Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a service that synchronizes data between two databases. This is quite risky mostly because this is new software that is not very well tested. This is why I need to do frequent backups - before every sync(the service performs that itself). After one day I got 13.9 gb file with backups. This is TOO MUCH.

I'm considering what are my options here and what to do with this. I'm trying to divide this database into two filegroups - primary and photos. After doing this I got 16mb and 120mb files. The important thing here is to backup those 16mb and be able to restore it when needed.

I don't really know what risks are here and what can happen. Can anyone briefly explain or give a link so that I can read?

What other options are there?

(The ultimate goal is that I can backup frequently with relatively small backup file sizes )

share|improve this question
    
With regards the "synchronization" are you sync'ing to another sql server instance? Any reason why you why you didn't go with a tried and tested technology like SQL Server Replication? –  pero May 5 '11 at 23:31
    
I'm synchronizing data between two completely different databases one from accounting software and the other e-commerce asp.net website. Both of them are using SQL Server. –  kubal5003 May 5 '11 at 23:34

2 Answers 2

You have tagged this question with MSSQL 2008.

MS SQL 2008 can utilize FILESTREAM to store collections of files in the filesystem rather than as blobs in the DB. However, it retains the ability to track and index the file locations.

In that case, when your sync service executes it should also transfer the contents of the FILESTREAM directory.

The result will be that your DB backups will be significantly smaller because they don't actually contain the files, just the locations and tables required for data integrity.

Here is an informative link on the FILESTREAM feature:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc949109(v=sql.100).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
This is great option! I'll try to implement it. –  kubal5003 May 6 '11 at 0:08
    
Um, Backups include the filestream data. Read the Integrated Management section from technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb933993.aspx (or, in fact, search the link you included for the word Backup) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 6 '11 at 6:41
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever sure it does but because the file data is kept separate from the row, a simple update on the row does not cause the file to be copied again on an incremental plan. –  Matthew May 6 '11 at 14:46
    
I suppose the same could be said of a referenced BLOB table too though.... –  Matthew May 6 '11 at 15:00

I have a service that synchronizes data between two databases. This is quite risky mostly because this is new software that is not very well tested. This is why I need to do frequent backups - before every sync(the service performs that itself). After one day I got 13.9 gb file with backups. This is TOO MUCH.

Please donot forget to shrink the log file before taking the database backup to avoid the unnecessary usage of Disk.

USE DatabaseName
GO
DBCC SHRINKFILE(LogFileName, 1)
BACKUP LOG DatabaseName WITH TRUNCATE_ONLY
DBCC SHRINKFILE(LogFile, 1)
GO
share|improve this answer
    
I've already done that. Shrinking doesn't really help - the log file was 267mb in size when I last checked and 0.25 mb free space was allocated. Thanks for reminding:) –  kubal5003 May 6 '11 at 8:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.