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For a homework I code in Java(with which I'm a newbie), I bump into the problem of creating a console command list. The user will be confronted with a set of commands, among which s/he will choose his/her choice with a number. Something like this:

Enter your choice:
0) Create a Table
1) List All Tables
2) Delete a Table
3) Insert a Record
4) List All Records
5) Delete a Record
6) Find a Record(by =)
7) Find a Record(by >)
8) Find a Record(by <)
9) Exit

The first way I have done it is as follows(unnecessary code parts are truncated):

...

outerLoop: while (true) {
    Scanner s = new Scanner(System.in);
    try {
        while (true) {
            System.out.println("Enter your choice:");
            displayChoiceList();
            int choice = s.nextInt();
            switch (choice) {
            case 1:
                processTableCreation();
                break;
            case 2:
                catalog.listAllTables();
                break;
            case 3:
                System.out.println("Enter the name of table:");
                String tableName = s.nextLine();
                catalog.deleteTable(tableName);
                break;
            case 4:
                processRecordInsertion();
                break;
            case 5:
                processListAllRecords();
                break;
            case 6:
                processDeleteRecord();
                break;
            case 7:
                processFindRecord(Constants.Operator.EQUAL);
                break;
            case 8:
                processFindRecord(Constants.Operator.SMALLER);
                break;
            case 9:
                processFindRecord(Constants.Operator.GREATER);
                break;
            case 10:
                break outerLoop;
            }
        }
    } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
        System.out.println("Error: " + e.getMessage());
    } catch (IOException e) {
        System.out.println(e.getMessage());
        return;
    }
}

...

private static void displayChoiceList() {
    String[] choices = new String[] { "Create Table", "List All Tables",
            "Delete a Table", "Insert a Record to a Table",
            "List all records", "Delete a record",
            "Find by Primary Key(=)", "Find by Primary Key(<)",
            "Find by Primary Key(>)", "Exit" };
    int id = 0;
    for (String choice : choices) {
        System.out.println((id + 1) + ") " + choice);
        ++id;
    }
}

Then, thinking that this is ugly, and for the sake of experimenting with Enums, I have tried the following:

private enum Command {
    CREATE_TABLE("Create a Table"),
    LIST_ALL_TABLES("List All Tables"),
    DELETE_TABLE("Delete a Table"),
    INSERT_RECORD("Insert a Record"),
    LIST_ALL_RECORDS("List All Records"),
    DELETE_RECORD("Delete a Record"),
    FIND_RECORD_EQ("Find a Record(by =)"),
    FIND_RECORD_GT("Find a Record(by >)"),
    FIND_RECORD_LT("Find a Record(by <)"),
    EXIT("Exit");

    private final String message;

    Command(String message) {
        this.message = message;
    }

    public String message() { return this.message; }
}

...

outerLoop: while (true) {
    Scanner s = new Scanner(System.in);
    try {
        while (true) {
            System.out.println("Enter your choice:");
            displayChoiceList();
            int choice = s.nextInt();

            if (choice == Command.CREATE_TABLE.ordinal())
                processTableCreation();
            else if (choice == Command.LIST_ALL_TABLES.ordinal())
                catalog.listAllTables();
            else if (choice == Command.DELETE_TABLE.ordinal()) {
                System.out.println("Enter the name of table:");
                String tableName = s.nextLine();
                catalog.deleteTable(tableName);                     
            }
            else if (choice == Command.INSERT_RECORD.ordinal())
                processRecordInsertion();
            else if (choice == Command.LIST_ALL_RECORDS.ordinal())
                processListAllRecords();
            else if (choice == Command.DELETE_RECORD.ordinal())
                processDeleteRecord();
            else if (choice == Command.FIND_RECORD_EQ.ordinal())
                processFindRecord(Constants.Operator.EQUAL);
            else if (choice == Command.FIND_RECORD_LT.ordinal())
                processFindRecord(Constants.Operator.SMALLER);
            else if (choice == Command.FIND_RECORD_GT.ordinal())
                processFindRecord(Constants.Operator.GREATER);
            else if (choice == Command.EXIT.ordinal())
                break outerLoop;
            else
                System.out.println("Invalid command number entered!");
        } 
    } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
        System.out.println("Error: " + e.getMessage());
    } catch (IOException e) {
        System.out.println(e.getMessage());
        return;
    }
}

...

private static void displayChoiceList() {
    for (Command c : Command.values())
        System.out.println(c.ordinal() + ") " + c.message());
}

Actually, what I have in mind is using Enum's in switch with their ordinal values, but Java does not allow non-constant values in switch cases. What is the right way to solve this problem; the most elegant/scalable/flexible? Any constructive comments are highly appreciated!

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use Command.values(), which contains the enums in ordinal order:

switch (Command.values[number]) {
case CREATE_A_TABLE:
...
}

A more elegant and maintainable way is to elimate the switch statement using polymorphism:

abstract class Command {
    private String name;

    protected Command(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    @Override public String toString() {
        return name;
    }

    public abstract void execute();
}

and elsewhere:

Command[] commands = {
    new Command("Create a table") {
        @Override public void execute() {
            // code to create a table
        }
    },
    new Command("List all tables") {
        @Override public void execute() {
            // code to list all tables
        }
    }
};

for (int i = 0; i < commands.length; i++) {
    System.out.println(i + ":" + command);
}

int number = getInput();

commands[number].execute();

Advantages:

  • Shorter, clearer code
  • The compiler checks that each command is implemented (with a switch statement, you can forget to add a case statement, an error which will only occur at runtime. Granted, a good compiler will emit a warning if you forget a case when switching over enums, but a warning is more likely to be missed than a compilation error). ==> More robust during maintenance.
share|improve this answer

Would using Jakarta Commons CLI be cheating? ;-)

share|improve this answer
1  
Well, the part I'm asking about is totally unrelated to the essence of homework, I just want to learn; so it would not be cheating in any sense. However, I would like to get this done without using any other library. – kolistivra May 5 '11 at 22:02

Well, it's a curious approach, but if you just want to look at the use of Enums, then "ordinal()" is not recommended.

Better to make an Enum with 2 members. Not ideal, but it might help ..

private enum Command {
        CREATE_TABLE(0,"Create a Table"),
        LIST_ALL_TABLES(1,"List All Tables"),
        DELETE_TABLE(2,"Delete a Table"),
        INSERT_RECORD(3,"Insert a Record"),
        LIST_ALL_RECORDS(4,"List All Records"),
        DELETE_RECORD(5,"Delete a Record"),
        FIND_RECORD_EQ(6,"Find a Record(by =)"),
        FIND_RECORD_GT(7,"Find a Record(by >)"),
        FIND_RECORD_LT(8,"Find a Record(by <)"),
        EXIT(9,"Exit");

        private final String message;
        private final int code;

        public static Command get(int code) {
            for(Command c : Command.values()) {
                if(code==c.code) {
                    return c;
                }
            }
            return null;
        }

        Command(int code, String message) {
            this.code= code;
            this.message = message;
        }
        public int getCode() { return this.code; }
        public String message() { return this.message; }
    }

Now you can get an enum using the static Command.get(int)

    private static void runCommand(int choice) {
        Command command = Command.get(choice);
        System.out.println("You Chose '"+command.message()+"'\n\n");
        switch(command) {
                ....
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Heh, great minds etc, eh? :) – Henrik Gustafsson May 5 '11 at 22:23
    
Hi Henrik. very similar, but there's drawbacks for both. I realise now I should have recommended an EnumSet instead ... download.oracle.com/javase/1,5.0/docs/api/java/util/… – laher May 5 '11 at 22:25
    
the problem with this approach is(besides its advantages) is that, it is not nice for me to modify whole list, if I would like to add a new command whose ID is to be 1; i need to shift all other values.. I do not want to manually modify IDs.. Maybe getting rid of the first member and simply using ordinal would help? – kolistivra May 6 '11 at 18:14
    
You're right, that's an issue, and @meriton's answer is much better! – laher May 7 '11 at 2:16

Using ordinals as identifiers is considered rather poor form, but perhaps you could use it like this?

private enum Command {
    CREATE_TABLE("Create a Table"),
    ...
    EXIT("Exit");

    private static final Map<Integer, Command> fromOrdinal;

    static {
        fromOrdinal = new HashMap<Integer, Command>();
        for (Command c : values()) {
            fromOrdinal.put(c.ordinal(), c);
        }
    }

    public static Command fromId(int commandId) {
        return fromOrdinal.get(c);
    }

    private final String message;

    Command(String message) {
        this.message = message;
    }

    public String message() { return this.message; }
}

and in your command handling class:

    ...
    Map<Command, Runnable> actions = new HashMap<Command, Runnable>(); // Fill this map with commands and implementations of runnable that does what the command should.

    ...
    void run(int command) {
        Runnable action = actions.get(Command.fromId(command));
        if (action == null)
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("No such command");
        action.run();
    }

But if you don't want to go the enum route there's nothing really stopping you from creating non-enum command objects. The upside of that is that they can implement, or can be configured to call the implementation of, the actual command:

interface Command {
    char getInputChar();
    String getMessage();
    void run();
}

Next step is to create a Map<Character, Command> constructed from map.put(c.getInputChar(), c) for all commands you want to use, much like the enum example. To execute you can just execute the run() method of the command.
share|improve this answer
    
Just a noob question: what is the part "static { fromOrdinal = ... }"? – kolistivra May 5 '11 at 22:24
    
It's a static initializer block, you can use it to calculate static values etc. It's run once some time after the class has been loaded and before the first access to the class. Don't do anything that might fail though since exceptions in static code makes stuff break in strange and sometimes hard to debug ways. – Henrik Gustafsson May 5 '11 at 22:25
    
That seems quite a bit more complicated than necessary: Why bother to create a fromOrdinal map by hand when each Enum class already provides a values() method that returns the enums in declaration order? – meriton May 5 '11 at 22:59

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