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What are the best practises to update/move a Database in Prod with the dev or the test machine copy?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I use RedGate's SQL Compare tool to keep the schema of 2 databases in sync. It's not cheap, but it's worth it if you are constantly pushing changes to production.

http://www.red-gate.com/products/sql-development/sql-compare/

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+1 love RedGate –  Jack Marchetti May 5 '11 at 21:43
    
Me too. It's more than paid for itself in saved time. –  thursdaysgeek May 5 '11 at 21:45
    
@Jack Marchetti: Thanks for the suggestions. I tried using the software, but looks like it doesnot resolve dependencies between tables. For example, lets say a column's name has changed which is also being referenced on a new foreign key column. Looks like the order in which these executions should take place is not done automatically. (Changing the column name first and then creating the foreign key column and not the other way round). Is this how it works or am I missing something? –  Lrn May 9 '11 at 16:49
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There are a few cases where I make the script and then edit it. I don't use a lot of foreign keys, but in a case like that I would still use RedGate to make the script, then change it as needed. Run it against test, and if it works, you're good for prod. –  thursdaysgeek May 9 '11 at 20:23

I use the RedGate tools to create a script. Start wtih dev/test/prod all matching, then make the changes in dev. Compare dev to test with RedGate Compare and Data Compare (as needed), and let it make the scripts. I can then use the same script when moving the changes to prod.

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@thursdaygeek - Thanks for the suggestions. I tried using the software, but looks like it doesnot resolve dependencies between tables. For example, lets say a column's name has changed which is also being referenced on a new foreign key column. Looks like the order in which these executions should take place is not done automatically. (Changing the column name first and then creating the foreign key column and not the other way round). Is this how it works or am I missing something? –  Lrn May 9 '11 at 16:50
    
I've not had issues with this, but it sounds like you're doing more complex changes. I have noticed that it drops foreign keys and indexes, makes changes to tables (sometimes by copying data to a temporary table and then copying it back after the changes are made), and then re-creates the indexes and foreign keys. It's always possible to save the changes to a script, and do fine-tuning on it there. Even if it doesn't get every bit perfect, it still saves a ton of work. –  thursdaysgeek Jun 17 '11 at 18:13

For a free tool similar to RedGate's tool see this project: http://code.google.com/p/sql-dbdiff/

We use it to keep our dev and production databases in sync. Its a bit less flashy than RedGate's tool, but it works perfectly and you can't beat the price. Added bonus: You can get the source code and modify it yourself if you like.

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+1 Nice free open source tool! –  Jose Chama Jul 14 '11 at 15:59

For us, we move it via T-SQL statements (CREATE TABLE, etc.) We never copy an actual database and before we run the T-SQL on the production server, we have a review of the code.

Also, make sure that anything you do has the ability to roll back in case of issue.

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Yes, you can create a DTS job to import from the dump on timely basis.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc917688.aspx

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