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What is the PHP ? : operator called and what does it do?

What does this mean in longform? I haven't seen a line like this.

$max_o = $max_o > $o ? $max_o : $o;
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marked as duplicate by Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, eldarerathis, Rudu, NikiC, zzzzBov May 5 '11 at 18:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is the same as saying:

if($max_o <= $o) {
    $max_o = $o;
}

But in longhand it says

if($max_o > $o) {
    $max_o = $max_o;
}
else {
    $max_o = $o;
}

Which is rather pointless. This is a poor usage of the ternary operator since my first simple example would do just as well.

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1  
+1 for least code, though the construct in the question does include an "else". –  AJ. May 5 '11 at 18:01
    
yep, I thought the same thing after I posted, as you can see I edited my answer –  Abel Mohler May 5 '11 at 18:05
    
+1 For answering the question and giving an alternate solution. –  Chad May 5 '11 at 18:20
    
Thanks! helped me out, makes perfect sense. –  Collin White May 5 '11 at 19:54
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if ($max_o > $o)
{
    $max_o = $max_o;
}
else
{
    $max_o = $o;
}
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This is the php ternary operator. It is like the following code:

if ($max_o > o)
  $max_o = $max_o;
else
  $max_o = $o;
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The question mark is a ternary operator

it is the same as typing

if ($max_o > $o) {
    $max_o = $max_o;
} else {
    $max_o = $o;
}
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What you actually want to write is:

$max_o = max($max_o, $o);

Apart from that, the thing's called ternary operator and is a shortcut syntax for an if-statement.

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