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I have a normal Windows Server 2008 installation with II7. Each website has it's own application pool. But there is a security realated problem.

There is no restriction for an asp.net application to write a file into C: or any other directorys. In IIS 6 before this could happen I would have to set those rights in the windows folder secuity permissions and allow the ASPNET_Usr to do that.

What is the best practice for hosting asp.net applications and not allowing them to write an read files in eg c:?

EDIT

Anonymous Auth. is enabled and the User specified is "ISUR". All other Authentications are disabled. In the application pool I use as Process Identity "Network Service".

I created a new User on the Server (not in the domain) "www.xyz.test" and deleted all his group memberships. Changed the Process identity to this user and made the anonymous authetication use the app pool identity and was still able to write to C:.

Changing the trust level is in my case not an option because we use an 3rd party application

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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Sounds like the web site permissions (in IIS) are set to either
- Windows Auth: And you are logging in with someone who has permissions to those folders
or
- Anonymous Auth: And the account that is being used for impersonation has permissions

Best practice would be to make sure the account which is being used to access the site (i.e. if windows auth - your account or if anonymous then the account which is impersonated) does not have permissions on the folders.

You could also raise the trust level to medium, high or full in the machine.config for additional security enforcement policies - however use with caution as it can cause some ASP.NET apps to fail.

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Anonymous Ath is enabled and the User specified is "ISUR". All other Authentications are disabled. In the application pool I use as Process Identity "Network Service". –  Stefan Gruber Feb 26 '09 at 12:45
    
I created a new User on the Server (not in the domain) "www.xyz.test" and deleted all his group memberships. Changed the Process identity to this user and made the anonymous authetication use the app pool identity and was still able to write to C:. –  Stefan Gruber Feb 26 '09 at 12:45
    
Changing the trust level is in my case not an option because we use an 3rd party application –  Stefan Gruber Feb 26 '09 at 12:46
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It all depends on what user account your asp.net website is running on. I.e. is it Network Service? As far as I am aware, if I want to be able to write to the web directory then I give my website account write access solely to the directory where I want to save files. The account I use is the one used for Anonymous Authentication.

I.e. I have a website called mycompany.com . I create this user account as part of the domain user group. I add this as the anonymous authentication credentials and give it access to the web root, and also write access tot he nested folder which I want to write too.

The User account would be called mycompany.com so i know that it has a reponsibility solely for permissions related to the web and that particular website.

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