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R question. Let's say I have a string s = "bcabca". What is the simplest way to get "aabbcc" out of it, i.e., sort the letters in s?

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How do you define "simplest"? –  Joshua Ulrich May 6 '11 at 0:35
1  
Straightforward, natural, shortest :) For example, in Haskell you can say sort "bcabca", and get "aabbcc". This is something I call simple :) –  Leo May 6 '11 at 3:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Maybe not the most simple answer, but this will work:

paste(sort(unlist(strsplit(s, ""))), collapse = "")

Or modify the strReverse function that is defined in the help page for ?strsplit to suit our needs. We'll call it strSort:

strSort <- function(x)
        sapply(lapply(strsplit(x, NULL), sort), paste, collapse="")
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This one works, thanks. –  Leo May 6 '11 at 3:05

Here's a variant of Chase's solution that handles a vector of strings and keeps the original strings as names. ...and I get a chance to promote the use of vapply over sapply :-)

> x=c('hello', 'world', NA, 'a whole sentence')
> vapply(x, function(xi) paste(sort(strsplit(xi, NULL)[[1]]), collapse=''), '')
             hello              world               <NA>   a whole sentence 
           "ehllo"            "dlorw"                 "" "  aceeeehlnnostw" 
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Yes, never use sapply when you can use vapply! –  hadley May 6 '11 at 2:33
    
Thanks, now I know what vapply is. –  Leo May 6 '11 at 3:11
    
+1 for vapply, and also note that the first answer I also handles a vector of strings. –  Chase May 6 '11 at 3:31
    
@Chase's strSort works on vectors, while paste(sort(... does not. –  MichaelChirico Feb 19 at 20:03

It might be good to mention the stringi package for this problem. It's stri_order and stri_sort functions are very efficient, testing at half the time of the base R method mentioned above.

library(stringi)
## generate 10k random strings of 100 characters each
str <- stri_rand_strings(1e4, 100)
## helper function for vapply()
striHelper <- function(x) stri_c(x[stri_order(x)], collapse = "")
## timings
system.time({
  v1 <- vapply(stri_split_boundaries(str, type = "character"), striHelper, "")
})
#    user  system elapsed 
#   0.747   0.000   0.743 

system.time({
  v2 <- sapply(lapply(strsplit(str, NULL), sort), paste, collapse="")
})
#    user  system elapsed 
#   2.077   0.000   2.068 

identical(v1, v2)
# [1] TRUE
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is stringi passing things through C to speed up? –  MichaelChirico Feb 19 at 22:48
1  
@MichaelChirico - Yes, the package is written almost entirely in C –  Richard Scriven Feb 19 at 23:28
    
great--if speed is essential this is the way to go then. I still like that my answer is the quickest in base R! :) –  MichaelChirico Feb 19 at 23:30

I tried timing the options presented and they are all slower than a third option:

as.character(lapply(lapply(strsplit(x,NULL),sort),paste,collapse=""))

At least, this option is the speediest among those that apply to vectors (@Chase's first option, paste(unsort(..., does not work for vectors)

I used the following to compare performance:

dt<-data.table(id=1:1e4,
               name=substring(paste(letters[sample(26,size=1e6,replace=T)],
                                    collapse=""),
                              seq(1,1e6,by=100),
                              seq(100,1e6,by=100)))
times<-c()
for (i in 1:50){
  ptm<-proc.time()
  dt[,sort1:=lapply(lapply(strsplit(name,NULL),sort),paste,collapse="")]
  x1<-proc.time()-ptm
  dt[,sort1:=NULL]
  invisible(gc())
  ptm<-proc.time()
  dt[,sort2:=sapply(lapply(strsplit(name,NULL),sort),paste,collapse="")]
  x2<-proc.time()-ptm
  dt[,sort2:=NULL]
  invisible(gc())
  ptm<-proc.time()
  dt[,sort3:=vapply(name,function(xi) paste(sort(strsplit(xi,NULL)[[1]]),collapse=""),"")]
  x3<-proc.time()-ptm
  dt[,sort3:=NULL]
  invisible(gc())
  times<-cbind(times,c(x1[["elapsed"]],x3[["elapsed"]],x3[["elapsed"]]))
  print(i)
}

rowMeans(times)

Here is the result:

> rowMeans(times)
[1] 0.63264 0.65992 0.65992

I'm not sure why sapply and vapply are so much slower.

sanity check:

> identical(dt$sort1,dt$sort2)
[1] TRUE
> identical(dt$sort1,dt$sort3)
[1] TRUE
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