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I'm trying to create a method which iterates through a hashtable and returns the key as a string, whats the best way to go about this?

EDIT: copied from comment

Sorry if I didn't make it more clear, I'm trying to do this in Java. I've created a test class

public void runprog() {
    hashMap.put("Butter", 50);
    hashMap.put("Beans", 40);
    for (Object o: hashMap.entrySet() ) {
        Map.Entry entry = (Map.Entry) o;
        System.out.println(entry.getKey() + " " + entry.getValue());
    }
}

it outputs

Butter 50
Beans 40

I've created a method which looks for a Key and returns the value

public Object findValue(String Name){
    for (Object o: hashMap.entrySet()) {
        Map.Entry entry = (Map.Entry) o;
        return entry.getValue();
    }
    return null;
}

when I look for Butter it returns 50 when i look for Beans it returns 50

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Which key do you want to return? What have you tried so far, and how does it not work? More info, please! –  Michael Borgwardt Feb 26 '09 at 12:21
1  
Why are you iterating over it? It's a hash table, lookups are performed through hashing... –  Aaron Maenpaa Feb 26 '09 at 12:22
    
Please elaborate more. –  Gerrie Schenck Feb 26 '09 at 12:25
    
Yes, it is a map, just use map methods like get, don't waste time iterating over it! Also, you don'd to iterate over the INTERNAL implementation. you can use Map.keys() and map.values() –  John Gardner Feb 26 '09 at 18:30

5 Answers 5

Seems like homework given the example data ("Butter", "Beans")...

In your example, findValue returns the FIRST KEY in the map/table everytime. You're not even using the key (Name) which you pased in. Here is an example that fixes your problem, thought you're using maps in all the wrong way.

a better way:

// assume Name is your key, ex. "Butter" 
// No need to iterate since maps are designed for lookup
Object value = map.get(Name);

your example, fixed:

public Object findValue(String Name){
    for (Object o: hashMap.entrySet()) {
        Map.Entry entry = (Map.Entry) o;

        // THIS IS THE IMPORTANT LINE
        if(entry.getKey().equale(Name))
        {
            return entry.getValue();
        }
    }
    return null;
}
share|improve this answer

Set up:

	final Object sentinal = new Object();


	Map<String, Object> map = new HashMap<String, Object>(){{
		put("key1", new Object());
		put("key2", sentinal);
	}};

Given a key, find a value (lookup):

	System.out.println(map.get("key2") == sentinal);

Given a value, find it's key (reverse lookup):

	for(Map.Entry<String, Object> entry : map.entrySet()){
		if(entry.getValue() == sentinal){
			System.out.println(entry.getKey());
		}
	}

... though, if I have to do regular reverse lookups, I generally build a reverse map:

	Map<Object, String> reverse = new HashMap<Object, String>();
	for(Map.Entry<String, Object> entry : map.entrySet()){
		reverse.put(entry.getValue(), entry.getKey());
	}
	System.out.println(reverse.get(sentinal));
share|improve this answer

Looking at your second snippet of code, you're not actually using the Name parameter anywhere. So what's happening is that the first time around the loop, the entry's value is returned - and the first value happens to be 50.

You need to check whether the key of the entry actually equals the name you're looking for...

share|improve this answer

Sorry if I didn't make it more clear, I'm trying to do this in Java. I've created a test class

    public void runprog() {
    hashMap.put("Butter", 50);
    hashMap.put("Beans", 40);
    for (Object o: hashMap.entrySet() ) {
        Map.Entry entry = (Map.Entry) o;
        System.out.println(entry.getKey() + " " + entry.getValue());
    }
}

it outputs

Butter 50
Beans 40

I've created a method which looks for a Key and returns the value

    public Object findValue(String Name){
    for (Object o: hashMap.entrySet()) {
        Map.Entry entry = (Map.Entry) o;
        return entry.getValue();
    }
    return null;
}

when I look for Butter it returns 50 when i look for Beans it returns 50

share|improve this answer
    
I still don't understand what you're trying to achieve... –  pgras Feb 26 '09 at 12:47

Using for loop to get key by value is not time effecient!! and you don't benefit from HashTable.

So since you want to use hashtable for straight and reverse retrival you may use two hashtables. Table1 (key, value) Table2 (value, key)

//Table1
hashtable1.put("Butter", 50);
hashtable1.put("Beans", 40);

//Table2
hashtable2.put(50, "Butter");
hashtable2.put(40, "Beans");

//Retrieving by key
System.out.println(hashtable1.get(50));

//Retrieving by value
System.out.println(hashtable2.get("Butter"));

Output


Butter

50

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