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Database:

Transaction  ProductID
 1              1000
 2              1000
 2              1001 
 3              1000
 3              1002
 4              1000
 4              1001
 5              1003

and L2 table:

PRODUCTID1  PRODUCTID2 
  1000       1001         
  1000       1002         

I want to self join L2.

ex; first row{1000,1001} and second row {1000,1002}-->result {1000,1001,1002}

How to find this result with a T-SQL statement? And find support(Count) value from my Transaction table? I mean {1000,1001,1002} count which sold together.

note: it's just sample database. I have a much bigger database for this.

+-------------+-----------+-----------------+---------+
| PRODUCTID1  | PRODUCTID2|   PRODUCTID3    | SUPPORT |
+-------------+-----------+-----------------+---------+
|      1000   |   1001    |       1002      |    0    |
+-------------+-----------+-----------------+---------+

Test Table:

create table transactions(
   ORDERID    INT,
   PRODUCTID INT
);

insert into transactions(ORDERID, PRODUCTID)
values ('1', '1000')
      ,('2', '1000')
      ,('2', '1001')
      ,('3', '1000')
      ,('3', '1002')
      ,('4', '1000')
      ,('4', '1001'),
       ('5', '1003');

CREATE TABLE L2 
   (PRODUCTID1 INT,
    PRODUCTID2 INT)

INSERT INTO L2 (PRODUCTID1,PRODUCTID2)
VALUES (1000,1001),(1000,1002)

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand what the data in the L2 table is supposed to represent, or what the value of the SUPPORT column in your results should be based on. Can you clarify please? –  Joshua Carmody May 5 '11 at 20:08
    
Support means count which include {1000,1001,1002}. Nobody transactionID has {1000,1001,1002} 3-item together, hence it's support 0. in L2 Table i keep 2-items which sold together. –  Ozkan Koylu May 5 '11 at 20:36
    
if you added a primary key to the L2 table it would make things easier –  Marcin K May 5 '11 at 21:10
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm still struggling to understand exactly what you're trying to accomplish here, and I think you're probably making it a lot more complicated then it needs to be.

However, using your existing table setup, I think you can get the count of certain 3-product combinations sold together without even using L2, by doing something like this:

select
    T1.PRODUCTID AS PRODUCTID1,
    T2.PRODUCTID AS PRODUCTID2,
    T3.PRODUCTID AS PRODUCTID3,
    COUNT(DISTINCT T1.ORDERID) AS SUPPORT
FROM transactions T1
JOIN transactions T2 ON T2.PRODUCTID > T1.PRODUCTID AND T2.ORDERID = T1.ORDERID
JOIN transactions T3 ON T3.PRODUCTID > T1.PRODUCTID AND T3.PRODUCTID > T2.PRODUCTID AND T3.ORDERID = T1.ORDERID
GROUP BY T1.PRODUCTID, T2.PRODUCTID, T3.PRODUCTID

This will not return any records where SUPPORT would be 0 though. Only if there were at least 1 transaction where that product combination was sold would there by a row produced.

If this doesn't meet your needs, it would help if you could provide a better explanation of what you're trying to do any why. Also, is there a PRODUCT table? That might help.

In the test data you gave above, no 3-product combinations even exist (never more than 2 rows in transactions with the same ORDERID).

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