Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

Do you know a pretty ruby way to find if an hash has one of some keys ?

h = {:a => 1, :c => 3, :d => 4}
# keys to find are :a, :b or :e

I know that I can do a :

h.key?(:a) || h.key?(:b) || h.key?(:e)

But I was wondering if there was a prettier way to do it ! :)

Thanks a lot !

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by famousgarkin, toro2k, fivedigit, 2Dee, Peter Aron Zentai Sep 1 at 11:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Checkout this awesome answer which does not use any loops: stackoverflow.com/a/4743729/238880 –  Pratik Khadloya Jun 27 '13 at 15:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Consider Enumerable.any?

[:a, :b, :e].any? {|k| h.key?(k)}

From IRB:

>> h = {:a => 1}; [:x].any? {|k| h.key?(k)}                    
=> false                                                                
>> h = {:a => 1}; [:x, :a].any? {|k| h.key?(k)}                
=> true

Happy coding.

share|improve this answer
1  
Beat me by 30 seconds –  coder_tim May 5 '11 at 23:12
    
this is what i would do +1 –  Matt Briggs May 5 '11 at 23:31
    
And of course use .all? if you want to see if it has ALL the keys specified :). –  Mike Campbell Jan 29 at 14:59

Here is how you get all of the matching keys from an array:

> {:a => 1, :c => 3, :d => 4}.keys & [:a, :d, :e]
 => [:a, :d] 

and if you want a boolean (following Andrew's suggestion):

> ({:a => 1, :c => 3, :d => 4}.keys & [:a, :d, :e]).empty?
 => false 
> ({:a => 1, :c => 3, :d => 4}.keys & [:f, :e]).empty?
 => true 
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nice "alternative" solution with a set intersection. I would add that length > 0 of the result implied existence of at least one key. –  user166390 May 5 '11 at 23:15
2  
@pst: You could use .empty? if you just wanted a boolean. –  Andrew Grimm May 5 '11 at 23:53
    
Or .any? to check the opposite. –  famousgarkin Sep 1 at 8:45
    
.keys converts symbolic keys into strings, so it should be check like - {:a => 1, :c => 3, :d => 4}.keys & ['a', 'd', 'e']. –  poorva Sep 12 at 7:14

I would do something like this:

[:a, :b, :e].any?{ |val| h.key?(val) } 
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Close though ;-) –  user166390 May 5 '11 at 23:14
h.select{|k| [:b, :w, :e].include?(k) }.empty?
h.select{|k| [:a, :w, :e].include?(k) }.empty?

And you get hash (key and value) of matching key in return (without empty?)

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 For a different answer. However, this turns the operation into O(k*n), where k is the number of the keys in the hash and n is the length of the sequence with keys to try and find. –  user166390 May 5 '11 at 23:35

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.