Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm experimenting with LINQ for the first time and decided to try basic human language identification. The input text gets tested against HashSets of the most common 10,000 words in the language and receives a score.

My question is, is there a better approach to the LINQ query? Maybe the other form that I don't know? It works, but I'm sure that the experts here will be able to provide a much cleaner solution!

public PolyAnalyzer() {
    Dictionaries = new Dictionary<string, AbstractDictionary>();
    Dictionaries.Add("Bulgarian", new BulgarianDictionary());
    Dictionaries.Add("English", new EnglishDictionary());
    Dictionaries.Add("German", new GermanDictionary());
    Dictionaries.Values.Select(n => new Thread(() => n.LoadDictionaryAsync())).ToList().ForEach(n => n.Start());            
}  

public string getResults(string text) {
    int total = 0;
    return string.Join(" ",
        Dictionaries.Select(n => new {
            Language = n.Key,
            Score = new Regex(@"\W+").Split(text).AsQueryable().Select(m => n.Value.getScore(m)).Sum()
        }).
        Select(n => { total += n.Score; return n; }).
        ToList().AsQueryable(). // Force immediate evaluation
        Select(n =>
        "[" + n.Score * 100 / total + "% " + n.Language + "]").
        ToArray());
}

P.S. I'm aware that this is an extremely simplistic approach to language identification, I'm just interested in the LINQ side of things.

share|improve this question
    
Belongs on codereview.SE, no SO. Btw., language detection on character-level n-grams tends to be more reliable. –  larsmans May 6 '11 at 12:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would refactor it like this:

    public string GetResults(string text)
    {
        Regex wordRegex = new Regex(@"\W+");
        var scores = Dictionaries.Select(n => new
            {
                Language = n.Key,
                Score = wordRegex.Split(text)
                                 .Select(m => n.Value.getScore(m))
                                 .Sum()
            });

        int total = scores.Sum(n => n.Score);
        return string.Join(" ",scores.Select(n => "[" + n.Score * 100 / total + "% " + n.Language + "]");
    }

A few points:

  1. The AsQueryAble() are unnecessary - this is all Linq to Objects, which is IEnumerable<T> - good enough.

  2. Removed a few ToList() - also unnecessary and avoids eager loading of results when not needed.

  3. While its nice having just one LINQ query it's not a competition - aim for readability overall and think about how you (and others) have to maintain the code. I split up your query into three more readable (imo) parts.

  4. Avoid side effects by all means possible - I removed the one you had to the variable total - it's confusing - LINQ queries shouldn't have side effects, because running the same query twice might yield different results. In your case you can just calculate the total in a separate Linq query.

  5. Don't re-new or re-calculate variables inside a Linq projection if not necessary - I removed the regex from the Linq query and initialized the variable once outside - otherwise you are re-newing the Regex instance N times instead of just once. This might have huge performance implications depending on the query.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed I can remove the AsQueryables! Thanks for the notes, I'll keep them in mind (especially the bit about the side effects). –  Vladislav Zorov May 6 '11 at 2:09
    
Accepting for the improvement of the code while keeping the functionality. Thanks for the tips :) –  Vladislav Zorov May 6 '11 at 23:48

I think the code you posted is very confusing. I've rewritten it and I think it gives you the same result (of course I couldn't test it and actually I think you're code has some wrong parts to it) but it should be much more concise now. Let me know if this is incorrect.

public PolyAnalyzer()
{
    Dictionaries = new Dictionary<string, AbstractDictionary>();
    Dictionaries.Add("Bulgarian", new BulgarianDictionary());
    Dictionaries.Add("English", new EnglishDictionary());
    Dictionaries.Add("German", new GermanDictionary());

    //Tip: Use the Parallel library to to multi-core, multi-threaded work.
    Parallel.ForEach(Dictionaries.Values, d =>
    {
        d.LoadDictionaryAsync();
    });            
}  

public Dictionary<string, int> GetResults(string text)
{
    //1) Split the words.
    //2) Calculate the score per dictionary (per language).
    //3) Return the scores.
    string[] words = new Regex(@"\w+").Split().ToArray();
    Dictionary<string, int> scores = this.Dictionaries.Select(d => new
    {
        Language = d.Key,
        Score = words.Sum(w => d.Value.GetScore(w))
    }));

    return scores;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the bit about words.Sum, that's much better than in my solution! –  Vladislav Zorov May 6 '11 at 2:01
    
You're welcome. And to add to this, you shouldn't "do stuff" inside of Select. You should only be selecting things within there. (E.g., don't calculate the total in there.) I hope this example is clear enough and works for you. –  Josh M. May 6 '11 at 2:10
    
Is there any other way to execute something for each element? –  Vladislav Zorov May 6 '11 at 17:37
    
Sure: elements.ForEach(e => DoSomethingWith(e)) –  Josh M. May 6 '11 at 17:53
    
Doesn't work... works only with List at least with .NET 3.5 (I have Visual Studio 2008 only) and I believe it doesn't return back e. –  Vladislav Zorov May 6 '11 at 23:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.