Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

With reg to this question Pi in C#

I coded the below code and gives a output with last 6 digits as 0. So I want to improve the program by converting everything to decimal. I have never used decimal in C# instead of a double before and I am only comfortable with double in my regular use.

So please help me with decimal conversion, i tried to replace all double to decimal at start and it didnt turn good :(.

 using System;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
    Console.WriteLine(" Get PI from methods shown here");
    double d = PI();
    Console.WriteLine("{0:N20}",
        d);

    Console.WriteLine(" Get PI from the .NET Math class constant");
    double d2 = Math.PI;
    Console.WriteLine("{0:N20}",
        d2);
    }

    static double PI()
    {
    // Returns PI
    return 2 * F(1);
    }

    static double F(int i)
    {
    // Receives the call number
   //To avoid so error
    if (i > 60)
    {
        // Stop after 60 calls
        return i;
    }
    else
    {
        // Return the running total with the new fraction added
        return 1 + (i / (1 + (2.0 * i))) * F(i + 1);
    }
    }
}

Output

Get PI from methods shown here 3.14159265358979000000 Get PI from the .NET Math class constant 3.14159265358979000000

share|improve this question
    
Check out Eric Lippert's answer to a very similar question: stackoverflow.com/questions/4107047/c-high-double-precision/… –  Justin May 5 '11 at 18:54
    
@Justin, I dont want to change algorithm to Eric's. I am comfortable with this. –  Karthik Ratnam May 5 '11 at 19:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, replacing double with decimal is a good start - and then all you need to do is change the constant from 2.0 to 2.0m:

static decimal F(int i)
{
    // Receives the call number
    // To avoid so error
    if (i > 60)
    {
        // Stop after 60 calls
        return i;
    }
    else
    {
        // Return the running total with the new fraction added
        return 1 + (i / (1 + (2.0m * i))) * F(i + 1);
    }
}

Of course it's still going to have limited precision, but slightly more than double. The result is 3.14159265358979325010.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.