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The runtime of this code on my laptop for a 4.2 GB input file is 48 seconds. The input file is tab-delimited, with each value appearing in quotes. Each record ends with a newline, e.g. '"val1"\t"val2"\t"val3"\t..."valn"\n'

I've tried using multiprocessing with 10 threads: One to queue up the lines, 8 to parse individual lines and fill an output queue, and one to reduce the output queue into the defaultdict shown below, but the code took 300 seconds to run, over 6 times longer than the following:

from collections import defaultdict
def get_users(log):
    users = defaultdict(int)
    f = open(log)
    # Read header line
    h = f.readline().strip().replace('"', '').split('\t')
    ix_profile = h.index('profile.type')
    ix_user = h.index('profile.id')
    # If either ix_* is the last field in h, it will include a newline. 
    # That's fine for now.
    for (i, line) in enumerate(f): 
        if i % 1000000 == 0: print "Line %d" % i # progress notification

        l = line.split('\t')
        if l[ix_profile] != '"7"': # "7" indicates a bad value
            # use list slicing to remove quotes
            users[l[ix_user][1:-1]] += 1 

    f.close()
    return users

I've checked that I'm not I/O-bound by removing everything but the print statement from the for loop. That code ran in 9 seconds, which I'll consider a lower-bound for how fast this code can run.

I have a lot of these 5 GB files to process, so even a pretty small improvement in runtime (I know, I can remove the print!) will help. The machine I am running on has 4 cores, so I can't help but wonder if there's a way to get the multithread/multiprocess code to run faster than the code above.

UPDATE:

I rewrote the multiprocessing code as follows:

from multiprocessing import Pool, cpu_count
from collections import defaultdict

def parse(line, ix_profile=10, ix_user=9):
    """ix_profile and ix_user predetermined; hard-coding for expedience."""
    l = line.split('\t')
    if l[ix_profile] != '"7"':
        return l[ix_user][1:-1]

def get_users_mp():
    f = open('20110201.txt')
    h = f.readline() # remove header line
    pool = Pool(processes=cpu_count())
    result_iter = pool.imap_unordered(parse, f, 100)
    users = defaultdict(int)
    for r in result_iter:
        if r is not None:
            users[r] += 1
    return users

It runs in 26 seconds, a 1.85x speedup. Not bad, but with 4 cores, not as much as I had hoped for.

share|improve this question
    
The easiest way to take advantage of multiple cores is probably to run 4 copies at once (using subprocess), then combine the output, possibly by saving/loading a pickle of the dictionary. –  thouis May 5 '11 at 18:54
1  
I'm not seeing a reason why it should be much slower then the 9 seconds. Can you provide a sample of the file you are reading? –  Winston Ewert May 5 '11 at 18:56
    
@Winston, the file has 40 tab-delimited columns with fields ranging from 1 to 80 characters, and 8,250,000 lines. I can't provide a sample of the data, unfortunately. –  Jason Sundram May 5 '11 at 19:37
    
Have you considered gnu cut and grep? –  MattH May 5 '11 at 21:45
1  
This would be a great question for codereview.stackexchange.com –  Acorn May 5 '11 at 22:34

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use regular expressions.

A test determines that the expensive part of the process is the call to str.split(). Probably having to construct a list and a bunch of string objects for every line is expensive.

Firstly, you need to construct a regular expression to match against the line. Something like:

expression = re.compile(r'("[^"]")\t("[^"]")\t')

If you call expression.match(line).groups(), you'll get the first two columns extracted as two string objects and you can do logic with those directly.

Now this assumes that the two columns of interest are the first two columns. If not you'll just have to tweak the regular expression to match the correct columns. Your code checks the header to see where the columns are located. You can generate the regular expression based on that, but I'm gonna guess that the columns are really always located at the same place. Just verify that they are still there and use a regular expression on the lines.

EDIT

from collections import defaultdict import re

def get_users(log):
    f = open(log)
    # Read header line
    h = f.readline().strip().replace('\'', '').split('\t')
    ix_profile = h.index('profile.type')
    ix_user = h.index('profile.id')

    assert ix_user < ix_profile

This code assumes that user is before profile

    keep_field = r'"([^"]*)"'

This regular expression will capture a single column

    skip_field = r'"[^"]*"'

This regular expression will match the column, but not capture the results. (Note the lack of parenthesis)

    fields = [skip_field] * len(h)
    fields[ix_profile] = keep_field
    fields[ix_user] = keep_field

Create a list for all the fields, and only the keep the ones we care about

    del fields[max(ix_profile, ix_user)+1:]

Eliminate all the fields after the ones we care about (they take time to match, and we don't care about them)

    regex = re.compile(r"\t".join(fields))

Actually produce the regex.

    users = defaultdict(int)
    for line in f:
        user, profile = regex.match(line).groups()

Pull out the two values, and do the logic

        if profile != "7": # "7" indicates a bad value
            # use list slicing to remove quotes
            users[user] += 1 

    f.close()
    return users
share|improve this answer
    
my regex-fu is apparently not strong enough. The data is located in columns 9 (user) and 10 (profile type). The regex I used was re.compile('\t.*"(.+)"\t"7"\t'), but the code was much slower. Is there a good way to pull out just those columns? –  Jason Sundram May 6 '11 at 18:02
    
@Jason, I've put my code up there which shows how I did it. Your regular expression doesn't make sense me, you seem to be checking for a 7, but isn't that going to hit false positives? Its probably also slower. You want to construct a regular expression which matches the whole line (at least as much of the line as you care about) –  Winston Ewert May 6 '11 at 19:16
    
good point re: my tragically flawed regex. I ran your code over my data and it took 29 seconds (single-threaded), a very good improvement over my 48 seconds. I'll see how it does when threaded. –  Jason Sundram May 6 '11 at 20:48
    
Interestingly, it doesn't do any better when threaded. –  Jason Sundram May 6 '11 at 21:24
    
@Jason, not surprising. threading works better when you have large tasks you can split up. For a task this small the overhead of IPC will overcome it. However, if you have a ton of these files, then processes different files on the four cores should give you a decent speedup. –  Winston Ewert May 6 '11 at 21:42

If you're running unix or cygwin, the following little script would produce you the frequency of user id's where profile != 7. Should be quick.

Updated with awk to count the user ids

#!/bin/bash

FILENAME="test.txt"

IX_PROFILE=`head -1 ${FILENAME} | sed -e 's/\t/\n/g' | nl -w 1 | grep profile.type | cut -f1`
IX_USER=`head -1 ${FILENAME} | sed -e 's/\t/\n/g' | nl -w 1 | grep profile.id | cut -f1`
# Just the userids
# sed 1d ${FILENAME} | cut -f${IX_PROFILE},${IX_USER} | grep -v \"7\" | cut -f2

# userids counted:
# sed 1d ${FILENAME} | cut -f${IX_PROFILE},${IX_USER} | grep -v \"7\" | cut -f2 | sort | uniq -c

# Count using awk..?
sed 1d ${FILENAME} | cut -f${IX_PROFILE},${IX_USER} | grep -v \"7\" | cut -f2 | awk '{ count[$1]++; } END { for (x in count) { print x "\t" count[x] } }'
share|improve this answer
    
I had to tweak this a bit to get it to work (the sed -e part). But when I did get it working, it took 4 minutes and 49 seconds. I think the sort (n log(n)) is killing the performance. –  Jason Sundram May 6 '11 at 14:29
    
@Jason Sundram: Well, I just tested it on a file that I wrote by hand based on assumptions from your code. How many unique userids do you have, what is their format? –  MattH May 6 '11 at 15:02
    
there are 2.6 million unique userids, they are alphanumeric strings like this: "6a7746195b2f3cbbebde7e8e27a50d409590d7b8" –  Jason Sundram May 6 '11 at 17:03
    
using awk, it's much faster: 1 minute and 45 seconds. Still slower than naive python though. –  Jason Sundram May 6 '11 at 17:10

Seeing that your log file is tab-delimited, you can use the csv module - with a dialect='excel-tab' argument - for a nice performance and readability boost. That is, of course, if you have to use Python instead of the much faster console commands.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the tip. The code is definitely more readable and clear (10 lines including the import statement), but it takes 88 seconds –  Jason Sundram May 6 '11 at 18:14
    
@Jason: You haven't posed your full code after the multiprocessing update. What does the parse_split function do? Regardless, it seems that each of your pool processes reads lines from the file. This is sub-optimal because you have multiple processes competing for the same resource. Try loading the lines in your main process and pass them to the worker processes using a queue. –  ktdrv May 6 '11 at 19:00
    
whoops, parse_split was supposed to just be parse. All the code is there. I thought specifying the chunk size to imap_unordered would mitigate some of the contention (let everyone grab 100 lines and then deal with them). Reading the whole file into memory takes a lot longer than just scrolling through it, so I'm not sure this would result in an a performance increase. I'll try it out and let you know. –  Jason Sundram May 6 '11 at 23:02

If using regexes can speed it up so much by ignoring the tail of the line that doesn't need to be split, perhaps a more straightforward approach might help:

[snip)
ix_profile = h.index('profile.type')
ix_user = h.index('profile.id')
maxsplits = max(ix_profile, ix_user) + 1 #### new statement ####
# If either ix_* is the last field in h, it will include a newline. 
# That's fine for now.
for (i, line) in enumerate(f): 
    if i % 1000000 == 0: print "Line %d" % i # progress notification
    l = line.split('\t', maxsplits) #### changed line ####
[snip]

Please give that a whirl on your data.

share|improve this answer
    
Smart idea. See the result in the edit of my answer. –  eyquem May 7 '11 at 13:05

Maybe you can do

users[l[ix_user]] += 1 

instead of

users[l[ix_user][1:-1]] += 1 

and remove the quotes on the dict at the end. Should save some time.

For the multi-threading approach: try reading a few thousand lines from the file each time and passing those thousand lines to a thread to process. Doing it line-by-line seems to be too much overhead.

Or read on the solution in this article as he seems to be doing something very similar to what you're trying to do.

share|improve this answer
    
@Claudio, removing the slicing doesn't make a significant difference (it actually adds 2 seconds, for reasons I'm not clear on) –  Jason Sundram May 5 '11 at 19:40

This may be slightly besides the point, but Python has some extremely strange behavior when dealing with multiple threads (particularly bad when the threads aren't IO bound). More specifically, it sometimes runs much slower than when single-threaded. This is due to the way that the Global Interpreter Lock (GIL) in Python gets used to ensure that no more than one thread can execute in the Python interpreter at any given time.

Because of the constraint that only one thread can actually use the interpreter at any given time, the fact that you have multiple cores won't help you. In fact, it might actually make things much worse due to some pathological interactions between two threads trying to acquire the GIL. If you want to stick to Python you have one of two options:

  1. Try using the Python 3.2 (or higher, 3.0 won't work). It has a massively different way of dealing with the GIL which fixes the multithreaded slowdown issue in a number of cases. I'm assuming that you aren't using the Python 3 series since you're using the old print statement.
  2. Use processes instead of threads. Since processes share open file descriptors, you don't really need to pass any state in between the processes once you actually start eating the file (you could use pipes or messages if you really needed to). This will somewhat increase the initial startup time because processes take more time to create than threads, but you avoid the GIL issue.

If you want more information on this wonderfully arcane bit of Python look up the talks related to the GIL on this page: http://www.dabeaz.com/talks.html.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm using multiprocessing explicitly to get around GIL problems with Threads. –  Jason Sundram May 6 '11 at 13:46

I realize that I had nearly exactly the same idea than Winston Ewert: building a regex.

But my regex:

  • is done to the cases in which ix_profile < ix_user as well the cases in which ix_profile > ix_user

  • the regex captures only the user's column: the profile's column is matched with a sub-pattern '"(?!7")[^\t\r\n"]*"' that doesn't match if "7" is present in this column; so we obtain only the correct user with the only group defined

.

Additionally, I tested several algorithms of matching and extracting:

1) with re.finditer()

2) with re.match() and the regex matching 40 fields

3) withe re.match() and the regex matching only max(ix_profile,ix_user) + 1 fields

4) like 3 but with a simple dictionary instead of a defaultdict instance

To measure times, my code creates a file based on the information you gave concerning its content.

.

I tested the 4 following functions in 4 codes:

1

def get_users_short_1(log):
    users_short = defaultdict(int)
    f = open(log)
    # Read header line
    h = f.readline().strip().replace('"', '').split('\t')
    ix_profile = h.index('profile.type')
    ix_user = h.index('profile.id')
    # If either ix_* is the last field in h, it will include a newline. 
    # That's fine for now.

    glo = 40*['[^\t]*']
    glo[ix_profile] = '"(?!7")[^\t"]+"'
    glo[ix_user] = '"([^\t"]*)"'
    glo[39] = '"[^\t\r\n]*"'
    regx = re.compile('^'+'\t'.join(glo),re.MULTILINE)

    content = f.read()
    for mat in regx.finditer(content):
        users_short[mat.group(1)] += 1

    f.close()
    return users_short

2

def get_users_short_2(log):
    users_short = defaultdict(int)
    f = open(log)
    # Read header line
    h = f.readline().strip().replace('"', '').split('\t')
    ix_profile = h.index('profile.type')
    ix_user = h.index('profile.id')
    # If either ix_* is the last field in h, it will include a newline. 
    # That's fine for now.

    glo = 40*['[^\t]*']
    glo[ix_profile] = '"(?!7")[^\t"]*"'
    glo[ix_user] = '"([^\t"]*)"'
    regx = re.compile('\t'.join(glo))


    for line in f:
        gugu = regx.match(line)
        if gugu:
            users_short[gugu.group(1)] += 1
    f.close()
    return users_short

3

def get_users_short_3(log):
    users_short = defaultdict(int)
    f = open(log)
    # Read header line
    h = f.readline().strip().replace('"', '').split('\t')
    ix_profile = h.index('profile.type')
    ix_user = h.index('profile.id')
    # If either ix_* is the last field in h, it will include a newline. 
    # That's fine for now.

    glo = (max(ix_profile,ix_user) + 1) * ['[^\t]*']
    glo[ix_profile] = '"(?!7")[^\t"]*"'
    glo[ix_user] = '"([^\t"]*)"'
    regx = re.compile('\t'.join(glo))

    for line in f:
        gugu = regx.match(line)
        if gugu:
            users_short[gugu.group(1)] += 1

    f.close()
    return users_short

4

The full code 4, that seems to be the fastest:

import re
from random import choice,randint,sample
import csv
import random
from time import clock

choi = 1
if choi:
    ntot = 1000
    chars = 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789'
    def ry(a=30,b=80,chars=chars,nom='abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'):
        if a==30:
            return ''.join(choice(chars) for i in xrange(randint(30,80)))
        else:
            return ''.join(choice(nom) for i in xrange(randint(8,12)))

    num = sample(xrange(1000),200)
    num.sort()
    print 'num==',num
    several = [e//3 for e in xrange(0,800,7) if e//3 not in num]
    print
    print 'several==',several

    with open('biggy.txt','w') as f:
        head = ('aaa','bbb','ccc','ddd','profile.id','fff','ggg','hhhh','profile.type','iiii',
                'jjj','kkkk','lll','mmm','nnn','ooo','ppp','qq','rr','ss',
                'tt','uu','vv','ww','xx','yy','zz','razr','fgh','ty',
                'kfgh','zer','sdfs','fghf','dfdf','zerzre','jkljkl','vbcvb','kljlk','dhhdh')
        f.write('\t'.join(head)+'\n')
        for i in xrange(1000):
            li = [ ry(a=8).join('""') if n==4 else ry().join('""')
                   for n in xrange(40) ]
            if i in num:
                li[4] = '@#~&=*;'
                li[8] = '"7"'
            if i in several:
                li[4] = '"BRAD"'
            f.write('\t'.join(li)+'\n')



from collections import defaultdict
def get_users(log):
    users = defaultdict(int)
    f = open(log)
    # Read header line
    h = f.readline().strip().replace('"', '').split('\t')
    ix_profile = h.index('profile.type')
    ix_user = h.index('profile.id')
    # If either ix_* is the last field in h, it will include a newline. 
    # That's fine for now.
    for (i, line) in enumerate(f): 
        #if i % 1000000 == 0: print "Line %d" % i # progress notification

        l = line.split('\t')
        if l[ix_profile] != '"7"': # "7" indicates a bad value
            # use list slicing to remove quotes

            users[l[ix_user][1:-1]] += 1 
    f.close()
    return users




def get_users_short_4(log):
    users_short = {}
    f = open(log)
    # Read header line
    h = f.readline().strip().replace('"', '').split('\t')
    ix_profile = h.index('profile.type')
    ix_user = h.index('profile.id')
    # If either ix_* is the last field in h, it will include a newline. 
    # That's fine for now.

    glo = (max(ix_profile,ix_user) + 1) * ['[^\t]*']
    glo[ix_profile] = '"(?!7")[^\t"]*"'
    glo[ix_user] = '"([^\t"]*)"'
    regx = re.compile('\t'.join(glo))

    for line in f:
        gugu = regx.match(line)
        if gugu:
            gugugroup = gugu.group(1)
            if gugugroup in users_short:
                users_short[gugugroup] += 1
            else:
                users_short[gugugroup] = 1

    f.close()
    return users_short




print '\n\n'

te = clock()
USERS = get_users('biggy.txt')
t1 = clock()-te

te = clock()
USERS_short_4 = get_users_short_4('biggy.txt')
t2 = clock()-te



if choi:
    print '\nlen(num)==',len(num),' : number of lines with ix_profile==\'"7"\''
    print "USERS['BRAD']==",USERS['BRAD']
    print 'then :'
    print str(ntot)+' lines - '+str(len(num))+' incorrect - '+str(len(several))+\
          ' identical + 1 user BRAD = '+str(ntot - len(num)-len(several)+1)    
print '\nlen(USERS)==',len(USERS)
print 'len(USERS_short_4)==',len(USERS_short_4)
print 'USERS == USERS_short_4 is',USERS == USERS_short_4

print '\n----------------------------------------'
print 'time of get_users() :\n', t1,'\n----------------------------------------'
print 'time of get_users_short_4 :\n', t2,'\n----------------------------------------'
print 'get_users_short_4() / get_users() = '+str(100*t2/t1)+ ' %'
print '----------------------------------------'

One result of this code 4 is for exemple:

num== [2, 12, 16, 23, 26, 33, 38, 40, 43, 45, 51, 53, 84, 89, 93, 106, 116, 117, 123, 131, 132, 135, 136, 138, 146, 148, 152, 157, 164, 168, 173, 176, 179, 189, 191, 193, 195, 199, 200, 208, 216, 222, 224, 227, 233, 242, 244, 245, 247, 248, 251, 255, 256, 261, 262, 266, 276, 278, 291, 296, 298, 305, 307, 308, 310, 312, 314, 320, 324, 327, 335, 337, 340, 343, 350, 356, 362, 370, 375, 379, 382, 385, 387, 409, 413, 415, 419, 433, 441, 443, 444, 446, 459, 462, 474, 489, 492, 496, 505, 509, 511, 512, 518, 523, 541, 546, 548, 550, 552, 558, 565, 566, 572, 585, 586, 593, 595, 601, 609, 610, 615, 628, 632, 634, 638, 642, 645, 646, 651, 654, 657, 660, 662, 665, 670, 671, 680, 682, 687, 688, 690, 692, 695, 703, 708, 716, 717, 728, 729, 735, 739, 741, 742, 765, 769, 772, 778, 790, 792, 797, 801, 808, 815, 825, 828, 831, 839, 849, 858, 859, 862, 864, 872, 874, 890, 899, 904, 906, 913, 916, 920, 923, 928, 941, 946, 947, 953, 955, 958, 959, 961, 971, 975, 976, 979, 981, 985, 989, 990, 999]

several== [0, 4, 7, 9, 11, 14, 18, 21, 25, 28, 30, 32, 35, 37, 39, 42, 44, 46, 49, 56, 58, 60, 63, 65, 67, 70, 72, 74, 77, 79, 81, 86, 88, 91, 95, 98, 100, 102, 105, 107, 109, 112, 114, 119, 121, 126, 128, 130, 133, 137, 140, 142, 144, 147, 149, 151, 154, 156, 158, 161, 163, 165, 170, 172, 175, 177, 182, 184, 186, 196, 198, 203, 205, 207, 210, 212, 214, 217, 219, 221, 226, 228, 231, 235, 238, 240, 249, 252, 254, 259, 263]




len(num)== 200  : number of lines with ix_profile=='"7"'
USERS['BRAD']== 91
then :
1000 lines - 200 incorrect - 91 identical + 1 user BRAD = 710

len(USERS)== 710
len(USERS_short_4)== 710
USERS == USERS_short_4 is True

----------------------------------------
time of get_users() :
0.0788686830309 
----------------------------------------
time of get_users_short_4 :
0.0462885646081 
----------------------------------------
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 58.690677756 %
----------------------------------------

But results are more or less variable. I obtained:

get_users_short_1() / get_users() = 82.957476637 %
get_users_short_1() / get_users() = 82.3987686867 %
get_users_short_1() / get_users() = 90.2949842932 %
get_users_short_1() / get_users() = 78.8063007461 %
get_users_short_1() / get_users() = 90.4743181768 %
get_users_short_1() / get_users() = 81.9635560003 %
get_users_short_1() / get_users() = 83.9418269406 %
get_users_short_1() / get_users() = 89.4344442255 %


get_users_short_2() / get_users() = 80.4891442088 %
get_users_short_2() / get_users() = 69.921943776 %
get_users_short_2() / get_users() = 81.8006709304 %
get_users_short_2() / get_users() = 83.6270772928 %
get_users_short_2() / get_users() = 97.9821084403 %
get_users_short_2() / get_users() = 84.9307558629 %
get_users_short_2() / get_users() = 75.9384820018 %
get_users_short_2() / get_users() = 86.2964748485 %


get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 69.4332754744 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 58.5814726668 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 61.8011476831 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 67.6925083362 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 65.1208124156 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 72.2621727569 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 70.6957501222 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 68.5310031226 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 71.6529128259 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 71.6153554073 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 64.7899044975 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 72.947531363 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 65.6691965629 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 61.5194374401 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 61.8396133666 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 71.5447862466 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 74.6710538858 %
get_users_short_3() / get_users() = 72.9651233485 %



get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 65.5224210767 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 65.9023813161 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 62.8055210129 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 64.9690049062 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 61.9050866134 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 65.8127125992 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 66.8112344201 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 57.865635278 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 62.7937713964 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 66.3440149528 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 66.4429530201 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 66.8692388625 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 66.5949137537 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 69.1708488794 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 59.7129743801 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 59.755297387 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 60.6436352185 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 64.5023727945 %
get_users_short_4() / get_users() = 64.0153937511 %

.

I'd like to know what kind of result you would obtain with my code on your real file with a computer certainly more powerful than mine. Please, give me news.

.

.

EDIT 1

With

def get_users_short_Machin(log):
    users_short = defaultdict(int)
    f = open(log)
    # Read header line
    h = f.readline().strip().replace('"', '').split('\t')
    ix_profile = h.index('profile.type')
    ix_user = h.index('profile.id')
    maxsplits = max(ix_profile, ix_user) + 1
    # If either ix_* is the last field in h, it will include a newline. 
    # That's fine for now.
    for line in f: 
        #if i % 1000000 == 0: print "Line %d" % i # progress notification
        l = line.split('\t', maxsplits)
        if l[ix_profile] != '"7"': # "7" indicates a bad value
            # use list slicing to remove quotes
            users_short[l[ix_user][1:-1]] += 1 
    f.close()
    return users_short

I've got

get_users_short_Machin() / get_users() = 60.6771821308 %
get_users_short_Machin() / get_users() = 71.9300992989 %
get_users_short_Machin() / get_users() = 85.1695214715 %
get_users_short_Machin() / get_users() = 72.7722233685 %
get_users_short_Machin() / get_users() = 73.6311173237 %
get_users_short_Machin() / get_users() = 86.0848484053 %
get_users_short_Machin() / get_users() = 75.1661981729 %
get_users_short_Machin() / get_users() = 72.8888452474 %
get_users_short_Machin() / get_users() = 76.7185685993 %
get_users_short_Machin() / get_users() = 82.7007096958 %
get_users_short_Machin() / get_users() = 71.1678957888 %
get_users_short_Machin() / get_users() = 71.9845835126 %

Using a simple dict:

users_short = {}
.......
for line in f: 
    #if i % 1000000 == 0: print "Line %d" % i # progress notification
    l = line.split('\t', maxsplits)
    if l[ix_profile] != '"7"': # "7" indicates a bad value
        # use list slicing to remove quotes
        us = l[ix_user][1:-1]
        if us not in users_short:
            users_short[us] = 1
        else:
            users_short[us] += 1

improves a little the execution's time but it remains higher than my last code 4

get_users_short_Machin2() / get_users() = 71.5959919389 %
get_users_short_Machin2() / get_users() = 71.6118864535 %
get_users_short_Machin2() / get_users() = 66.3832514274 %
get_users_short_Machin2() / get_users() = 68.0026407277 %
get_users_short_Machin2() / get_users() = 67.9853921552 %
get_users_short_Machin2() / get_users() = 69.8946203037 %
get_users_short_Machin2() / get_users() = 71.8260030248 %
get_users_short_Machin2() / get_users() = 78.4243267003 %
get_users_short_Machin2() / get_users() = 65.7223734428 %
get_users_short_Machin2() / get_users() = 69.5903935612 %

.

EDIT 2

The fastest:

def get_users_short_CSV(log):
    users_short = {}
    f = open(log,'rb')
    rid = csv.reader(f,delimiter='\t')
    # Read header line
    h = rid.next()
    ix_profile = h.index('profile.type')
    ix_user = h.index('profile.id')
    # If either ix_* is the last field in h, it will include a newline. 
    # That's fine for now.

    glo = (max(ix_profile,ix_user) + 1) * ['[^\t]*']
    glo[ix_profile] = '"(?!7")[^\t\r\n"]*"'
    glo[ix_user] = '"([^\t\r\n"]*)"'
    regx = re.compile('\t'.join(glo))

    for line in f:
        gugu = regx.match(line)
        if gugu:
            gugugroup = gugu.group(1)
            if gugugroup in users_short:
                users_short[gugugroup] += 1
            else:
                users_short[gugugroup] = 1

    f.close()
    return users_short

result

get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 31.6443901114 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 44.3536176134 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 47.2295100511 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 45.4912200716 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 63.7997241038 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 43.5020255488 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 40.9188320386 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 43.3105062139 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 59.9184895288 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 40.22047881 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 48.3615872543 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 47.0374831251 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 44.5268626789 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 53.1690205938 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 43.4022458372 %

.

EDIT 3

I tested get_users_short_CSV() with 10000 lines in the file instead of only 1000:

len(num)== 2000  : number of lines with ix_profile=='"7"'
USERS['BRAD']== 95
then :
10000 lines - 2000 incorrect - 95 identical + 1 user BRAD = 7906

len(USERS)== 7906
len(USERS_short_CSV)== 7906
USERS == USERS_short_CSV is True

----------------------------------------
time of get_users() :
0.794919186656 
----------------------------------------
time of get_users_short_CSV :
0.358942826532 
----------------------------------------
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 41.5618307521 %

get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 42.2769300584 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 45.154631132 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 44.1596819482 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 30.3192350266 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 34.4856637748 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 43.7461535628 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 41.7577246935 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 41.9092878608 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 44.6772360665 %
get_users_short_CSV() / get_users() = 42.6770989413 %
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