one of the answers from the other page and modified it slightly. It is a self contained class now with static methods. It does not have proper error handling or logging. Modify to use for your own needs. Providing your root Process to KillProcessTree will do it.

class ProcessUtilities
{
    public static void KillProcessTree(Process root)
    {
        if (root != null)
        {
            var list = new List<Process>();
            GetProcessAndChildren(Process.GetProcesses(), root, list, 1);

            foreach (Process p in list)
            {
                try
                {
                    p.Kill();
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    //Log error?
                }
            }
        }
    }

    private static int GetParentProcessId(Process p)
    {
        int parentId = 0;
        try
        {
            ManagementObject mo = new ManagementObject("win32_process.handle='" + p.Id + "'");
            mo.Get();
            parentId = Convert.ToInt32(mo["ParentProcessId"]);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString());
            parentId = 0;
        }
        return parentId;
    }

    private static void GetProcessAndChildren(Process[] plist, Process parent, List<Process> output, int indent)
    {
        foreach (Process p in plist)
        {
            if (GetParentProcessId(p) == parent.Id)
            {
                GetProcessAndChildren(plist, p, output, indent + 1);
            }
        }
        output.Add(parent);
    }
}
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Are you using IE8 or IE9? That would absolutely start more than one process due to its new multi-process architecture. Anyway, have a look at this other answer for getting a process tree and killing it.

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Yes, this answers both why 2 processes start, and how to kill the process tree. Somehow I couldn't find this earlier, thanks. – robr May 5 '11 at 17:31
    
Although, I have to admit, I was expecting it to be a lot simpler. Barf. – robr May 5 '11 at 17:33
    
@robr: If the code works, it should be a simple copy and paste away from success. – Matthew Ferreira May 5 '11 at 17:34

Another solution is to use the taskill command. I use the next code in my applications:

public static void Kill()
{
    try
    {
            ProcessStartInfo processStartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo("taskkill", "/F /T /IM your_parent_process_to_kill.exe")
            {
                WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden,
                CreateNoWindow = true,
                UseShellExecute = false,
                WorkingDirectory = System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory,
                RedirectStandardOutput = true,
                RedirectStandardError = true
            };
            Process.Start(processStartInfo);
    }
    catch { }
}
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How to properly finish Internet Explorer that's launched from Powershell?

Several of those commented in the above thread that this is caused by a bug in Win7 (as it does not seem to occur for users that are using other versions of windows). Many pages on the internet, including microsoft's page claim user error, and tell you to simply use the available quit method on the IE object which is SUPPOSED to close all child processes as well (and reportedly does in Win8/XP etc)

I must admit, for my part, it WAS user error. I am in win7 and the reason the quit method was not working for me was because of an error in coding. Namely I was creating the IE object at declaration, and then creating another (attached to the same object) later on in the code... I had almost finished hacking the parent-child killing routine to work for me when I realized the issue.

Because of how IE functions, the processID you spawned as the parent could be attached to other windows/subprocesses that you did NOT create. Use quit, and keep in mind that depending on user settings (like empty cache on exit) it could take a few minutes for the processes to finish their tasks and close.

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