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1) Is it true that javac.exe is sun's implementation of a java compiler,

2) and a java compiler is defined as something that translates java source code into java bytecode,

3) and a JVM is defined as something that accepts java bytecode as input and actually tells the machine to do things.

4) and there are many different kinds of JVM, in fact different operating systems Require different JVMs,

5) and the JVM which runs on windows 98 is different from the JVM which runs on windows 7?

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@Pace: you should really only ask one question per question –  John Saunders May 8 '11 at 1:11
    
@John Saunders ok i'l keep that in mind –  Pacerier May 8 '11 at 1:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would take it that you're asking these questions to help you understand some of the basic concepts of JAVA, so let's not dig too deep and consider the many "exceptions" here.

1) Sun's implementation of the compiler is usually called javac.exe, but other compilers may name their executables javac.exe as well (I think c means compiler).

2) There's much more to it, but this in general is correct

3) That's not completely incorrect. Different JVMs may have different implementations, but the idea of the JVM is to translate the (supposedly) universal bytecode to machine/OS-specific code that can be executed on that particular computer.

4) Largely correct. Except we're defining "different OS" a little loosely. Some OSs share the same architecture, and they can use the same JVM. There can also be different JVM implementations for the same OS.

5) That I believe is true.

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1) Is it true that javac.exe is sun's implementation of a java compiler, - it depends, as any company / developer can distribute a Java compiler following the JVM spec.

2) and a java compiler is defined as something that translates java source code into java bytecode, - Yes it compiles source code into byte code

3) and a JVM is defined as something that accepts java bytecode as input and actually tells the machine to do things. - Yes

4) and there are many different kinds of JVM, in fact different operating systems Require different JVMs, - Correct, for each OS it should have its own implementation of the JVM, you cannot run a JVM for Windows on Linux

5) and the JVM which runs on windows 98 is different from the JVM which runs on windows 7? - Yes

In addition to your questions 2,3,4,5, the compiler transforms source code into bytecode for a JVM implementation to understand regardless where that JVM is running on.

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  1. Yes.
  2. Yes.

And it wouldn't let me post more than two links, anyhow, a simple search would yield a lot more information faster than waiting for replies here.

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why bother doing work looking up stuff, when you can get your homework done on SO. –  MeBigFatGuy May 6 '11 at 3:37
    
when you get more karma, you can post more links. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen May 6 '11 at 3:42
    
@MeBig That's rude. I've actually visited those links but since i may have misunderstood what is said there, i decided to confirm my understanding here. –  Pacerier Oct 18 '11 at 13:05

Yup. (JVM = Java 'Virtual' Machine)

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